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Found 24 results

  1. So i love my wheelset. AMC Wide Lightning... had it for almost a year no, with zero incidents... no wobble, no popped spokes, no dents... just solid, light and I can run very low pressures. I was sad to hear the news of AMC's demise earlier this year https://www.pinkbike.com/news/american-classic-calls-it-quits-for-now.html... as I can't imagine not replacing my Wide Lightnings with anything else other than another set of Wide Lightnings. But, the AMC website seems alive and well? No signs of death? And we still seem to be selling their products online in South Africa?
  2. So my Google skills seems to be failing me and only able to get to a bike shop over the weekend... hoping for some solid BikeHub advice till then. Does anybody know of a way to fit standard AC Wide Lightning wheels (15x100) to a boost (15x110) fork? Can you convert the existing hub in some way or are there adapters available AND does anyone have experience with this / tried it?
  3. So as the title suggests am looking for some new boost wheels that will be light enough to pedal over distance but resilient enough to hand a few rock gardens and general trail riding. Weight and how they roll is as much a factor as I like to do distance as well as short fun stuff. The bike is boost which is another consideration. Actual boost hub's or the axle kit AC offer to make hub's boost compatible. Would rather not have boost but unfortunately the bike I wanted is. I can't see there is any perceivable difference between actual boost hub's and the axle conversion. Although some argue it's pointless having a boost bike and then just adjusting the spacing. I know in the real world I can't feel the difference . Have already ridden the bike with loan wheels that are boost hub's vs my wheels which are spaced . I will only be running 2.2 -2.3 rears and 2.3- 2.4 fronts if that has any bearing on my decision as the ac's are wide proper wide. Anyone who has ridden or owned either or both your input would be appreciated. As would anyone who wants to pass on some advice . Am leaning towards the smokin guns,what a freakin cool name . Oh and on a mid travel 9r Have put this out there instead of hassling MM ????????
  4. Hi all, I have a set of 650B American Classic wide lightnings on my Giant Trance. Really enjoy them. However, I notice that as I corner, there is a feeling of vibration/juddering almost as if the discs are touching the pads or something. The back end of the bike also feels a bit sketchy - like it's "loose". Anyone else experience this and have any idea what to do to resolve that?
  5. The statement from Cape Cycle Systems: To our IBD’s, retailers and loyal customersCape Cycle Systems has received a cease trade notification from American Classic dated 31 December 2017. The Company American Classic may be up for sale but this we can’t substantiate. All Warranty issues will be honoured and we do have stock for sale.
  6. The claimed weight for the Argent wheelset is 1,392g (390g per rim) which is all the more impressive considering the width (19.4mm internal and 22mm external) and the 30 mm depth. The Argents are built with American Classic's own bladed spokes, 18 radially on the front and 24 at the rear, laced 3-cross on the drive side and radial on the non-drive side with the rear wheel's spokes grouped in threes. The brake surface is machined aluminium with wear indicators to keep you safe. Features:Discipline: Road, Gravel, Cyclocross Rims: Argent Road Tubeless 390 gram Aluminum Clincher Rims 700 Spokes: AC Bladed Spokes Black, AC Aluminium Nipples Silver, 18h Radial Front, 24h 3-Cross Drive, Radial non-Drive Rear Weight Pair: 1,392g (Front 596g, Rear 796g) Rear Spline: Shimano/SRAM 10/11 or Campagnolo 10/11 Included: AC Tubeless Tape Installed, AC Tubeless Valves, Cromoly QR’s Optional Upgrades: Wheel Bag, Ceramic Bearings On the Road The Argent wheels were originally fitted with Specialized's 700x23/25c Roubaix Tubeless tyres that allowed me to run them at the maximum allowed pressure without sacrificing comfort, thanks to the wider profile. The Roubaix later made way for a set of Bontrager R3 TLR 700x24 tubeless ready tyres, for no reason other than wanting to try out another tubeless set of tyres. Although I have not suffered a single puncture since April. It has been noticeable how longer the Bontrager tyres stay inflated, needing fewer air top-ups to keep them at an optimum running pressure. With the generous internal width and the ability to run lower pressures (when tubeless), the wheel and tyre combo offered exceptional comfort on uneven surfaces and longer rides. Over smooth tar the bigger contact patch felt stickier and confidence inspiring with better stopping power as a bonus.The cam-actuated, six-pawl freehub makes a satisfying noise while coasting and yields good engagement compared to higher-end offerings from some other manufacturers. Jump on the pedals and they surge forward and maintain momentum well. Running the brake blocks right up against the wheel shows some flex under heavy load, although it is more evident through the rub rather than feeling flexible under foot. Descending a pass at speed shows no sign of strain both in terms of flex and its ability to hold momentum well and, paired with the grippy tyres, make for a very fun and rewarding ride. The 30mm depth handles Cape Town's gusts very well with no ill-manners while riding in crosswinds. Overall the performance is top-notch with the Argents having been a fit and forget affair and excellent at tackling any terrain and riding condition. Verdict "Strong, light, cheap - pick any two", so the saying goes. At 1392g for this R9,995.00 wheelset that is rated to carry a 107kg rider to the finish line, the American Classic Argent wheelset bucks that wisdom. Add tubeless, a wide (19.4mm internal) profile, and disc compatibility to the specification list and you have a winner on your hands.Their tubeless nature is a genuine confidence boost , especially on our roads that are littered with broken glass and potholes. ProsLight, affordable, strong Tubeless ready High rider weight limit for a wheelset this light Great value Versatile (can be used for road, gravel or CX) ConsSlightest bit of flex under heavy load, no signs of it through corners though
  7. Hi Hubbers Dont miss out on our Monday Madness deals today! 1.American Classic Argent Road Tubeless Wheelset - RRP R10 995 now only R7 495!! Link is here: https://www.evobikes.co.za/american-classic-argent-road-tubeless-wheelset.html
  8. Hi Hubbers Don't miss our Monday Madness Items!! 1. Shimano M8000 XT 11-Speed Upgrade Kit (11-42T) - R3695!!! https://www.evobikes.co.za/shimano-m8000-xt-upgrade-kit.html
  9. Hi Hubbers, I have recently been looking into a new wheelset. I saw the AM Smoking Gun wheels at CWCycles the first time a couple of months back. Then already I thought they were quite amazing. My question is does anyone have a set? Has anyone ridden a set? How are they? Would it be better to go for the Wide Lightnings which also come at a better price? As I understand it though the wider you go the better the ride gets. According to several reviews they are quite amazing. The next set I but might become my only set so I would like to buy versatile quality wheels. I have also looked at a set of Arch MK3/Hope Pro 4. Had Arches previously and quite liked them. Any advice, reviews and opinions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks http://bikemob.co.za/2016/04/18/american-classic-smokin-guns-welcome-to-plush-sized-wheels/ http://www.cwcycles.co.za/product/american-classic-smoking-gun-wheelset http://www.cwcycles.co.za/product/american-classic-wide-lightning-29er-wheelset http://www.cwcycles.co.za/product/ztr-29r-arch-mk3hope-pro-4-wheelset https://www.evobikes.co.za/wheels/wheelsets-mtb/new-2016-american-classic-smoking-gun-29er-tubeless-wheelset.html https://www.evobikes.co.za/wheels/wheelsets-mtb/american-classic-wide-lighting-29er-tubeless-wheelset.html
  10. With availability in both 27.5" and 29" models and a new carbon spin-off called the Carbonator, there's a model for just about any bike and budget. The 32 hole rims are build 3-Cross Front and Rear into a wheelset using their own 14/15 gauge spokes and aluminium nipples. Claimed weight for the set is 1569g which is very competitive. The Wide Lightnings feature the same basic driver mechanism as used on other American Classic wheels. The ratchet teeth are integrated directly into the one-piece aluminium freehub body while a steel cam plate simultaneously engages and disengages six aluminium pawls depending on whether you're pedaling or not. The advantage to using aluminium all the way through is an incredibly light rear hub, 225g, according to American Classic. The disadvantage is the ratchet teeth have to be bigger than usual to withstand the applied forces. This results in a slow 15-degree engagement. The argument for wider rimsWider rims can dramatically increase the volume of a given tire by increasing the distance between the bead seats. Wide rims also have the additional benefit of increasing the sidewall support. This results in a more stable tyre - especially at lower pressures which in turn leads to better traction, out-right traction under load, braking traction and comfort. Momsen Mount Graham 29x2.20" tyre mounted on an Alex Rim DH19 rim. Momsen Mount Graham 29x2.20" tyre mounted on a Wide Lightning. By gaining traction and grip through a wider rim a rider would not necessarily have to run a bigger or gripper tyre, meaning a lighter tyre can be used. As an example: You're riding Schwalbe Racing Ralphs, but find them a bit skiddish in front. Usually you would look at fitting a Rocket Ron or maybe a Nobby Nic to get the grip and confidence you're looking for or you would run a wider tyre in front. By running wider rims this wouldn't necessarily be needed. On the Trail The Wide Lightnings feature a 29.3mm internal width and a 32mm external width. I recently spent time on the Momsen Mount Graham tyres for a review. After about 3 months of use, I started toying with the idea using a grippier front tyre instead. While I was looking around at some options, I changed my wheelset to American Classic's Wide Lightning and decided to move the front and rear tyres across to get an idea of the effect of the wider rim. For reference, the Wide Lightning measures 29.3mm internal and 32mm external vs the AMC MTB 29 Tubeless which is 21mm internal and 26 external.What a difference those 8.3 internal millimetres make. For starters, I could run even lower pressures than I usually do for extra grip and traction and not sacrifice confidence caused by the tyre rolling on it's carcass. Secondly the extra width of the rim gives the tyre tread a less rounded profile with less of a drop-off on the sides, giving the tyre a bigger contact patch. This makes the transition from the centre to the side knobs more predictable and further boosting confidence. On the Wide Lightnings, the Mount Grahams proved themselves capable of trail riding with ease and reached it's limits much later. The American Classic Wide Lightning rear hub setup for single speed gearing. Keen to see what the effect would be on a more trail orientated tyre, I swapped the front tyre for a Vee Crown F. I usually run somewhere between 20-23PSI front and 25-28PSI. Again I could pump it up with 5PSI less than usual when mounted to the Wide Lightnings.My only complaint would be the slow engagement of the rear hubs. By no means terrible, just not in tune with modern offerings and definitely something that takes getting used to. Even more so when there's an Industry Nine hub on my other bike. Pedaling up technical single track takes some careful planning and requires consistent pedaling - something that's not always possible on tricky sections. Once up to speed though, there are no complaints. Also, I haven't Enduro'ed them, but I would imagine that with a 2.7mm wall thickness they will be too thin to bash day in and out. I have had them on three 29" bikes (Steel Single Speed, 100mm Dual Suspension race bike, Trail 29er) and they were comfortable doing duty on all three. The extra cushioning of the lower pressures were welcome on the single speed, the low weight (especially when factoring in tyres as well) was welcome on the race bike, While on the trail 29er they took whatever was thrown at them in their stride. After months of use they are still true and dent free and haven't needed any TLC. VerdictOne always has to remind oneself with reviews to put personal preference aside and see something for what it is or meant to be. In this case, however, I feel comfortable to call the Wide Lightnings game changers. Until you've tried wider rims for yourself there's no way to properly describe the impact it has without sounding like hype or that you've just spent too much time in the sun. When I got my first set of Wide Lightnings, I did not think such grip, traction and comfort was possible at this weight. They are definitely very good as XC, Marathon and trail wheels, and are more than happy to play out on the trails without the worry of breaking - not something that can be said of other race wheels. Besides, where can you buy one wheelset that will cover so many bases and look good doing it? Get out there and drink some of the wide rims cool aid. The American Classic Wide Lightning wheelset has a RRP of R7,800. Should your Local Bike Store not have stock, new stock will be arriving in June. Manufacturer's specifications: DisciplineMTB | Cross Country | Enduro ''RimsMTB Wide lightning Tubeless Aluminum Disc Rims 29” Spokes and nipplesAC 14/15 gauge Spokes Black | AC Aluminum Spoke Nipples Silver | 32h 3-Cross Front and Rear Weight front727g Weight rear842g Weight pair1,569g Front Hubs / SpacingDisc 130 100 mm | 15 mm Thru Axle Disc 100 mm | 9 mm Thru Axle Disc 100 mm | Lefty Disc 100mm Rear Hubs / SpacingDisc 225 135 mm | 10 mm x 135 mm Thru Axle Disc | 142 mm Thru Axle Disc | Shimano/SRAM 9/10/11 or SRAM XX1 IncludedAC Tubeless Tape Installed | AC Tubeless Valves Quick releaseCromoly QR's UpgradesCeramic Bearings | Titanium QR's | Wheel Bag Thru Axle QR's Brake interface6 Bolt International Standard
  11. Although not the first to launch properly wide rims, American Classic's Wide Lightning were the first to offer extra width in a light and strong rim. Billed for anything from XC to Enduro, we put them to test to see for ourselves how they hold up after months of real-life use. Click here to view the article
  12. Hi Hubbers Our Cycletour Sale is in full swing so don't miss out! Head over to our Cycletour Sale page for some great deals!! https://www.evobikes.co.za/cycle-tour.html Garmin Edge 520 GPS Bundle - R5 395
  13. Hi Hubbers Our Festive Deals are now on for as long as stocks last. Take a look here at all products available: http://www.evobikes.co.za/festive-deals.html Products to be added throughout the festive period.
  14. Hi Guys Im looking at possibly spending R10k on a wheelset for my road bike, depending on what the insurance pay out. It will be replacing my Mavic Ksyrium SSC SL wheels. Ill use the wheels everyday, training and racing. Ive do also have a set of 45mm carbon rims still waiting for hubs which will eventually be just for racing. I was thinking of getting a cheaper wheelset and the hubs with the change perhaps. Looking at getting Hope RS Mono hubs, DT 240s is slightly outa budget. The training/wheels need to be fit and forget type setup. Fulcrum racing 3 Mavic Ksyrium Elite Mavic Cosmic Campag Zonda American 420 Shimano RS81 HELP!
  15. Hi there, I'm currently in the market for a new wheelset, obvious choice would be a carbon set, but that is way to expensive. My options are: * Roval Alloy * American Classic Wide Lighting * ZTR Crest / Archex / Flowex American Classic Race Hope you guys can help.
  16. 1. Giant Trance 2 Based on its popularity, it comes as no surprise that the Giant Trance 2 tops our list. We found the Trance 2 to represent excellent value for money while being a fast, agile and capable trail-muncher that will happily do a race (XC, Marathon or Enduro) when called upon. 2. Garmin Fenix 3 First runner up spot belongs not to Miss Columbia, but to the Garmin Fenix 3. In the conclusion we wrote "the fenix 3 is a beautifully designed, solidly built and ultra connective smart sports watch". We liked it so much the test unit stayed at Bike Hub HQ. 3. Silverback Sprada The Silverback Sprada 2 completes the podium for 2015. The Sprada is a 29er trail bike that features 120mm of fork travel and 110mm of rear suspension travel in an all alloy frame sporting Silverback's own IDS Revo suspension technology. It was our first encounter with their Advanced Riding Dynamics (ARD) philosophy of bike spec and came away impressed with the end result. 4. RockShox Revelation Updated for 2014 with a Solo Air air spring and available in a variety of wheel sizes and travel options to please most trail riders, the Revelation RCT3 is RockShox's do-it-all trail fork. Improved over the years, the Revelation has grown into a solid option for many a bike thanks to its stiffness, low weight and on-trail feel. 5. Forca SPS 400 The Forca dropper seatpost is a low tech, mechanical adjustable seatpost that is available to purchase through Cycle Factory Shop's online store. During testing we found the Forca SPS-400 is definitely a viable option in the current dropper seatpost market as it offers a reliable, easy to repair dropper seatpost at a suitably affordable price. The only chink in its armour was the need to sit down on the saddle to bring the spring into life and raise the seat again. 6. Momsen Mount Graham Tyre The Momsen Mount Graham is a collaboration between Momsen Bikes and Arisun to launch a South African specific casing under the Momsen Bikes banner, specifically designed for our XC and Marathon race conditions. For under R500 (when the review was done) Momsen gave us a tyre that is light, durable and inexpensive. 7. Lauf Trail Racer 29 Not ones to shy away from trying something new, we gave the Lauf Trail Racer 29 a good go. Not your usual suspension fork, the Lauf is inspired by leaf suspension and uses carbon shafts and twelve composite springs to suspend the front axle to offer 60mm of travel but at a weight of around 990g in the version as tested. 8. Mio Cyclo 505 HC Taking on the big guns at their game is not an easy task, but Mio did just that with the launch of the Cyclo 505 HC. After rigorous testing we found that as far as premium level bicycle GPS computers go, Mio have done an impressive job to offer a good performing and good value product. 9. American Classic Wide Lightning wheelset Although not the first to launch properly wide rims, American Classic's Wide Lightning were the first to offer extra width in a light and strong alloy rim. 10. Lapierre Zesty Rounding out the Top 10 is the Lapierre Zesty AM427. The Zesty AM we tested had Lapierre’s OST+ (Optimized Suspension Technology), a Horst-link suspension design which was first launched in 2008 with input from Nicolas Vouilloz. The bike was slightly let down by it's fork (Fox 32 Float Performance) and tyres (Schwalbe Nobby Nic front and rear) as it wanted to give more when the going got fun.
  17. Of the gear review articles that we published in 2015, these are the ten that have drawn the most attention. Click here to view the article
  18. Hi guys. I want to get some opinions on the Stan's ZTR Flow Ex rims built onto Hope Hubs vs American Classic Wide Lightnings. I know the AC Wide Lightnings weighs around 1569 including rim tape, which is ridiculously low seeing that they're 29mm wide internally. I don't know what Hope Pro 2 Evo + ZTR Flows weigh, but it's not really the weight that will get my attention. How is the AC hub compared to a Hope Hub? How much maintenance would the two require? I'm around 107kgs and not at all a contender in any race, but would really like a wheel where the tyre does not roll over the rim and where it can handle my weight. I want the Toyota Hilux of bikes.. Which wheels would that be? Please also include any other contenders, the aim is value for money, not the best looking wheel that fails after a couple of rides... For now (and I'll keep a pro/con list updated) ZTR Flow + Hope: Pro - More options visibly, due to AMC only being available in brownish on blackHope's hub, which is known for ease of servicing and durabilityPriced R6499 (if same price as Crest or Arch Ex)No rider weight limitCon - I presume they will be heavier than Wide LightningHand built somewhere which may or may not be stronger than the mass produced Wide Lightnings25mm internal width1871g (only an issue if you're a weight weenie)Unknown - All adapters cheap and could be includedWarranty (if any) American Classic Wide Lightning: Pro - Tubeless tape installedTubeless valves installed1512g per setInternal width of > 29mm!!! Con - Not available as rim onlyOnly brownish on black rim available which may not match the rest of your bikeOnly available as a wheelset, thus no other hubs availableDifficult to source in SA, particularly at a discount to RRPMore flex than Flow, particularly if you're a heavier riderComplaints of slow freehub engagement on older setsSome complaints about the rim being dented easily, however where this happened it did not affect ride quality Additional items - Adaptability - Qr, 15mm, 20mm, 142 vs 135 unknown107kg rider weight limit No rider weight limit I have to put a disclaimer here, this is just things I think I know, not facts, and the purpose of this thread is to get input into ANY wheelset that can match this weight/durability at the most affordable price. Again, we're looking for the aftermarket wheelset that matches most fatties or intermediate riders that wants bulletproof wheels at the best bang for buck. If you feel there's other wheelsets I need to include, list them and I'll read up on them a bit...
  19. So I'm saving up for a new set of wheels and I'm looking at the American Classic 29er wheels as I've heard great things about them. I ride XC/ Marathon and I'm not competeing for a podium but I do push for my best possible time. I weigh around 62kg and I want the wheels to last and be really solid as I don't the money to have them trued every second month. I'm looking at either the American Classic Wide Lightning or American Classic Race, so which isit worth the extra for the Race and are they as strong?
  20. Hi guys, I'm looking for some advice on which road wheelset would best suit me as a rider. Background: I've been using an entry level shimano wheelset for the past 7 years and would like to replace them with something a bit better. I'm a light rider @ 65kg's, enjoy climbs and am weak on the flats. I'm looking at the second hand market (around R4500) and am keen on either: Mavic Ksyrium Elite American Classic 420 Aero | 3 I will be using these wheels for training and racing. I only race a couple of times a year and can't justify 2 wheelsets. Will the aero profile of the AC improve my riding on the flats? Does anyone have experience with both of these wheels? What is the quality like of the two brands? Any advice is welcome
  21. As one of the latest mountain bike wheels to go hookless, the Carbonator rim uses a much thicker spoke bed and rim wall for great impact resistance and durability. When head engineer Bill Shook was experimenting with wheels made from carbon and aluminium, he found that aluminium rims can be built with thinner rim walls for an overall lighter weight as the rims can deal with multiple dents and dings without compromising their integrity. Carbon, on the other hand, needs some extra material to ensure functional durability and safety. Once he increased the wall thickness they offered excellent dent resistance, stiffness and strength - making them a perfect candidate for a light and stiff Trail / Enduro type wheel, where abuse and repeated hits are the order of the day.Featuring thicker sidewalls and 1mm wider outside profile than the aluminium Wide Lightnings (33mm vs 32mm outside, 26mm vs 29.3mm inside) to ensure durability, strength and stiffness. That extra material comes at a weight penalty of just 100g, making these one of the lightest, properly wide wheelsets available today at 1676g for the 29" set. Built with American Classic Disc 130 and 225 hubs, laced to the 32 hole rims using 14/15g DB spokes and aluminium nipples front and rear. The wheels allow for standard QR or 15mm/ 142×12 thru axle configurations, with an XD driver available to run SRAM's 11 speed. Build quality is top-notch and doing away with the white and gold graphics certainly gives them a more premium look. On The Trail I hit the trails already convinced of the benefits of wider rims following my time on the American Classic Wide Lightnings and Derby carbon rims. Noticeably stiffer than the aluminium Wide Lightnings, the Carbonators help keep wheel deflection in check and tracked sketchy terrain well.Getting them up to speed does not take much effort and they tend to respond best when hammered hard. My only complaint would be the slow engagement of the rear hub. By no means terrible, just not in tune with modern offerings and pedaling up technical single track takes some careful planning and requires consistent pedaling - something that's not always possible on tricky sections. Once up to speed though, there are no complaints. This set has done duty on more than one bike and are still running true and straight with not a single ding or mark in sight. Fitting tires has proven fairly effortless and various tires used during our test period inflated without hassle. Verdict Whether you're willing to spend good money on a set of carbon mountain bike wheels is for you to decided. What I can say is that these offer good value for money, and should you decided that carbon wheels are the way to go, these will not disappoint. Wide(er) rims are the way of the future making "standard" rims feel archaic and out of place on a modern mountain bike. The American Classic Carbonator wheels are light, stiff, well made and have excellent local back up. If their Wide Lightnings are anything to go by, they should be durable too. Specifications: RimsCarbonator Tubeless All Carbon Disc Rims 27.5 / 29" SpokesAC 14/15 Gauge Spokes Black / AC Aluminum Nipples Silver 32h 3-Cross Front and Rear Weight 27.5" Front 740gr | Rear 855gr | Pair 1595gr Weight 29" Front 784gr | Rear 892gr | Pair 1676gr Hubs/SpacingFront Disc 130 100 mm / 15 mm / Thru Axle Disc 100 mm / 9 mm Thru Axle Disc 100 mm Rear Disc 225 135 mm / 10 mm x 135 mm Thru Axle Disc / 142 mm Thru Axle Disc / Shimano/SRAM 9/10/11 or SRAM XX1 Brake interface6 Bolt International Standard PriceAround R18,500.00 American Classic MTB tubeless tape installed and tubeless valves included.
  22. Following the success of their Wide Lightning wheels launched a couple of years ago, American Classic set out to design and build a carbon version. Click here to view the article
  23. Hi all I'm looking for two of those black steel comb shims "I'm sure they have a name" that fits onto the freehub. Some how 2 have gone missing off the free-hub...mmmm And now the cluster creeps over the guide rails. Does any one have an old American classic free-hub body lying around that can part with the two spacers/shims thanks
  24. Featuring thicker sidewalls and 1mm wider outside profile than the aluminium Wide Lightnings (33mm vs 32mm outside, 26mm vs 29.3mm inside) to ensure durability, strength and stiffness. That extra material comes at a weight penalty of just 100g, making these one of the lightest, properly wide wheelsets available today at 1676g for the 29" set. Built with American Classic Disc 130 and 225 hubs, laced to the 32 hole rims using 14/15g DB spokes and aluminium nipples front and rear. The wheels allow for standard QR or 15mm/ 142×12 thru axle configurations, with an XD driver available to run SRAM's 11 speed. Build quality is top-notch and doing away with the white and gold graphics certainly gives them a more premium look. The Carbonator wheelsets are available in 27.5" or 29" and come pre-installed with American Classic's tubeless tape. Skewers and tubeless valves are included in the box. Recommended retail price for a complete set is R18,500. Specifications: RimsCarbonator Tubeless All Carbon Disc Rims 27.5 / 29" SpokesAC 14/15 Gauge Spokes Black / AC Aluminum Nipples Silver 32h 3-Cross Front and Rear Weight 27.5" Front 740gr | Rear 855gr | Pair 1595gr Weight 29"Front 784gr | Rear 892gr | Pair 1676gr Hubs/SpacingFront Disc 130 100 mm / 15 mm / Thru Axle Disc 100 mm / 9 mm Thru Axle Disc 100 mm Rear Disc 225 135 mm / 10 mm x 135 mm Thru Axle Disc / 142 mm Thru Axle Disc / Shimano/SRAM 9/10/11 or SRAM XX1 Brake interface6 Bolt International Standard American Classic MTB tubeless tape installed and tubeless valves included.
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