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Slowbee
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Thanks!

 

The warm vs cool colour debate was one had in the house from day 1. The previous owner (an old lady in her 80's) had the walls painted a sort of manilla beige colour. We hated it :lol:

 

After dozens of test pots and paint patches on the walls we settled on a slightly cooler white.

 

However we do have flexibility in that the lights I have been installing are all 16 million colour smart LED's, so I can change the lighting colours to give the rooms a warmer feel, all controllable through the Philips Hue app and Google Assistant.

 

attachicon.gifScreenshot_20210504-091033_Hue.jpg

 

As aside though, in SA we tend to go for warmer more earthy colours in our homes. I remember looking for places to rent in NZ and the abundance of dark grey/charcoal carpets in houses was weird at first. Now I'm used to that and when I see a beige carpet it looks weird to me. It's the same with wood furniture. They love the white oak/scandinavian look here. Sometimes walnut makes an appearance. But if I look back at all the dark brown reddish woods I grew up around, they seem outta place here. "Style" is definitely regional.

The walls inside my house are dark grey ... next time round they will be even darker :P

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The walls inside my house are dark grey ... next time round they will be even darker :P

Mine are a medium grey, but there are a lot of accent walls in everything from sky blue to deep teal.

Colour can really change a space so I just let my wife decide what needed to go where, she is a fine artist so colour is her thing.

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Mine are a medium grey, but there are a lot of accent walls in everything from sky blue to deep teal.

Colour can really change a space so I just let my wife decide what needed to go where, she is a fine artist so colour is her thing.

I know we are getting distracted here from the thread topic, but our house has tons of natural light all day ... so the dark colours work really well

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Posted (edited)

So after detouring this thread with DIY posts and talk of paint colours, I have a question for the woodworkers on here.

 

It's about routers.

 

I have one of those little Makita brushless routers with a plunge base and other accessories. It's great for a number of applications, but it is limited by its 1/4" collet.

 

makita-DRT50ZJX2-laminate-trimmer-skin-a

 

So I'm looking at getting a big-boy router with a 1/2" collet and a deeper plunge so that I can use bigger bits and have the option to mount upside down.

 

The model I'm looking at is the Makita M3600B as it is pretty reasonably priced (approx R2600). The catch is that it is not variable speed (22,000 rpm only).

 

M3600B_act_1.jpg

 

How crucial is the ability to vary the speed? I know the general rule is "the bigger the bit, the slower the speed". Would 22,000RPM cause issues with something like a 20mm radius roundover?

 

The ultimate plan for this router is 2 fold.

 

First:

 

Mount in an aluminium plate and build something to mount it onto the extension of my table saw.

 

HTB14iz1aUCF3KVjSZJnq6znHFXaI.jpg_q50.jp

These are reasonable from Aliexpress

 

 

15f9d1a927b8e3289ca82ecc4d20ad01.jpg

Something like this where the table saw fence can double up as the router fence.

 

Second:

 

Looking to get a Peanut 2 Mini Jig at some stage and they only have options for 8mm or 1/2" bits.

 

If you haven't seen the Peanut jig it's pretty awesome.

 

It's a way to create accurate, strong, self-clamping joints (90deg and 45deg) for collapsible builds.

 

Whilst I would love a Festool Domino, currently I cannot justify the price (Approx R18,000 for the base setup). The Peanut mini jig, whilst slower, is a fair bit more affordable (approx R3,600 after shipping form the UK)

 

 

Keen to hear your thoughts on the router (or any of the above)  :thumbup:

Edited by patches
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Posted (edited)

So after detouring this thread with DIY posts and talk of paint colours, I have a question for the woodworkers on here.

 

It's about routers.

 

I have one of those little Makita brushless routers with a plunge base and other accessories. It's great for a number of applications, but it is limited by its 1/4" collet.

 

 

So I'm looking at getting a big-boy router with a 1/2" collet and a deeper plunge so that I can use bigger bits and have the option to mount upside down.

 

The model I'm looking at is the Makita M3600B as it is pretty reasonably priced (approx R2600). The catch is that it is not variable speed (22,000 rpm only).

 

 

 

How crucial is the ability to vary the speed? I know the general rule is "the bigger the bit, the slower the speed". Would 22,000RPM cause issues with something like a 20mm radius roundover?

 

The ultimate plan for this router is 2 fold.

 

First:

 

Mount in an aluminium plate and build something to mount it onto the extension of my table saw.

 

 

These are reasonable from Aliexpress

 

 

 

Something like this where the table saw fence can double up as the router fence.

 

Second:

 

Looking to get a Peanut 2 Mini Jig at some stage and they only have options for 8mm or 1/2" bits.

 

If you haven't seen the Peanut jig it's pretty awesome.

 

It's a way to create accurate, strong, self-clamping joints (90deg and 45deg) for collapsible builds.

 

Whilst I would love a Festool Domino, currently I cannot justify the price (Approx R18,000 for the base setup). The Peanut mini jig, whilst slower, is a fair bit more affordable (approx R3,600 after shipping form the UK)

 

 

Keen to hear your thoughts on the router (or any of the above)  :thumbup:

 

Patches, I would really rather go for one with speed control - you will definitely regret it later on when you want to use a larger bit.  Maybe look for a second hand Makita - mine was really looking beaten up when I got it (< R 2000) and it works a charm.  It is now permanently mounted in my router table.

 

I have a slightly older version of this one:  The nice thing about this one is that you can make a simple long bolt to go through this lug to make depth adjustments from above the table:

 

post-50518-0-39564800-1620191687_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

On teh Domino:  Check out Pask Makes - he made his own domino.  You can use that nice trim router for this.

 

 

There are a few others on YouTube as well.

Edited by carrera4s
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I concur, the variable speed function is a must have as Carrera notes above.

 

I have a biscuit cutter bit I use from time to time on my router and 22k rpm is wild with that attached, so variability in speed is required. 

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Posted (edited)

I have a small Metabo router with variable speed that I have used for years, possibly regarded as a trimmer. You only need the big boy for heavy duty, high duty cycle work. Variable speed is NB, you need to spin the small bits fast and the big ones slow.

 

Battery power cordless is very handy but needs to be weighed up with cost. and generally  one will be working where there is a power point.

 

Check collet size though - you don't want to be stuck with the small one, and there are spacers to 1/4" - 1/2"

Edited by kosmonooit
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So after detouring this thread with DIY posts and talk of paint colours, I have a question for the woodworkers on here.

 

It's about routers.

 

I have one of those little Makita brushless routers with a plunge base and other accessories. It's great for a number of applications, but it is limited by its 1/4" collet.

 

makita-DRT50ZJX2-laminate-trimmer-skin-a

 

So I'm looking at getting a big-boy router with a 1/2" collet and a deeper plunge so that I can use bigger bits and have the option to mount upside down.

 

The model I'm looking at is the Makita M3600B as it is pretty reasonably priced (approx R2600). The catch is that it is not variable speed (22,000 rpm only).

 

M3600B_act_1.jpg

 

How crucial is the ability to vary the speed? I know the general rule is "the bigger the bit, the slower the speed". Would 22,000RPM cause issues with something like a 20mm radius roundover?

 

The ultimate plan for this router is 2 fold.

 

First:

 

Mount in an aluminium plate and build something to mount it onto the extension of my table saw.

 

HTB14iz1aUCF3KVjSZJnq6znHFXaI.jpg_q50.jp

These are reasonable from Aliexpress

 

 

15f9d1a927b8e3289ca82ecc4d20ad01.jpg

Something like this where the table saw fence can double up as the router fence.

 

Second:

 

Looking to get a Peanut 2 Mini Jig at some stage and they only have options for 8mm or 1/2" bits.

 

If you haven't seen the Peanut jig it's pretty awesome.

 

It's a way to create accurate, strong, self-clamping joints (90deg and 45deg) for collapsible builds.

 

Whilst I would love a Festool Domino, currently I cannot justify the price (Approx R18,000 for the base setup). The Peanut mini jig, whilst slower, is a fair bit more affordable (approx R3,600 after shipping form the UK)

 

 

Keen to hear your thoughts on the router (or any of the above)  :thumbup:

 

Look at Triton, I have the model which can take both 1/4 and 1/2 inch bits. They were an Aussie co until some years back so might be a good 2nd hand buy from where you are? Great router.

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Thanks for all the feedback gang!

 

Patches, I would really rather go for one with speed control - you will definitely regret it later on when you want to use a larger bit.  Maybe look for a second hand Makita - mine was really looking beaten up when I got it (< R 2000) and it works a charm.  It is now permanently mounted in my router table.

 

I have a slightly older version of this one:  The nice thing about this one is that you can make a simple long bolt to go through this lug to make depth adjustments from above the table:

 

attachicon.gifRP2301FCX.jpg

 

 

 

On teh Domino:  Check out Pask Makes - he made his own domino.  You can use that nice trim router for this.

 

 

There are a few others on YouTube as well.

 

I'll keep an eye out for speed control options. I have also read some reviews on other models I have looked at and the depth adjustment from above table is one big gripe people have with certain options.

 

As for the DIY Domino, I was wondering if anyone had dome something. Festool might have the patent, but it's not like it's a floating tenon machine is an overly complicated concept

 

I concur, the variable speed function is a must have as Carrera notes above.

 

I have a biscuit cutter bit I use from time to time on my router and 22k rpm is wild with that attached, so variability in speed is required. 

 

Yeah, I figured bigger bits at full tilt could get a bit scary!

 

I have a small Metabo router with variable speed that I have used for years, possibly regarded as a trimmer. You only need the big boy for heavy duty, high duty cycle work. Variable speed is NB, you need to spin the small bits fast and the big ones slow.

 

Battery power cordless is very handy but needs to be weighed up with cost. and generally  one will be working where there is a power point.

 

Check collet size though - you don't want to be stuck with the small one, and there are spacers to 1/4" - 1/2"

 

Agree. To date I haven't found massive advantage to my battery powered router/trimmer vs the corded one I replaced. However with some of the home reno work I do I have to isolate power, so that's where it'll shines. Also when working out on the front lawn (my garage is tiny) it makes it easier not to have to run extension cords, but in reality it's a minor inconvenience. Truth be told, I was going battery powered on the plunge/track saw, so I thought why not with the trim router :lol:

 

As for the collet size, thererin is my limitation. The little battery powered Makita is only 1/4" and would be under powered for 1/2" even if it could. Most of the 1/2" routers I have seen have the insert to take 1/4" bits too.

 

Between the Peanut jig and large router bits (that only come in 1/2" options), a second router would be handy.

 

I have already written off the idea of a battery powered full size router as I think only Hikoki make them at present, they're pricey, and I don't need to add a 6th battery platform to my setup :lol:

 

Look at Triton, I have the model which can take both 1/4 and 1/2 inch bits. They were an Aussie co until some years back so might be a good 2nd hand buy from where you are? Great router.

 

I have seen a Triton option or 2 pop up now and again. Mostly in a Triton router table setup. I have heard they're decent value for money tools, and like Carrera4s mentioned, a decent 2nd hand option may be better than a brand new entry level.

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I recently bought an old table saw, I believe it is a Delta saw. The plate on the motor states 1983 and there is no other information about the saw on it. I painted it light grey, I don't like the black frame it currently has, but the paint doesn't seem to adhere to the black paint. In fairness I just lightly sanded it.

 

My question now is what would be the best way forward? I guess I should use paint stripper to get all the loose paint off as well as anything else that comes off. Should the frame be cleaned completely to bare metal? To paint it again what would the process be? I guess primer first and then top coat? What paints and procedures do you recommend? I prefer to spray it so any paint recommendations that spray well will be beneficial. 

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I recently bought an old table saw, I believe it is a Delta saw. The plate on the motor states 1983 and there is no other information about the saw on it. I painted it light grey, I don't like the black frame it currently has, but the paint doesn't seem to adhere to the black paint. In fairness I just lightly sanded it.

 

My question now is what would be the best way forward? I guess I should use paint stripper to get all the loose paint off as well as anything else that comes off. Should the frame be cleaned completely to bare metal? To paint it again what would the process be? I guess primer first and then top coat? What paints and procedures do you recommend? I prefer to spray it so any paint recommendations that spray well will be beneficial. 

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Look at Triton, I have the model which can take both 1/4 and 1/2 inch bits. They were an Aussie co until some years back so might be a good 2nd hand buy from where you are? Great router.

I was also going to suggest the Triton, its particularly good if you want to use it in a router table as it has its own depth adjustment so you dont need to get a plate with that built in.

I have a Triton belt sander and its worked super hard without ever skipping a beat.

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I recently bought an old table saw, I believe it is a Delta saw. The plate on the motor states 1983 and there is no other information about the saw on it. I painted it light grey, I don't like the black frame it currently has, but the paint doesn't seem to adhere to the black paint. In fairness I just lightly sanded it.

 

My question now is what would be the best way forward? I guess I should use paint stripper to get all the loose paint off as well as anything else that comes off. Should the frame be cleaned completely to bare metal? To paint it again what would the process be? I guess primer first and then top coat? What paints and procedures do you recommend? I prefer to spray it so any paint recommendations that spray well will be beneficial. 

 

Paint stripper and a wire brush to bare metal. Self etching primer and any other colour (all preferably from Rustoleum). 

I've restored a few Delta machinery, one coated with water-based poly (I liked the bare cast iron look).. Others I've spray with 2k, which is overkill as most machines can be covered with2 rattle cans.

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Thanks for all the feedback gang!

 

 

I'll keep an eye out for speed control options. I have also read some reviews on other models I have looked at and the depth adjustment from above table is one big gripe people have with certain options.

 

As for the DIY Domino, I was wondering if anyone had dome something. Festool might have the patent, but it's not like it's a floating tenon machine is an overly complicated concept

 

 

Yeah, I figured bigger bits at full tilt could get a bit scary!

 

 

Agree. To date I haven't found massive advantage to my battery powered router/trimmer vs the corded one I replaced. However with some of the home reno work I do I have to isolate power, so that's where it'll shines. Also when working out on the front lawn (my garage is tiny) it makes it easier not to have to run extension cords, but in reality it's a minor inconvenience. Truth be told, I was going battery powered on the plunge/track saw, so I thought why not with the trim router :lol:

 

As for the collet size, thererin is my limitation. The little battery powered Makita is only 1/4" and would be under powered for 1/2" even if it could. Most of the 1/2" routers I have seen have the insert to take 1/4" bits too.

 

Between the Peanut jig and large router bits (that only come in 1/2" options), a second router would be handy.

 

I have already written off the idea of a battery powered full size router as I think only Hikoki make them at present, they're pricey, and I don't need to add a 6th battery platform to my setup :lol:

 

 

I have seen a Triton option or 2 pop up now and again. Mostly in a Triton router table setup. I have heard they're decent value for money tools, and like Carrera4s mentioned, a decent 2nd hand option may be better than a brand new entry level.

 

+ 1 for the variable speed on a router. But don't neglect ergonomics. It's such a useful tool with many applications that you might want to consider a higher end model. 

If you're planning to mount it in a table, the Triton with an aluminium plate from Jessem or Kreg is great option. I've the 1400w Triton and it's got enough grunt to run big profiles and finger grip/pull bits. 

 

As for domino vs dowel joiner jigs. Depends on what you're planning on using it for. Personally, doweling jigs don't appeal to me - they all seem too expensive for the amount of effort that is still required (they mostly seem too tedious). At the end of the day, you'd spend about half of what a domino machine would have cost you, but still have a compromised setup. Is that saving worth it is the question? 

Don't forget to look at a biscuit joiner, and seeing as you already dipped into cordless Makita ecosystem, they've a nice cordless one too.

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