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Deristricted E Bikes


The itch

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57 minutes ago, BuffsVintageBikes said:

Best of all, the people with e-bikes don't give a continental f&^k what others think about their e-bike habits, they're just loving their bikes

I dont know about that, they seem to be rather touchy about defending their choice in this thread.

 

But each to their own. 

This mornings group ride we had a lady on an e-bike making sure the rest of us on amish bikes were as strong as we said we were. The fact that she was out front touching 50 kph tells me it was definitely derestricted. 

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It would appear that it's lost on most of the e-bike evangelists commenting that it's not about THEM ........ it's about derestricted bikes and the unfairly influencing of the results of Amish bike races?

Or do I have it wrong....

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24 minutes ago, The Ouzo said:

I dont know about that, they seem to be rather touchy about defending their choice in this thread.

 

But each to their own. 

This mornings group ride we had a lady on an e-bike making sure the rest of us on amish bikes were as strong as we said we were. The fact that she was out front touching 50 kph tells me it was definitely derestricted. 

Careful what you assume. The standard restriction on a Specialized Creo e road bike is 42 kmh. Once you go up above that it turns off. It doesn't mean you can climb at 42 KPH BTW. Just you will get some assistance up to that speed depending on your chosen setting.

However once you have the bike moving - even the e MTB which is limited at 32 KPH - its easy to stay with a bunch . I often have the bike completely turned off and am sitting  at 45 KPH in a bunch if we are on flat or in a tail wind  - they are easy to pedal like a non assisted bike as the motor drag is negligible so its not unlikely she was not being assisted.

UNless you have ridden one and understand how the assistance works be careful of making assumptions - you will find at high speed sthe assistance is marginal and is not really impacting the effort put in as the bike can't do much at that speed - its mainly rider effort. Its no a motorbike - its deisgned for assistance at lower speeds. Above a certain speed its rider effort.

Now you need to maybe think she was pretty fit and strong and chooses to ride the bike for her reasons but could be a damn good cyclist and would be quite competent on a normal bike.

Ego's take a lot of bashing when that happens.

 

Edited by Paul Ruinaard
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5 minutes ago, Paul Ruinaard said:

Careful what you assume. The standard restriction on a Specialized Creo e road bike is 42 kmh. Once you go up above that it turns off. It doesn't mean you can climb at 42 KPH BTW. Just you will get some assistance up to that speed depending on your chosen setting.

However once you have the bike moving - even the e MTB which is limited at 32 KPH - its easy to stay with a bunch . I often have the bike completely turned off and am sitting  at 45 KPH in a bunch if we are on flat or in a tail wind  - they are easy to pedal like a non assisted bike as the motor drag is negligible so its not unlikely she was not being assisted.

UNless you have ridden one and understand how the assistance works be careful of making assumptions - you will find at high speed sthe assistance is marginal and is not really impacting the effort put in as the bike can't do much at that speed - its mainly rider effort. Its no a motorbike - its deisgned for assistance at lower speeds. Above a certain speed its rider effort.

Now you need to maybe think she was pretty fit and strong and chooses to ride the bike for her reasons but could be a damn good cyclist and would be quite competent on a normal bike.

Ego's take a lot of bashing when that happens.

 

Be careful what you assume that I assume

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Spot on Paul, the weight of the e-bike only really makes a difference on steeper drags. A fit rider could quite easily sit in a bunch on an e-bike, especially if it's a gravel or roadbike, which weigh somewhat less than the mountain bikes.

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1 hour ago, NotSoBigBen said:

It would appear that it's lost on most of the e-bike evangelists commenting that it's not about THEM ........ it's about derestricted bikes and the unfairly influencing of the results of Amish bike races?

Or do I have it wrong....

If this thread was kept on topic, then yes.

But there's plenty of "he's too fit to need an ebike" comments here, so yes you do have it wrong.

 

 

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1 hour ago, The Ouzo said:

I dont know about that, they seem to be rather touchy about defending their choice in this thread.

 

But each to their own. 

This mornings group ride we had a lady on an e-bike making sure the rest of us on amish bikes were as strong as we said we were. The fact that she was out front touching 50 kph tells me it was definitely derestricted. 

I admit it I am one guilty of being one of the touchy ones

 

I love my ebike .... but definitely wish I still had the option of sticking to the normal bike

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1 hour ago, BuffsVintageBikes said:

Spot on Paul, the weight of the e-bike only really makes a difference on steeper drags. A fit rider could quite easily sit in a bunch on an e-bike, especially if it's a gravel or roadbike, which weigh somewhat less than the mountain bikes.

 

Gearing make a HUGE difference here.

 

My Euro commuter spun out at 36+km/h.  Did a 1x11 conversion, with a 42 ring.  With the slightest downhill I get to 40 even 45km/h easily, and can keep it there until the road starts climbing again.  And this is on a lead-sled ....

 

Saturday I was averaging almost 34km/h until we turned at Malmesbury.  Hills at about 20 to 25 km/h, and making up the time on the levels and downhills.

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