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  1. The first American World Champion for 17 years. Not many had Kate Courtney on their shortlist for a medal at World Championships. Although she won Cape Epic and the US national title in her first year as an elite pro rider, she was considered to be a dark horse only by some optimistic experts that knew about her potential. However, with the ride of her life, she not only surprised her competition but also the whole mountain bike community. The SCOTT-SRAM team trusted in her talent already prior to the World Championships and believes this was just the first spark of a firework to come. Welcome Kate! Born at the base of Mount Tamalpais, Marin California, Kate's home-trails are the ones known to be the first ones in the history of mountain biking. Photos: SCOTTKate is known as a person who knows exactly what she wants and is ready to give 110% to reach her goals. The World Champion title came unexpectedly early even for her, but she did believe in herself at all times and worked hard towards the rainbow stripes. The future will bring a lot of changes to her. New team, new bike and high expectations that come with her status. She explains where she is heading to. "I am very excited to join the SCOTT-SRAM Team. This team represents an incredible opportunity for me to work with the legendary Thomas Frischknecht and ride alongside talented teammates, notably current Men’s World Champion Nino Schurter. The team has a very unique atmosphere which both maintains a champion standard and continues to breed enthusiasm and love for the sport on all levels. I am honoured to have the chance to learn from such knowledgeable individuals with a strong passion for the sport and a wealth of experience chasing big goals and achieving Olympic dreams. With their support and a shared vision for the future, I am eager to get to work and see what we can accomplish together in 2019 and beyond." I am very excited to join the SCOTT-SRAM Team. This team represents an incredible opportunity for me to work with the legendary Thomas Frischknecht and ride alongside talented teammates, notably current Men’s World Champion Nino Schurter. Kate Courtney 2018 World Champion SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing 23-year-old Kate Courtney was born and lives at the birthplace of mountain biking in the San Francisco Bay area, where she also graduated from Stanford University before she set her full focus on the sport. The 2 time US National Champion has quite a palmares in her books. In 2017 she won the U23 overall World Cup and a silver medal at the U23 World Championships. Lars Forster- 2018 European Champion Another strong addition to SCOTT-SRAM is Lars Forster. As most of the Swiss riders, the former U23 World Cup Champion was so far a bit in the shadow of Nino Schurter. At this year's European Championships in Glasgow, he stepped out of this shadow when the sun was shining on him, crossing the line first. At the finish-line at European Championship in Glasgow Lars Forster claims his biggest victory so far. Photos: SCOTT / ego-promotion The all-around talent is currently the Swiss Cyclo-Cross National Champion. Lars is familiar to the World Cup podium and is a top 10 UCI ranked rider. His ambitions match with the ones of Kate. Current Swiss National Champion Lars Forster at the start of his first cyclo-cross race in 2019. The 25-year-old Olympic athlete says: "Developing further towards the Tokyo Olympics, it is a huge benefit to be aside of the Worlds fastest Nino Schurter. Since the beginning of my career, I was dreaming to become a member of the team of Thomas Frischknecht, my idol of my early days. Together we can reach the next level." Developing further towards the Tokyo Olympics, it is a huge benefit to be a side of the Worlds fastest Nino Schurter. Since the beginning of my career, I was dreaming of becoming a member of the team of Thomas Frischknecht, my idol in my early days. Together we can reach the next level. Lars Forster, 2018 European Champion SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing Team director Thomas Frischknecht knows Lars Forster very well. Lars not only lives very close to the team headquarters, he is also a training buddy of Andri Frischknecht and close friends with Yanick-the-Mechanic Gyger. After all this time the team is super excited to welcome Lars to the family. Swiss Athlete of the Year- N1NO Schurter Team leader Nino Schurter can look back to another wonderful season. One of his greatest achievements in his career was just recently reached. He is the first mountain biker in history to be voted Swiss athlete of the year. You might think for an Olympic, World and World Cup champion that this isn't a big deal, but you would be wrong! N1NO was nominated 9 times before getting awarded as the best of the best. Finally, he was ahead of Tennis superstar Roger Federer and cross-country skiing legend and Olympic Champion Dario Cologna. Swiss athlete of the year 2018- N1NO Schurter. Photo: Adrian Bretscher The talented 24-year-old Andri Frischknecht completes the men's side of the team. In 2018 he made huge steps towards the top. Two times he reached the Top 10 in the World Cup, at World Championships he placed 13th and at Swiss Nationals he earned a bronze medal. Keep an eye on this young gun! Andri Frischknecht finished twice in Top Ten in 2018. Photo: Sven Martin Unfortunately, SCOTT-SRAM has to say goodbye to two riders. After 4 years with SCOTT-SRAM, Dutch Champion Michiel van der Heijden is looking into a new future. Also Cape Epic winner Matthias Stirnemann will leave the team, he is going to be back with his former team Möbel-Märki. Team director Thomas Frischknecht is super stoked about his future team. He explains: "We are going into the 18th season with this team and the rooster never looked more promising having both World Champions and the European champion in our colours. It's great to have a woman back on the team. Together with our established staff, we are going to have a fun time racing!"
  2. You are back at the Cape Epic this year, after not riding it last year. Does a race like the Epic have a big impact on your XCO season in terms of fatigue afterwards, and how does it fit into your training for the year? It’s quite different racing, if you intend to do well at Epic you need to train differently than you would for cross country races. But it’s early in the year and you can also use it as preparation, as a hard week. But then you need to be careful that you don’t go too far over your limits. I have reached a lot of my goals, and that’s going to be one of my next goals: to try and win the Cape Epic. In the past, I was just here to see how it went, more for training than racing. This year and especially next year are going to be different. After coming close in 2014, are you looking to make the podium this year? For sure, if we can get on the podium it will be great but if we see that Matthias [stirnemann] or I are struggling then we do not want to destroy ourselves. I do not think we have a chance for the overall podium this year, we haven’t raced yet. All the others guys have been training specifically for Epic, they already have races in the legs. For us, it is to get experience for Matthias, and also the other two members of the team.I’m quite relaxed, I don’t feel there is any pressure right now. I am looking forward to it - it is an awesome event. What advantages do you and Matthias Stirnemann have in the quest for the podium? We have a similar riding style and we are quite similar physically. We have a good chance to get away in technical stuff, and maybe being able to deal with the very high intensity riding from cross country will be an advantage. Why are the Swiss so good at mountain biking? It’s a great place to ride a bike. There are a lot of mountains, a unique trail network of hiking trails through the Alps that you can also ride on. From nearly everywhere in Switzerland you can start from where you live and go on a ride. Now more and more of the ski regions are building trails for summer, the winters are getting shorter and shorter, and they need to do something in the summer. Nearly all the ski resorts now have built bike parks, and offer different kinds of bike activities.We also have a really great cup, the Swiss Cup. You don’t have to drive far to get to the races. From any place in Switzerland you can probably get to all the races in under three hours, and from seven years onwards you can take part in races. The same weekend you also have a pro race, that’s one of the main factors. You are well known for your gym routines which have been documented in The Hunt for Glory video series. Do you think you do more gym work than your competitors, and is it something that you feel gives you an edge on the course? You need to be complete physically and as a mountain biker you need to be athletic in every way. For me, it is a must to do something like that to be successful. Just going out and riding is not enough for a mountain biker. You need to challenge your body in new ways: such as the co-ordination exercises. In my eyes that makes the difference. You have been to South Africa several times in the last few years. What do you think of the trails here? Here the trails are quite different to what we’re used to. In Switzerland, we have a trail network that goes through the whole country, the trails are quite old, and natural.Here the land is mostly privately owned, you have nice trails, but each are privately owned and managed, and access is controlled. Then the surface is quite different. We are used to more natural rocky trails, and here the dirt is quite different: more loose and sandy over hardpack. It’s good to ride here and get that practice. The opening leg of the 2018 UCI Mountain Bike World Cup will be held in Stellenbosch a week before the 2018 Absa Cape Epic. You mentioned that you would like to try and win the Epic next year, will you be racing the World Cup as well, how does that fit into your Epic preparation? Next year I will be here early, I would like to do some racing before the Epic as preparation, so the World Cup fits into that well. Nino Schurter and Matthias Stirnemann during the Prologue of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic Mountain Bike stage race held at Meerendal Wine Estate in Durbanville, South Africa on the 19th March 2017 Photo by Ewald Sadie/CapeEpic/SPORTZPICS You rode a 650b bike at the top end of the field for several years, while most of your competitors were on 29ers. With the release of the new Scott Spark RC 29er just before the Olympics last year you made the switch to 29er. Was there anything specific about the design of that bike that allowed you to make the swap comfortably and did you have to adjust your riding style at all? The bike has changed quite a bit. The first 29er frames manufacturers just blew up the size to fit the bigger wheels. The new Spark is really built around 29er wheels and the geometry has changed quite a bit. Also with Boost wheels are now much stiffer. So you won’t switch back to 27.5? No. But the 27.5 still makes sense for shorter people. I think for a lot of women- the 29er bike is just too big, and weight is an issue. Jenny won the Olympics on 27.5. I still believe if you are not tall it makes sense to go on 27.5 inch wheels. Jenny Rissveds is riding with a dropper seatpost at Epic, with an eye on maybe keeping it on for XCO. Is that something you would consider? Yes, we are starting to test more and more dropper posts. But for me there is not the right product out there yet. They need to be a bit lighter, and for cross country you don’t need that long travel to drop. For me, it doesn’t make sense to put one on. But dropper posts are going to be the future in cross country racing for sure. Do you make changes to your race bike for Epic compared to your cross-country bike? Yes, I ride softer suspension because you don’t ride as aggressively and a bit harder pressure in the tyres just to avoid flats. Will you be aiming to defend your Olympic title in Tokyo in 2020? Yes, that is the goal. I already have the most Olympic medals for a mountain bike racer but I don’t have two gold medals like Julien Absalon, so I’d like to defend my title in Tokyo, and see if I can get another medal. Four medals in four games would be amazing. What can be done to clean the sport of drug use? Just more controls, more testing out of competition. In some countries the system is not working. We in Switzerland already have quite a good system, we get tested by three different kinds of organisations, and there is a lot of out of competition testing. But I hear that other countries do not have a lot of out of competition tests. There is no organisation that is ensuring that testing is consistent in every country.I would say that cycling in general, and definitely mountain biking is cleaner than some years ago. Cross country mountain biking requires technical skills, and is a one day event, not an ultra endurance stage race like Tour de France, so it’s not just all about your engine. And there is not as much money at stake as on the road, so that also why I have the feeling that in mountain biking there are just a few cheating, I don’t think there are a lot- I don’t think I would be able to win races if it was that bad. I think on road it may be worse.
  3. Nino Schurter & Matthias Stirnemann of SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing celebrate winning the 2017 Absa Cape Epic during the final stage (Stage 7) of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic. Photo by Shaun Roy/Cape Epic/SPORTZPICS Riding as a team for the first time, Schurter and Stirnemann (SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing), along with their Young Guns back-up team, dominated the final few stages of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic. It meant they went into the final stage with a seven-minute gap over second-placed Christoph Sauser and Jaroslav Kulhavy (Investec-Songo-Specialized). With Sauser’s experience, however, Schurter and Stirnemann were taking nothing for granted on the 85km Grand Finale. “Today the plan was just to get to the finish. We didn't want to do anything stupid,” said an elated Stirnemann. “It was quite emotional for me, because anything can happen and at the beginning we thought Christoph and Jaroslav would attack, so we just wanted to stay with them.” Andri Frischknecht & Michiel Van der Heijden of Scott-SRAM Young Guns celebrate winning the final stage (stage 7) of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic. Photo by Shaun Roy/Cape Epic/SPORTZPICS As has been the case all week, though, Sauser was unable to find his legs when he needed them most. “Right after the start we noticed that Christoph wasn’t doing so well,” said Stirnemann. “Then I started to relax and we just rode sensibly so that there were no punctures or crashes.” The Absa Cape Epic debutant could hardly believe that he had won the event on his first attempt. “This is amazing, just amazing. I really can’t believe it. I think I need to go home now and take it all in before I realise what this means. It’s been great to ride in the yellow zebra jersey, and of course even better to finish in yellow and win the Absa Cape Epic.” Schurter, a bronze, silver and gold Olympic medal winner in cross-country racing, the win comes in his fourth Absa Cape Epic – his previous best had been a fifth place in 2014. The current Olympic and world champion, cool and calm as ever at the end, admitted that the strategy was always to come and win the Absa Cape Epic, but only in 2018. “The plan was to come here in 2018 and win, but we are a year early!” said Schurter. “This is very special. To win the Olympics and then come to South Africa and win the Cape Epic, that is great. After Rio it was always my intention to come and win the Absa Cape Epic, but this has taken us by surprise. I thought next year would be our year. We are ahead of schedule.” The 2017 Absa Cape Epic winner had nothing but praise for his back-up team of Van der Heijden and Frischknecht. “I have to say, our backup team was outstanding. To come here in their first Cape Epic and do so well is incredible. They are very special guys and they make the team very special. They made no mistakes all week.” Past champions like five-time winner Sauser have emphasised that the Absa Cape Epic can only be won with a back-up team. That point was proven yet again by the SCOTT riders. “You need a back up team to win this event, and as we have seen this week you need a good back up team,” said Schurter.” Grand Finale stage winner Michiel van der Heijden could barely contain his excitement, grinning from ear-to-ear after a phenomenal debut at the race. “I can’t describe it; this is just unreal,” he said. “We have two stage wins - which I never expected at the start of the Absa Cape Epic - and the team has won overall. It’s incredible. We have definitely surprised ourselves. The strategy for this year was for us to check the race out and then to come back in 2018 and help the SCOTT team win. Now I don’t know what we’ll do net year!” Prologue winners and race leaders for the first four stages of this year’s Absa Cape Epic, Manuel Fumic and Henrique Avancini, also finished with big smiles in Paarl despite dropping down to fifth in the overall standings. “We had more ups than downs this week,” said Fumic. “Overall, it was a good week for us. We came here to win the Prologue and we achieved that. Now we are going to drink lots of red wine and gin & tonics.” The lead bunch during the final stage (stage 7) of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic. Photo by Nick Muzik/Cape Epic/SPORTZPICS Christoph Sauser, who came out of retirement to try and win his sixth Absa Cape Epic, believes that the performances of cross-country specialists have changed the nature of the race, which is normally considered a marathon riders event. “I think this year has shown that the dynamic of the Absa Cape Epic has changed,” said Sauser. “Previously you could go slow and warm up in the first hour, but this year it has been full on for the first hour of the race. You needed to ride really hard as there was no let up. Going forward, I think we will see faster starts now and riders will have to change the way they train, focussing more on speed and cutting back on long hours as the race starts to get closer.” Asked whether he’d consider racing again in 2018, Sauser said, “I think now it’s time for retirement.” 2017 Stage 7 Men Stage Results1. Scott-SRAM Young Guns 18-1 Michiel Van der Heijden (Netherlands) 18-2 Andri Frischknecht (Switzerland) 2:57.14,9 2. Trek-Selle San Marco 2 13-1 Damiano Ferraro (Italy) 13-2 Fabian Rabensteiner (Italy) 2:57.32,3 +17,4 3. SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing 5-1 Nino Schurter (Switzerland) 5-2 Matthias Stirnemann (Switzerland) 2:57.53,2 +38,3 Overall Results 1. SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing 5-1 Nino Schurter (Switzerland) 5-2 Matthias Stirnemann (Switzerland) 26:35.06,5 2. Investec-Songo-Specialized 3-1 Christoph Sauser (Switzerland) 3-2 Jaroslav Kulhavy (Czech Republic) 26:43.13,9 +8.07,4 3. Centurion Vaude 2 16-1 Nicola Rohrbach (Switzerland) 16-2 Daniel Geismayr (Austria) 26:54.41,3 +19.34,8 4. Kansai Plascon 7-1 Hector Leonardo Paez Leon (Colombia) 7-2 Max Knox (South Africa) 26:55.39,2 +20.32,7 5. Cannondale Factory Racing XC 8-1 Manuel Fumic (Germany) 8-2 Henrique Avancini (Brazil) 27:04.57,0 +29.50,5 6. Scott-SRAM Young Guns 18-1 Michiel Van der Heijden (Netherlands) 18-2 Andri Frischknecht (Switzerland) 27:08.58,9 +33.52,4 7. PYGA Euro Steel 9-1 Philip Buys (South Africa) 9-2 Matthys Beukes (South Africa) 27:36.12,8 +1:01.06,3 8. Topeak Ergon Racing 4-1 Alban Lakata (Austria) 4-2 Kristian Hynek (Czech Republic) 27:48.45,2 +1:13.38,7 9. Centurion Vaude 6-1 Jochen Kaess (Germany) 6-2 Markus Kaufmann (Germany) 27:52.40,6 +1:17.34,1 10. Claes - Carabin 24-1 Frans Claes (Belgium) 24-2 Sebastien Carabin (Belgium) 28:03.21,3 +1:28.14,8
  4. Nino Schurter and Matthias Stirnemann of Scott SRAM MTB Racing during stage 6 of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic Mountain Bike stage race from Oak Valley Wine Estate in Elgin, South Africa on the 25th March 2017, Schurter and teammate Matthias Stirnemann were comfortable throughout Stage 6, winning ahead of South African Max Knox and his Colombian parter Hector Paez (Kansai Plascon). In doing so, they opened up a lead of almost seven minutes in the overall standings ahead of second-placed Christoph Sauser and Jaroslav Kulhavy (Investec-Songo-Specialized). Third on the day went to Nicola Rohrbach and Daniel Geismayr (Centurion Vaude 2.) Stage 6 was labelled as the 2017 Absa Cape Epic’s Queen Stage - the toughest of the seven stages. Riders set off from Oak Valley Wine Estate and were soon confronted with the major obstacle of the day, a daunting and lengthy climb up the Groenlandberg. It was on the way down from that crest that Sauser and Kulhavy’s race was effectively ended, with the former suffering yet another puncture. It allowed SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing to open their lengthy time gap. Jaroslav Kulhavy and Christoph Sauser during stage 6 of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic Mountain Bike stage race. Photo by Dominic Barnardt/Cape Epic/SPORTZPICS “The plan was basically to stay with Investec-Songo-Specialized the whole day and make sure they didn’t get away from us,” said Schurter. “We thought they might make a move today, but after Christoph got a flat on the first major downhill, we were able to attack and get away. From there we just went like it was another cross-country race. For us, it’s been eight days of cross-country riding.” Once again at this Absa Cape Epic, the pace was set at the start by South Africans Philip Buys and Matthys Beukes (PYGA Euro Steel). This time they were joined by Rohrbach and Geismayr. By water point 2 the Centurion Vaude 2 pair had opened a 45 second gap between themselves and the chasing pack (PYGA Euro Steel again succumbing to their 2017 puncture curse), but soon after they were caught by SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing, the SCOTT-SRAM Young Guns and Kansai Plascon. The Young Guns then punctured with Kansai Plascon and Centurion Vaude 2 dropping off the pace after water point 3. For the final 5km it was all Schurter and Stirnemann. “I don’t know what happened today, but it was much less suffering than yesterday! It was a good day on the bike,” said Stirnemann. “Every day I feel like I am getting stronger on the bike. I recovered well last night; that showed this morning when I could get my rhythm a lot quicker.” Max Knox of Kansai Plascon during stage 6 of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic Mountain Bike stage. Photo by Nick Muzik/Cape Epic/SPORTZPICS By the time the riders returned to Oak Valley a big crowd had gathered, and there were huge cheers for the first South African rider home. Reigning South African marathon champion Knox and Paez (a multiple Colombian national champion) have been in good shape all week, but have been rumbled by bad luck at inopportune moments. Today things finally went their way. Knox, tired but elated with second on the day, had nothing but praise for his teammate. “The stage was tough, very tough. The pace was hard,” he said. “I have to say, my partner Hector is incredibly strong. I was riding at the limit, pushing myself to go harder the whole time. I was dropping off and barely hanging in, but Hector just kept encouraging me, kept pulling me along. He’s incredible. I have been feeling off my game all week, but he has been immense.” Thanks to a steady week-long performance and an excellent Stage 6, Knox and Paez now also find themselves in third overall at the Absa Cape Epic. “This has been such a cross-country race so far; for us marathon racers there have only been two days that suited us, one of which was today. It’s amazing to be on the podium at last and great to come second today. Nicola Rohrbach and Daniel Geismayr of Centurian Vaude 2 lead the bunch during stage 6 of the 2017 Absa Cape Epic Mountain Bike stage race. Photo by Nick Muzik/Cape Epic/SPORTZPICS “This is such an amazing field this year; it’s been great to ride alongside world champions and Olympic champions. We’d obviously like to stay in the top three overall, but it’s not over yet. Tomorrow is another shorter day and the cross-country guys will be firing again.” After another untimely puncture, five-time champion Sauser all but conceded defeat. “I have been in these situations before, so I can deal with it, but I am obviously very disappointed,” he said. “I just had no energy on the bike, especially after the puncture. It will be hard, but I will have to get up to race again in the morning. I think now, unless there is a major catastrophe, our chances of winning are over. Nino and Matthias are too strong. I don’t think we can catch them.” 2017 Stage 6 MenStage Results 1. SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing 5-1 Nino Schurter (Switzerland) 5-2 Matthias Stirnemann (Switzerland) 4:26.38,9 2. Kansai Plascon 7-1 Hector Leonardo Paez Leon (Colombia) 7-2 Max Knox (South Africa) 4:26.55,0 +16,1 3. Centurion Vaude 2 16-1 Nicola Rohrbach (Switzerland) 16-2 Daniel Geismayr (Austria) 4:27.52,2 +1.13,3 Overall Results 1. SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing 5-1 Nino Schurter (Switzerland) 5-2 Matthias Stirnemann (Switzerland) 23:37.13,3 2. Investec-Songo-Specialized 3-1 Christoph Sauser (Switzerland) 3-2 Jaroslav Kulhavy (Czech Republic) 23:44.02,4 +6.49,1 3. Kansai Plascon 7-1 Hector Leonardo Paez Leon (Colombia) 7-2 Max Knox (South Africa) 23:52.00,0 +14.46,7 4. Centurion Vaude 2 16-1 Nicola Rohrbach (Switzerland) 16-2 Daniel Geismayr (Austria) 23:56.35,2 +19.21,9 5. Cannondale Factory Racing XC 8-1 Manuel Fumic (Germany) 8-2 Henrique Avancini (Brazil) 24:02.19,7 +25.06,4 6. Scott-SRAM Young Guns 18-1 Michiel Van der Heijden (Netherlands) 18-2 Andri Frischknecht (Switzerland) 24:11.44,0 +34.30,7 7. Bulls 1-1 Karl Platt (Germany) 1-2 Urs Huber (Switzerland) 24:26.38,7 +49.25,4 8. PYGA Euro Steel 9-1 Philip Buys (South Africa) 9-2 Matthys Beukes (South Africa) 24:36.57,0 +59.43,7 9. Topeak Ergon Racing 4-1 Alban Lakata (Austria) 4-2 Kristian Hynek (Czech Republic) 24:43.04,3 +1:05.51,0 10. Centurion Vaude 6-1 Jochen Kaess (Germany) 6-2 Markus Kaufmann (Germany) 24:49.16,8 +1:12.03,5
  5. Team SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing let us into their camp to reveal what they take along on a typical stage of the Absa Cape Epic. A view from the top: Some of the seldom seen elements for success at SCOTT-SRAM MTB Racing. Yes, that's a saddle bag - a Topeak Weatherproof Dynawedge to be precise. Fitted to none other than XCO World and Olympic Champ Nino Schurter's bike. Not something you'd see the team sporting in an XCO, but at the Cape Epic the riders need to be self sufficient. This pouch houses a spare Maxxis tube, with a little extra room to slot in other small items. This Topeak Mini 20 Pro multitool is not shy of tools. With 23 functions it sports allen wrenches up to 10mm, T10 & T25 Torx wrenches, screw drivers, spoke wrenches, emergency tire levers, and a chain tool. Oh, and a bottle opener for good measure. The team also carry a pump along, mounted in the conventional spot adjacent to the bottle cage. This Peak DX II from Topeak is designed for mountain biking and adds just 155 grams. Scott's MTB RC shoes are their top end model, designed for stiffness through the carbon outsole and light weight. It fastens using two Boa IP1 systems. Protecting their heads is the Scott Centric Plus helmet. It's an aerodynamic, yet well vented helmet which features MIPS for added safety. Keeping it simple: CO2 canister with the Topeak adapter attached, wrapped in some duct tape which secures a few cable ties - both of which can prove very useful for mechanical quick fixes. A spare chain link is neatly tucked beneath the Garmin mount straps. Swiss Sports Nutrition brand SPONSER provide sustenance during the racing. We spotted their High Energy bar, a tube of Liquid Energy gel, Energy Gums and Electrolyte Tablets. Oakley EVZero Shades GoPro Hero Session Garmin Edge 1000 A Sahmurai Sword tyre plug tool tucked neatly into the crank axel. Another Sahmurai Sword to be packed in a pocket. Now take a look at Nino Schurter's race bike in our Bikes of the Epic feature.
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