Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'TransCape'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General
    • The Bike Room
    • Sponsored
  • New to Cycling
    • Ask Anything
    • What Bike to Buy
  • Gear & Bikes
    • Technical Q&A
    • New Gear
    • Buyer’s Advice
    • Post Your Bike & Projects
    • Bike Shops & Services
    • Retro / Vintage Bikes
  • Events & Training
    • Events
    • Pro Cycling
    • Training, Health & Nutrition
  • Riding
    • Group Rides
    • Routes & Trails
    • Share Your Ride & Travels
  • Discipline-Specific
    • Gravity
    • Fixie & Singlespeed
    • Commuter
    • Multisport
  • Safety & Awareness
    • Stolen Bikes
    • Cycling Safety
    • Fraud Alert
    • Lost & Found
    • Good Causes
  • Help Desk
    • Site Announcements
    • Help & Support
  • Off Topic
    • Chit chat

Categories

  • Adventure and Travel
  • Tips and Advice
  • Event and Industry News
  • Tech
  • Promotions
    • Custom Content Partnership

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Full Name

Found 19 results

  1. The ASG-Ellsworth pair set the pace in the UCI Men’s category from the start of the 73km final stage between Houwhoek and La Couronne Wine Estate to add a sixth stage victory to their tally. The ASG-Ellsworth team of HB Kruger (left) and Stuart Marais celebrate with Eldorette Carinus of La Couronne Wine Estate after winning the UCI Elite men’s category in the Liberty TransCape MTB Encounter today. The 73km seventh and final stage of the 614km race started in Houwhoek and finished at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek. Photo: Full Stop Communications In today’s stage, the French-German team of Antonin Marecaille and Julian Biefang (Chiru-Magura-Canyon) were second, followed by Hanco Kachelhoffer and Pieter Seyffert (Ellsworth-ASG). Kruger and Marais took the lead on the opening day and never looked back as they went about their business – completing the seven-day race in 19:32:36. In their debut in the race, they finished comfortably ahead of Eirik Fiskvik and Thomas Engelsgjerd of Norway (20:19:02) and Marecaille and Biefang (20:44:00). The Paarl-based Kruger said claiming the title in the 614km race was immensely satisfying. Stuart Marais (front) and ASG-Ellsworth partner HB Kruger (right) lead the bunch on the last day of the Liberty TransCape MTB Encounter today. The 73km seventh and final stage of the 614km race started in Houwhoek and finished at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek. Photo: Robert Ward “We came in with the big goal to win the race so we were very happy with the way it turned out,” he said. “Getting the stage wins were a bonus. “Luckily Stuart and I clicked well. We got a good partnership going and we really enjoyed riding together.” Kruger said the block of riding in the TransCape, which is supported by STANLIB and Volvo Cars, had fitted in perfectly with his programme for the year. “There’s a different dynamic to the TransCape because it gives you an excellent test while preparing you for the other big events.” He said he would be competing in two road races – the Bestmed Tour of Good Hope and Cape Town Cycle Tour – before heading to the Cape Epic, all of which take place in March. Marais, from Howick in KwaZulu-Natal, explained they had decided to go hard from the start of the ultimate stage, which set up their win. Norwegian professionals Eirik Fiskvik (left) and Thomas Engelsgjerd were second overall in the UCI Elite category in the Liberty TransCape MTB Encounter which ended today. The 73km seventh and final stage of the 614km race started in Houwhoek and finished at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek. Photo: Full Stop Communications “There was quite a lot of single-track and I went to the front from the beginning because I didn’t want to get stuck behind on that section,” he said. “Actually, the single-track section was a bit further into the stage than I thought, but the three main teams did manage to break away. “Up a climb one of the Norwegian guys was not feeling great, so they dropped off. “We rode with the French-German team and after the first water point HB went to the front and we managed to get away from them.” Marais, who concentrates on cross country racing, said he was now well set for the UCI Mountain Bike World Cup in Stellenbosch in March. “I am trying to peak for the World Cup. I’m looking forward to recovering from this and then to get in some speed work.” Germany’s Udo Mueller said he had “a fantastic week” as he, too, led from the start to secure the solo men’s title in 21:13:06. Germany’s Udo Mueller won the men’s solo category in the Liberty TransCape MTB Encounter today. The 73km seventh and final stage of the 614km race started in Houwhoek and finished at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek. Photo: Full Stop Communications He was followed home by Switzerland’s Roland Mueller (21:35:20) and Conway Oliver (22:10:56). The UCI Elite Women’s title went to Pretoria riders Janine Muller and Mari du Toit (Oakley4), who finished in 27:14:29. Pretoria riders Janine Muller (front) and Mari du Toit won the UCI Elite women’s category in the Liberty TransCape MTB Encounter today. The 73km seventh and final stage of the 614km race started in Houwhoek and finished at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek. Photo: Robert Ward The mixed category was dominated by British star Catherine Williams – who successfully defended her title – and Belgian’s Kristof de Neys for an overall time of 22:31:42. Britain’s Catherine Williamson (left) and Belgian partner Kristof de Neys won the mixed category of the Liberty TransCape MTB Encounter today. The 73km seventh and final stage of the 614km race started in Houwhoek and finished at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek. Photo: Full Stop Communications Results Stage sevenUCI Elite men 1 HB Kruger, Stuart Marais (ASG-Ellsworth) 2:50:16 2 Antonin Marecaille, Julian Biefang (Chiru-Magura-Canyon) 2:53:19 3 Hanco Kachelhoffer, Pieter Seyffert (Ellsworth-ASG) 3:08:17 4 Grant Usher, Yuki Ikeda (Topeak-Ergon-Sprocket & Jack) 3:11:25 5 Eirik Fiskvik, Thomas Engelsgjerd (Team Happysalmon) 3:14:49 UCI Elite women 1 Janine Muller and Mari du Toit (Oakley4) 4:10:38 Men’s team 1 Arthur McDuling, Fanie Venter (Business Print Oldies) 3:18:04 2 Louis Fourie, Francois Ebersohn (Linde & Viljoen Melkmanne) 3:20:10 3 Bruce Poole, Eben Espach (PEG) 3:20:10 4 Will Aymes, Waz Squires (NUK Orthodontic) 3:33:39 5 Richard de Villiers, Holden Marshall (Team STF) 3:33:40 Women’s team 1 Jeanette Treherne, Vivienne Turvey (Team T and T) 4:35:24 Mixed team 1 Catherine Williamson, Kristof de Neys (LawPack) 3:22:43 2 Donald Weir, Nicolle Weir (Weirdos) 4:14:06 3 Reinette Geldenhuis, Wolf Stinnes (Woolies Trance) 4:22:10 4 Victor Terblanche, Hildegarde Cronje (VictoryHill) 4:24:07 5 Wayne Albertyn, Catherine Albertyn (BigD & The Hammer) 4:40:46 Solo men 1 Udo Mueller 3:08:17 2 Roland Mueller 3:10:22 3 Conway Oliver 3:21:25 4 Massimo Mancini 3:22:34 5 Jose Frazao 3:25:55 Solo women 1 Jeanie de Villiers 3:48:50 2 Aryna Edwards 4:31:01 3 Jessica Knight 4:47:38 General classification UCI Elite men 1 HB Kruger, Stuart Marais (ASG Ellsworth) 19:32:36 2 Eirik Fiskvik, Thomas Engelsgjerd (Team Happysalmon) 20:19:02 3 Antonin Marecaille, Julian Biefang (Chiru-Magura-Canyon) 20:44:00 4 Hanco Kachelhoffer, Pieter Seyffert (Ellsworth-ASG) 21:12:04 5 Grant Usher and Yuki Ikeda (Topeak-Ergon-Sprocket & Jack) 21:48:30 UCI Elite women 1 Janine Muller and Mari du Toit (Oakley4) 27:14:29 Men’s team 1 Arthur McDuling, Fanie Venter (Business Print Oldies) 21:53:53 2 Louis Fourie, Francois Ebersohn (Linde & Viljoen Melkmanne) 22:11:05 3 Bruce Poole, Eben Espach (PEG) 22:17:07 4 Will Aymes, Waz Squires (NUK Orthodontic) 23:51:35 5 Richard de Villiers, Holden Marshall (Team STF) 24:07:51 Women’s team 1 Jeanette Treherne, Vivienne Turvey (Team T and T) 29:19:29 Mixed team 1 Catherine Williamson, Kristof de Neys (LawPack) 22:31:42 2 Donald Weir, Nicolle Weir (Weirdos) 28:18:54 3 Reinette Geldenhuis, Wolf Stinnes (Woolies Trance) 28:52:23 4 Victor Terblanche, Hildegarde Cronje (VictoryHill) 29:31:02 5 Wayne Albertyn, Catherine Albertyn (BigD & The Hammer) 30:52:43 Solo men 1 Udo Mueller 21:13:06 2 Roland Mueller 21:35:20 3 Conway Oliver 22:10:56 4 Massimo Mancini 22:14:04 5 Jose Frazao 22:58:50 Solo women 1 Jeanie de Villiers 25:39:21 2 Aryna Edwards 29:20:22 3 Jessica Knight 31:48:38
  2. Just had a quick look at some posts about the Cape Epic purchasing Wine2Whales and started thinking about the costs of stage racing... Here is a quick link to a Google spreadsheet if you're interested in adding to the list. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1_wf5OJzbYdcxKS_nkgJhvfUm87flBt_SWsBtOPSVaBU/edit?usp=sharing This is not a post about whether it is cheap or expensive or the Rand vs Dollar debate - more about an actual comparison of what these races actually cost. (Entry fee, excluding any of your incidental extras like travel, mechanic packages, massage etc.) Here is a quick summary of what I have so far... Rand for Rand the Joberg2C still provides great value for a longer event in terms of costs per kilometre at a low R64,51 for 2018 (With free coffee and magnificent food) and the Cape Epic topping out on R113.83/km (with plastic cups for water). *Disclaimer: Rates are as accurate as my 2 minute Google Search provided. Accommodation and food is based on my own experience and rating (No, I don't 'bant' and I like steak, pasta and beer - probably too much!) PS> I would love to compare some of these with the costs of doing an international race like the Trans Portugal or Trans Alp!
  3. Organisers of the TransCape mountain bike race have enlisted Cape Epic route designer Pieter van Wyk to ensure the 2018 route is a fun yet technical challenge. Click here to view the article
  4. The seven-day event, driven by Volvo Cars South Africa, will take riders on a picturesque 614km journey between Knysna and Franschhoek in the Western Cape from February 4 to 10. “The aim is to encourage more professionals to take part and my objective is not only to satisfy their needs, but to ensure the majority of riders are catered for as well.” According to Van Wyk, his plan would be to create easy-flowing tracks throughout that would be enjoyable rather than overly technical. “I think it is important to maintain a balance between fun and difficulty,” he said. “It isn’t too hard to achieve this. Having been involved in a lot of trail rides, I know how to judge the general ability of people and I always view it from a personal perspective. “If it’s too difficult for me, then I can’t expect the average person to ride it.” Van Wyk, who has been in charge of the Cape Epic route for the past three years, said input from ASG Events chief executive Wynand de Villiers would influence many of the changes for the next edition. “I will base my route alterations on feedback from Wynand, who rode in the event this year. He has a few changes in mind.” The process of implementing the anticipated changes was due to start within the next few months, he said. “The main route has already been planned. It’s purely a case of finalising the smaller details and adding the finishing touches. “Once we’ve started work, it shouldn’t take more than a month for everything to be completed.” He said the focus would be to lessen the number of open district roads which riders had traversed in the past. “What we want to do is make the race a lot more fun for the riders by getting them onto more farm roads and some single-track. “We’ll do this by taking out those long stretches of district roads, shortening some of the stages and making them easier, but adding a number of technical elements.” The route will visit many of the same towns as in the past, but Van Wyk said only the most scenic and memorable elements would remain. The route of next year’s TransCape, driven by Volvo Cars South Africa, will feature less district roads and more single-track. Photo: Jacques Marais “The race will pass through more or less the same towns as in previous years, but one major change is that Van Wyksdorp will fall away. “We’ll keep riders closer to the sea because this area provides far nicer riding opportunities with more trails. “Another change will come towards the end of the race. From Greyton, the route will head towards the Houw Hoek Inn near Grabouw rather than Villiersdorp.” He said the overall plan would be to make the race “fun and doable” for the average person. “This isn’t something as testing as the Epic, so people can come out and enjoy themselves. We’ll ensure the time on their bikes is manageable. “We will aim to make it a nice mountain biking experience for everyone rather than test them to their limits.” Entries are open. Visit www.transcapemtb.co.za for more information.
  5. After the lengthy 135km queen stage yesterday, it was a slightly shorter challenge as the field continued their seven-day, 690km journey from Knysna to Franschhoek. Travis Walker (right) and Pieter Seyffert, of Ellsworth-ASG, en route to winning the 81km third stage of the TransCape mountain bike race between Van Wyksdorp and Riversdal. The seven-day, 690km event between Knysna and Franschhoek finishes on Saturday. Photo: Jacques Marais. The 47-year-old Stelling, who is from Sea Point in Cape Town, completed the 81km in 3:09:12 to move into second overall on an aggregate time of 13:08:34. Belgian Karl Dossche held on to his overall lead after finishing second on the day in 3:19:38 (12:59:16). Third went to Willem Tollig in 3:19:53, but Alan Tilling’s ride of 3:26:02 (13:18:42) keeps him in third overall. Stelling injured his rib last Monday in an incident while moving house and said he almost did not make it to the start line. “However, I decided I would ride and have been taking a cocktail of tablets to manage the pain,” he said. “On the first day I just rode with a couple of mates and took it easy, but yesterday, because of the longer stage, I got into a faster group. “Even though I have not set myself a goal, today I wanted to race a bit harder as well.” Stelling said he would not put any pressure on himself and would just take it day by day to see how it all panned out. “The rib was a bit sore initially, but I have managed to alleviate the pain somewhat and it’s not feeling as bad as on the opening stage.” Stelling described the TransCape as a “brilliant journey”. “It is one of the top three races in my book. The atmosphere is great, the accommodation is fantastic and the food is brilliant. “I ride mountain bike races for the soulful experience and the vibe on this one is up there with the best.” Overnight leaders in the men’s team category, Pieter Seyffert and Travis Walker, raced to their third consecutive stage victory in 2:54:56 (11:45:06) to consolidate their position at the top of the standings. Belgians Eddy Feliers and Kristof de Neys, who represent Cicero Baik, held on to second overall with their ride of 3:16:25 (12:39:50). Third on the day went to Bromance’s David and William Wertheim Aymes in 3:19:52 (12:47:47), the same position they occupy in the overall situation. Ellsworth-ASG’s Seyffert said the race was proving an excellent examination of his new partnership with the 25-year-old Walker from Hilton in KwaZulu-Natal. “The first two days were a big test for us because we have different styles of riding,” said the 30-year-old from Helderkruin on the West Rand. “I don’t start the climbs as quickly as he does. He has speed while I try to keep it constant and then go harder over the top. “So he has now seen what my riding style is and I’ve experienced his,” said Seyffert. “They say you race like you train, so this is a very good opportunity to see how we gel and it is the best way to get to know each other.” Billy Stelling leads the Spar team of Catherine Williamson (centre) and Hannele Steyn during the 81km third stage of the TransCape mountain bike race that took riders from Van Wyksdorp to Riversdal. The seven-day, 690km event between Knysna and Franschhoek finishes on Saturday. Photo: Jacques Marais. Women’s pair Catherine Williamson and Hannele Steyn, who have opted to compete in the mixed category, won the stage in 3:09:13 ahead of Ian and Jane Seggie in 3:48:21 and Matthias and Denise Kubli in 4:07:13. Williamson and Steyn, who race for Spar, now lead the overall standings on 12:32:37, followed by the Seggies on 15:13:21 and the Kublis on 15:47:26. In the women’s solo category, Alma Colyn continued to extend her lead at the top of the standings when she crossed the line first in 3:19:55 (13:00:59). Second and third went to Mandy Langebrink in 3:44:23 (14:50:03) and Chandre Wertheim Aymes in 4:02:00 (17:13:41) respectively.
  6. Despite riding with a broken rib, defending men’s solo champion Billy Stelling won his second stage in a row on the third day of the TransCape mountain bike race between Van Wyksdorp and Riversdal in the Western Cape today. Click here to view the article
  7. Capetonian Billy Stelling forged ahead on a muddy day in the TransCape mountain bike race to win his third stage on the trot and don the leader’s jersey in the men’s solo category today. Click here to view the article
  8. Men’s solo leader Billy Stelling (front) expresses his feelings on a muddy fourth stage from Riversdal to Swellendam in the TransCape mountain bike race. The seven-day, 690km journey from Knysna will end at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek on Saturday. Photo: Jacques Marais Overnight rain turned the 103km fourth stage between Riversdal and Swellendam in the Western Cape into a ride that Stelling described as “very difficult” afterwards. The peloton, who will arrive at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek on Saturday after seven days and 690km of gruelling racing, faced the added challenge of almost 2 000m of ascent. The 47-year-old defending champion from Sea Point, who is competing with a broken rib that saw him start the race gingerly, finished the stage in 4:41:35 for an overall time of 17:50:09. Ellsworth-ASG’s Pieter Seyffert (right) and Travis Walker continued to set the pace in the men’s team section on a muddy fourth stage from Riversdal to Swellendam in the TransCape mountain bike race. The seven-day, 690km journey from Knysna will end at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek on Saturday. Photo: Jacques Marais Belgian Karl Dossche, who led since winning the opening stage, came home second in 4:52:25 (17:51:41) to drop one spot in the standings. He was followed by Alan Tilling in 4:56:56 (18:15:38), who remains in third overall. Stelling said he rode the last 55km on his own after pulling away from a bunch on the climb at Grootvadersbosch Conservancy. “I was riding with the front team (Pieter Seyffert and Travis Walker) for a while, but then I stopped to clean my bike in some water and waited for a group behind me. “I rode with them for a while until they fell off a bit on a big climb and I was on my own from there until the end.” Because of the conditions, Stelling said he did not set himself any specific goals for the stage, choosing merely to take it section by section. “The roads were very slippery and you couldn’t ride on the side, while the middle was a fine, powdery mud. “It is difficult in those conditions because the bike doesn’t function properly and you can’t ride as you would normally do. “Whenever I got to some water I used it to clean my bike and it would stay clean for about a kilometre. So mentally and physically it was hard.” Although he is in the lead, Stelling said his only objective was to take it one day at a time. “I’m not in the best shape I have ever been, but I do tend to ride myself into a race, so the longer it is the better I start feeling. At this stage, I’m not looking too far ahead.” Riding for Ellsworth-ASG, the men’s pair of Seyffert and Walker won their fourth stage in a row, crossing the line in 4:35:06 to lead the team standings on 16:20:12. Belgians Eddy Feliers and Kristof de Neys, of Cicero Baik, finished second in 4:52:22 (17:32:12) to consolidate their runners-up spot in the overall standings. Third on the day as well as overall were Bromance’s William and David Wertheim Aymes, who crossed the line in 4:59:21 (17:47:08). “Thanks to the conditions this was more of a mental struggle than anything else,” said the 30-year-old Seyffert. “In the thick, clay-like mud you were on the pedals the whole day,” said the pro from Helderkruin on the West Rand. “Even on the downhills it was difficult to freewheel.” Seyffert said the bunch stayed in their slipstream at the start on a flat road into a headwind. “But it was so muddy that we pulled away on a climb about 15km into the stage and we were lucky because we were able to see where the best lines were.” He added he had so much mud on his chain it kept on coming off in the first 40km so “we stopped at all the water points to wash and lube just to get through the day”. Despite a commanding lead, Seyffert was cautious about making any predictions. “You never know what can happen in a stage race because a broken wheel or broken chain can easily change everything. We will need to make sure we take it safely on the more technical sections.” Riding in the mixed category, Spar’s Catherine Williamson (front left) and Hannele Steyn (front right) led the overall standings after a muddy fourth stage from Riversdal to Swellendam in the TransCape mountain bike race. The seven-day, 690km journey from Knysna will end at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek on Saturday. Photo: Jacques Marais Competing in the mixed category, the Spar women’s team of Catherine Williamson and Hannele Steyn finished the stage in 5:08:25 to stay in top spot overall (17:41:02). They were followed home by Ian and Jane Seggie in 6:02:52 (21:16:13), with Matthias and Denise Kubli in third after completing the day in 6:22:16 (22:09:42). Spar’s Catherine Williamson forges her way up an incline on the muddy fourth stage from Riversdal to Swellendam in the TransCape mountain bike race. The seven-day, 690km journey from Knysna will end at La Couronne Wine Estate in Franschhoek on Saturday. Photo: Jacques Marais Solo women’s leader Alma Colyn won the stage in 4:57:48 (17:58:47) to extend her lead ahead of Mandy Langebrink, who came home in 6:02:52 (20:52:55). In third place is Chandre Wertheim Aymes who finished in 6:43:29 (23:57:10). Thursday’s stage will take riders over 112.5km and 1 542m of climbing between Swellendam and Greyton.
  9. Travis Walker (front) and teammate Pieter Seyffert (Ellsworth-ASG) lead the pack on Montagu Pass on the second day of the TransCape mountain bike race. The queen stage of the seven-day journey from Knysna to Franschhoek took the riders on a 135km ride between George and Van Wyksdorp. Photo: Jacques Marais The Ellsworth-ASG duo led the field home for the second consecutive day after a typically hot and dusty Karoo leg between George and Van Wyksdorp. They completed the 135km queen stage – the longest of the seven-day event – in 5:30:24 to lead the standings with a combined time of 8:50:10. Belgians Eddy Feliers and Kristof de Neys (Cicero Baik) hung on to their second place overall after placing second on the stage in 5:40:42 for a total time of 9:23:25. They were chased all the way home by David and William Wertheim Aymes (Bromance), who stopped the clock on 5:45:12 to remain in third overall on 9:27:55. After creating a decent buffer on the opening stage, the 30-year-old Seyffert from Helderkruin on the West Rand said they had planned to ride within themselves on the second day. The Ellsworth-ASG team of Travis Walker (front) and Pieter Seyffert consolidated their overall position at the front on the second day of the TransCape mountain bike race. The queen stage of the seven-day journey from Knysna to Franschhoek took the riders on a 135km ride between George and Van Wyksdorp. Photo: Jacques Marais However, his younger partner could not contain his competitive juices and they quickly opened up a gap on Montagu Pass where the gradient kicks up to 14 per cent in places. “Although the intention was to take it slightly easier, I got a bit excited going up Montagu Pass,” admitted the 25-year-old Walker from Hilton in KwaZulu-Natal. “Going up the pass the breeze was into us, so climbing was a bit slower than usual. About halfway up I rode to the front and from there we were by ourselves for the rest of the stage.” Tongue firmly in his cheek, Seyffert said he would speak to the organisers about the pace his partner was setting and for “always putting me in the hurt box”. “Jokes aside, he’s an awesome teammate, waiting for me on all the climbs. He rides from the front most of the way and I’m learning to pull myself inside out to keep up with him.” Seyffert, who will target the Cycling South Africa-sanctioned Bestmed Tour of Good Hope road race in the Cape Winelands next month, said the heat combined with the wind had made the lengthy stage a tester. “We had a headwind for most of the day, with a slight tailwind for the last 10 to 15km. It was very hot towards the end with the wind at our backs. Although Montagu Pass – which the peloton faced shortly after the start –was the major ascent on the day, Seyffert said the smaller climbs later on presented more of a challenge. “From about 80km onwards you get those district roads and rolling hills, which I found much tougher. And then, right at the end, the organisers have put in a nasty little 1km climb as a final challenge.” In the men’s solo category, defending champion Billy Stelling came through strongly to take the stage in 5:40:46 to move in to third overall with an aggregate time of 9:59:22. Belgian overnight leader Karl Dossche remained at the head of affairs after placing second in 5:51:23 for a total time of 9:39:38. Alan Tilling completes the overall podium on 9:52:40. Hannele Steyn (right) and Spar teammate Catherine Williamson (second from left) continued to enjoy the journey on the second day of the TransCape mountain bike race. The queen stage of the seven-day event from Knysna to Franschhoek took the riders on a 135km ride between George and Van Wyksdorp. Photo: Jacques Marais Britain’s Catherine Williamson and Hannele Steyn (Spar) lead the women’s category on 9:23:24 after finishing the stage in 5:40:40 and Alma Colyn heads the solo women on 9:41:04 after crossing the line in 5:44:54. Matthias and Denise Kubli won the mixed section in 6:55:49 to remain third overall on 11:40:13. Ian and Jane Seggie were second in 6:59:08 to retain their overnight lead on 11:25:00, with Craig Chidrawi and Charmaine Werdmuller third on the day in 7:06:56 to stay in second overall on 11:39:29. The third stage of 81km will take riders over two major climbs between Van Wyksdorp and Riversdal.
  10. After a rainy opening stage, riders were presented with different conditions today as pace-setters Pieter Seyffert and Travis Walker consolidated their overall lead in the TransCape mountain bike race. Click here to view the article
  11. The Ellsworth-ASG duo took control early on to cover the tough 80km ride between Knysna and Wilderness in the Western Cape in 3:19:46. Pieter Seyffert from Ellsworth-ASG was in top form on the opening day of the seven-day TransCape mountain bike race as he and team-mate Travis Walker set the pace on the 80km stage from Knysna to Wilderness today. Photo: Jacques Marais They were followed home by Belgians Eddy Feliers and Kristof de Neys (Cicero Baik) in 3:42:42, with David and William Wertheim Aymes (Bromance) crossing the line in third in 3:42:43. Their commanding performance on a day that took in almost 1 600m of vertical climbing will see the South African pro outfit take a handy buffer into tomorrow’s queen stage. Seyffert, who hails from Helderkruin on the West Rand, said their sizeable lead would allow them the luxury of not having to make the racing on tomorrow’s stage, which is the longest of this year’s event. He said they were building towards next month’s Bestmed Tour of Good Hope in the Cape Winelands and were delighted with their debut outing. “This is our first race together and it will be a good test to see what I have to do as Travis’s partner for upcoming stage races,” said the 30-year-old. “I have a feeling we will be pretty good together. We have had a great start and will build on that as we learn from each other.” After some heavy overnight showers, the riders faced a gentle drizzle through much of the stage, which took in sections of the well-known Seven Passes road – including Phantom Pass early on. Walker, who had recently returned to SA after racing in Europe, said while the weather made the route more treacherous in places, there was a positive side as well. “The rain can be good and bad,” said the 25-year-old, who has settled in Hilton in KwaZulu-Natal. “The roads were quite gravelly and sandy, so the rain meant they were not that slippery and there was no dust from any vehicles going past. “I don’t really mind the drizzle as I prefer it cooler than blazing hot. “On the other hand, some of the parts were very muddy and if you are not too careful you can go around a corner and slide on rocks or roots.” He added the conditions were also prone to causing mechanicals and said the bikes would be checked thoroughly afterwards to assess their condition. Catherine Williamson and Hannele Steyn (Spar) finished in 3:42:44 to take the lead in the women’s section. Hannele Steyn of Spar was delighted to lead the women’s category alongside Britain’s Catherine Williamson after the first stage of the seven-day TransCape mountain bike race that took riders over 80km from Knysna to Wilderness today. Photo: Jacques Marais The 34-year-old Williamson from North Yorkshire in Britain said she was thrilled to be riding with a partner after competing in the solo category last year. “When you ride solo, you have to go flat out and try to hang on to groups. “Riding with a partner is a completely different dynamic and Hannele is such an awesome rider with so much experience,” said the former Cape Epic champion. “We worked nicely together and she was always right on my wheel.” Belgian Karl Dossche found himself leading the men’s solo section in 3:51:23 after initially entering in the team category. “Unfortunately my friend had to withdraw because of family reasons so I went ahead to ride solo,” he explained. “Of course, it would be nicer if he was here, but I had a very good ride on a wonderful course. The rainy conditions were not too bad because in Belgium we are used to that.” Despite taking a wrong turn and adding several kilometres to her day, Alma Colyn completed the stage in 3:56:10 to take the lead in the women’s solo category. “It was an awesome route, even if it was wet and muddy,” she said. “Unfortunately, I took my glasses off at one stage to tuck them in my top and when I looked up I realised I was going straight instead of turning into the forest.” Colyn said she refused to panic and merely turned around to find the correct route. “All you can do is just pray and hope you see another cyclist or a sign board. I was very grateful to get back on track to enjoy an amazing event.” The second stage will take riders over a distance of 135km between George and Van Wyksdorp with 2 450m of ascent. The 690km event finishes in Franschhoek on Saturday. Provisional results:Men’s teams 1 Travis Walker, Pieter Seyffert (3:19:46) 2 Eddy Felliers, Kristof de Neys (3:42:42) 3 David Wertheim Aymes, William Wertheim Aymes (3:42:43) 4 Pierre Cloete, Graeme Cumming (3:53:01) 5 Reynard Tissink, Brandon Harcus (4:03:41) Women’s teams 1 Hannele Steyn, Catherine Williamson (3:42:44) Mixed 1 Ian Seggie, Jane Seggie (4:25:52) 2 Craig Chidrawi, Charmaine Werdmuller (4:32:33) 3 Matthias Kubli, Denise Kubli (4:44:24) 4 Michael de Coster, Yolanda Witteveen (4:58:13) 5 Simon Knutton, Sandra Johannessen (5:45:04) Men’s solo 1 Karl Dossche (3:51:23) 2 Alan Tilling (3:51:24) 3 Malcolm Dods (4:00:47) 4 Peter Hall (4:05:59) 5 James Whitehouse (4:05:59) Women’s solo 1 Alma Colyn (3:36:10) 2 Mandy Langebrink (4:18:35) 3 Nicola Geldenhuys (4:46:35) 4 Chandre Wertheim Aymes (4:52:18) 5 Susan Thornton-Smith (5:07:34)
  12. Despite wet conditions, Pieter Seyffert and Travis Walker kicked off their new partnership on a perfect note by winning the opening stage of the seven-day TransCape mountain bike race today. Click here to view the article
  13. Mountain biking pro Pieter Seyffert (front) will team up with Travis Walker to ride for Ellsworth-ASG in the seven-day TransCape mountain bike race from Sunday. Photo: Warren Elsom In his first appearance at the TransCape, the 30-year-old said he was looking forward to teaming up with Walker under the Ellsworth-ASG banner for the 690km journey between Knysna and Franschhoek in the Western Cape. Seyffert said he and Walker – who recently returned to South Africa after racing in Italy – had both been looking for team-mates after his long-time partner Hanco Kachelhoffer retired following their victory in the Sanlam MTB Invitational in November last year. “This is a new combination and we have never raced together,” said Seyffert, who hails from Helderkruin on the West Rand. “In fact, I don’t think I have even raced against him. “Travis is from a cross country background and I come from a road cycling background, so it will be interesting to see how we pair up. The TransCape will provide a good guideline for us.” Seyffert said he had spent the last two years focusing on improving his technical skills and added he was confident he had made a successful transition to mountain biking. Although he will be new to the TransCape, which is presented by ASG Events, Seyffert said he was familiar with the terrain, having ridden in most of the areas the route will cover. “There is a real buzz and sense of expectancy in the mountain biking community around TransCape. “Because of the exceptional organisation and the special trails many riders expect the event to surpass the current offerings on the mountain bike stage race scene in South Africa. “So, of course, I can’t wait to experience it.” He added that their goal was to “definitely go for the overall win”, but that they would take things one day at a time. “As with any stage race your equipment has to be reliable and if you don’t get a puncture and don’t break anything, you have had a good tour,” he said. “We will try to play it fairly safe early on and assess the opposition in the first couple of stages to see if we can find any weaknesses. Then you can try to put them under some sort of pressure, for example on climbs or descents. “We will not look too far ahead. We will finish day one before we look at day two.” Seyffert said he and Walker – a 25-year-old from Hilton in KwaZulu-Natal – had done a lot of base training and were in good condition. “We have also done some intervals, although those sessions have not been too intense at this stage.” Looking back on last year, Seyffert said one of the highlights was winning the Magalies Monster in Rustenburg in May. He also fondly recalled his last few rides with Kachelhoffer. “It was great to finish off in a few races with Hanco, who is a good friend of mine. Our very last race was the Sanlam MTB Invitational near Paarl, which we won, so that was very special.” Visit www.transcapemtb.co.za for more information. Stage by stage:Stage 1 – Knysna to Wilderness (80km) Stage 2 – George to Van Wyksdorp (135km) Stage 3 – Van Wyksdorp to Riversdal (81km) Stage 4 – Riversdal to Swellendam (103km) Stage 5 – Swellendam to Greyton (112km) Stage 6 – Greyton to Villiersdorp (68km) Stage 7 – Villiersdorp to Franschhoek (78km)
  14. After a lengthy association with Hanco Kachelhoffer, mountain biking professional Pieter Seyffert will reveal a new partnership when he and Travis Walker tackle the seven-day TransCape mountain bike race from Sunday. Click here to view the article
  15. Riders will face plenty of interesting challenges in the TransCape mountain bike race, particularly the new Greyton Black single-track section on stage six. Photo: Jacques Marais Positioned on the penultimate stage on the stretch between Greyton and Genadendal, route director Wayne Collett said the TransCape would be the first to use “this spectacular new section”, which extended the famous route network in the region. “It is destined to become one of the most unique and spectacular single-track sections in the country,” said Collett as he assessed the stages for the seven-day, 650km journey from Knysna to Franschhoek. He warned riders to ensure their technical skills were up to scratch as the 5km segment would test them to the full. “It is by far the most technical section,” he said. “I don’t want to make anyone nervous, but if you think the TransCape is about wide open spaces, think again. “This one is up in the hills and you need to know what you are doing, although it’s not that long – only about 5km.” While Collett and his team have introduced a number of changes designed to improve the experience for the riders, he said the Greyton Black single-track was the most significant addition. “People will spend a lot more time on that section now. What used to take you five minutes now requires about 45 minutes.” Besides the Greyton Black, Collett said there would be plenty to capture the riders’ attention during the seven days through one of the country’s most celebrated mountain biking regions. Naturally, he added, the queen stage would come as an early examination, confronting the riders on the second day. “Firstly, it’s the distance of 135km and secondly it is the stage with the most climbing. “There is over 2 000m of ascent, including one of the bigger climbs on the TransCape in the Montagu Pass, which comes at the beginning.” Collett said a third factor which came into play was the heat and he warned riders to ensure they were always properly hydrated. “As the queen stage is the longest in the TransCape, the heat does come into play because most of the riders will be out in the sun for a longer period. “So it’s all those factors together which conspire to make it the toughest day in the race.” He added that riders should be prepared throughout the event to handle the heat, which could rise above 40 degrees Celsius in some areas. “They will definitely get to those levels in some places and you have to make sure you have enough sustenance to get you through each day.” Collett said he did not think the wind would play that big a factor in a mountain biking event, although he added things could get tricky on the feature climb of the race at Groenlandberg. This comes on the seventh and final stage and provides the riders with the biggest ascent of the TransCape, which is presented by ASG Events. “Coming on the last day, Groenlandberg always has a say in what happens and because you are very high it can have a climate of its own up there. “So you can have a strong wind at the top and that can often make the descent slightly problematic.” For more info, visit www.transcapemtb.co.za. Route:Stage 1 – Knysna to Wilderness (80km) Stage 2 – George to Van Wyksdorp (135km) Stage 3 – Van Wyksdorp to Riversdal (81km) Stage 4 – Riversdal to Swellendam (103km) Stage 5 – Swellendam to Greyton (112km) Stage 6 – Greyton to Villiersdorp (68km) Stage 7 – Villiersdorp to Franschhoek (78km)
  16. The TransCape MTB race organisers will pioneer a fresh single-track challenge by introducing the riders to the Greyton Black section in the multi-stage race beginning on Sunday. Click here to view the article
  17. TransCape participants traverse some of the most scenic and rugged mountain biking terrain in South Africa. Photo: Jacques Marais The seven-day event across the width of the Western Cape will be added to the company’s repertoire of partnership events, which include flagship races such as the Bestmed Tour of Good Hope, Liberty Encounter Series and Sanlam MTB Invitational. ASG Events chief executive Wynand de Villiers said they were looking forward to building on the success story of the 675km endurance event. “It fits in nicely with our current offering for high net worth individuals in the mountain bike stage race sphere. “We believe strongly it will set the benchmark for seven-day stage races on the African continent.” With stages ranging between 70 and 130km, the event targets riders who have a measure of technical ability and who are looking to enjoy the experience. De Villiers said the route took in some of the most scenic but notoriously rugged and challenging mountain biking terrain South Africa has to offer. “It really is an incredible journey that will test your limits.” He said the TransCape was a full-service tour, which meant participants’ on and off the bike needs would be met throughout. “This includes on-road nutritional, technical and medical support, three meals a day, hotel and guest house accommodation and transfers between stages.” Race founder Lenore Collett said she started dreaming of a mountain bike event that would capture the incredible journey through what she termed “the most spectacular corner” of the country. “My vision was to create a premium event that delivers a stern challenge on the bike and a luxury experience off it. “We are proud of what we have achieved with our first two events, but we realised that we needed to partner with likeminded businesses to take our vision to the next level. “This is why I’m excited about the partnership with ASG. They have a wealth of knowledge and experience in event management and share our vision for the future. “I have no doubt that the TransCape is now well positioned.” The race, which starts in Knysna and finishes in Franschhoek, takes in the Garden Route, Klein Karoo, Overberg and Winelands regions. For more info, go to http://www.transcapemtb.co.za.
  18. ASG Events have acquired a controlling stake in the TransCape multistage mountain bike race, it was announced this week. Click here to view the article
My Profile My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Settings Help Logout