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Found 8 results

  1. I use Garmin ANT+ HR and Cadence sensors on my bike and would like to see these readings on apps whilst training indoors. As I understand, there are 2 options being either an ANT+ dongle (plugs into a computer via USB port) or a bridge ("CABLE" by NPE being 1 option) which does not have to be plugged into any device but is controlled via a separate app. The bridge seems more versatile as it can connect whilst using IOS, Android or Windows devices. Any shared experience would be appreciated.
  2. Get ready to RUMBLE! We know you are tired of riding shoulder to shoulder with Aussies and Kiwis - that is why starting this Wednesday 19:35, its time for you South African Zwifters (Zaffas) to come out fighting! Wednesday night kicks off our “Fight Night” on Zwift, a 1- 1 ½ hour race (dependent on the course) specifically for us South Africans. Yes, we are going to have to let in a couple of Aussies, Kiwis and any nationality that doesn’t understand the difference between now, just now and now now……but we really want that screen filled with South African flags! How? I’ll get to that now now. Our Chief Torturers from our national PainCave.co.za clubs will join you in this race series and ensure there is at least some pain. The PainCave “Fight Night” race runs for 25 weeks with your best 10 races counting towards final standings and possibly even some great prizes courtesy of BuyCycle.co.za and paincave.co.za The format of the race series will be based on age and not watts/kg. If you don’t have access to a smart trainer at home, head off to www.paincave.co.za and book a slot at any of our studios for the Wednesday night “Fight Night” – there will be a couple of FREE slots available at each studio (first come first served……chat to them now!) https://zwift.com/events/view/64197 We will be adding more details over the next couple of days and weeks….so keep on heading back to check the latest news. This is a series organised and run by Zaffas for all you Saffas! NOTE: While Zwift is sorting out European GDPR regulations for Zwiftpower.com we will not be able to display a leaderboard. We are however confident that this will sorted out soon. So no prizes until this is sorted out, only bragging rights. Be quirky, be fun, be lekker. Enjoy the race!
  3. Hi all, As the title suggests, I'm thinking about getting a smart trainer. We have a great little gym at our apartment building, but some chop keeps breaking the training bikes and I can't get decent training sessions in... From my limited research, the best entry-level options seem to be Tacx Satori or Flow smart trainers. Could anyone share some insight on the other pieces of the puzzle I'm not considering and their general experience with a cheaper smart trainer? I'm worried that "goedkoop koop is duurkoop" will come back to haunt me.
  4. Good day All you hubbers, yesterday I came across a youtube video showing how you can use a Garmin 520 to control a smart trainer, can anyone confirm is a Edge 130 would be able to do it as well?
  5. Morning all, To those who use the Tacx Utility app, have you noticed that the Calibration option has been removed with the latest update? Comments in the Play Store about this c0ckup are plentiful. How do I calibrate my trainer now? I do calibrate the trainer in TR after a 10 minute warmup, but experience proves that the trainer must be calibrated in the Utility app after a warmup.
  6. Good morning Hubland, This is a very particular query I have, but humour me. I started training with power in approx January 2017 in preparation for the then LeTape Tour. I continued training with power using a Wattbike in my (then) local VA. The crowded atmosphere in the VA detracted me so I decided to go the smart trainer route. Having now used the smart trainer for some weeks I can categorically say that the Wattbike and (this particular) smart trainer are not the same. The most simple away to distinguish between the two is my RPE. Put even simpler - it feels easier to do a certain wattage on my smart trainer than it did on the Wattbike. My HR is an indication of that too. I am aware HR has a lot of variables including temperature, how well you slept, how well you ate, how hydrated you remain etc. etc. I only used the "fan" setting on the Wattbike, only the magnet on the rare occasion when I had to go 350W+ for LOW cadence. Is it at all fair to compare the two? Should I just discount all my training I did on the Wattbike (in excess of 2500km)? Am I actually doing myself a disservice by using a smart trainer? Just to answer some questions I know will appear - I never (re)calibrated the Wattbike for each session (no clue how that was even done) I hardly ever used the exact same Wattbike due to space issues at the VA I always calibrate before my ride on my IDT I use the same bike each time (on the IDT) with about 7 bar pressure I calibrate using the Tacx Utility App and TrainerRoad Thanks for reading!
  7. BKOOL indoor trainers is coming... ​We are proud to announce that we are receiving our first shipment of the Bkool Smart Pro and Bkool Smart Go trainer next month, We are giving you the chance to secure yours by Pre-ordering your trainer. Our aim is to give you a smart trainer that won't cost you a arm and a leg. The Bkool Pro will retail for R8499 and the Bkool Go will be retailing for R6999 If you have any questions, Please leave a comment below :-) BKOOL PRO BKOOL GO
  8. Feature overview:Claimed noise level at 20 mph is 64 decibels Quick release (130mm & 135mm) and Thru-axle compatible (142mm & 148mm) Dual ANT+ FE-C and Bluetooth 4.0 technologies 9 kg flywheel with electromagnetic resistance Rated to handle 2000 watts at 20 mph and up to 20% climbing grade simulation Weighs in at 21.3 kg +/- 3% accurate power readings Virtual training software compatible Retail price: R21,995.00 At just over 21 kilograms, the Hammer is a heavy piece of equipment. The built-in handle does it’s best to make the machine maneuverable. I was able to haul the Hammer around the house as well as to the office and back in relative comfort. Being a cyclist, my upper body and core strength really are not what they should be, but I managed without much fuss. Aesthetically, I found the Hammer to be somewhat industrial but pleasing to the eye. It did not look out of place in my spare room / workout studio / bike storage facility. With the legs folded away, the Hammer can be stored out of harm's way or out of sight, should you invite normal human beings around, and don’t want to have to explain your eccentric habits. Setting up Getting started with the Hammer is simple. Before jumping on, you will need to deploy the support legs which slide out from the sides of the trainer. Doing so reveals the front wheel block which sits tucked away neatly within the belly of the machine. The legs can be further adjusted with dials to ensure perfect stability. The Hammer is a direct drive trainer. This means that you replace the rear wheel with a cassette that is mounted to the trainer. This makes the trainer quieter, removes tyre wear, and improves the feel of the trainer experience. A cassette is not included. Once the bike is on the trainer, it is time to plug in the power and connect to the CycleOps Virtual Training app for calibration. Connecting to the CycleOps Hammer on my Android phone via Bluetooth was effortless but finding the calibration setting took some fiddling around the app. Hint: It appears when you select to start a ride. Calibration should take around a minute as you pedal up to around 30 kmph for 20 seconds, then allow the device to spool down. The Hammer measures your speed and power output. As the Hammer can communicate via ANT+ and Bluetooth, it will happily pair to your computer, smartphone, or bicycle computer. Any other training metrics will have to come from other sensors. So if you want your cadence and heart rate (or any other measurable), it will need to be supplied via a third party sensor to your training device.In my case, I used my MacBook Pro to run Zwift. The Hammer connected via the built-in Bluetooth, but to connect my Garmin cadence and heart rate sensors to the MacBook, I had to use an ANT+ dongle. Training on the Hammer Other than briefly trying out the CycleOps Virtual Training app, I spent most of the review period riding around in Richmond, London, and Watopia on Zwift. In Zwift, I used the standard workouts in ERG mode as well as taking on other Zwifters in races.So what’s all the fuss about smart trainers? Smart trainers not only measure your power but they are able to receive instructions from software to control the trainer's resistance. This can be useful in two ways: ERG mode and simulation mode. Firstly, for precise training. When in ERG mode the trainer is set to a target power number for the rider to obtain. In this mode, you can simply stay in one gear while the trainer adapts to the required resistance. For structured training, this mode can help you precisely hit power numbers in a way that you simply cannot out on your bike. In workouts, where your trainer software is aiming to hit a power target, the Hammer prefers to place you in a power band (around 15 watts within that target) rather than at the exact power number. This requires the rider to fine tune their effort to hit the target number. Some other trainers are more precise and assist the rider to hit the exact power reading. The Hammer’s approach is more similar to intervalling on a real bike. There are advantages to hitting the right numbers but I liked the Hammer’s more variable feel as it requires a bit of concentration to maintain the power number. The transition between hard intervals and recovery phase was relatively smooth, with only a few seconds of spinning out before the trainer readjusted to the much lower power output levels. While ERG mode creates the perfect artificial training experience, the second use does the opposite in that it attempts to simulate the feeling of riding outdoors. Simply put, the smart trainer can adjust to the gradients and conditions of a virtual course as if you were riding it outdoors. Zwift is the stand out example. When you hit a climb or rough terrain in Zwift, you immediately feel a ramp up in resistance as you would in the real world. With the rise of games like Zwift that, to some extent, try to replicate the experience of riding a bicycle outdoors, the riding feel of the trainer has become an important consideration. There are certain constraints to the realism factor, such as being in your living room and motionlessly staring at a screen, but as riding feel goes, the Hammer was impressively realistic. The Hammer packs a large 9 kg flywheel which is controlled with electromagnetic resistance. This combination is central to the smooth feel of the trainer and a good sensation of inertia. When free riding and racing in the Zwift, the Hammer was sensitive to climbs and descents, doing a good job at delivering a realistic representation of what I was viewing on the screen. It is worth noting that CycleOps’s own Virtual Training app is feature filled, and as manufacturer apps go, it is highly useful as a standalone training solution. Indoor trainers can be noisy, causing annoyance to the rider, co-habitants, and even neighbours. The latest batch of direct driver trainers has made great strides to reduce this irritation. The Hammer is not silent but the noise it produces is far less invasive than on wheel trainers and direct driver trainers before it. During high power intervals, the deep hum is loudest but it is no louder than the sound of the bike's drive train. Those in the next room will hear your workout but only the most sensitive will be disrupted by it. In the end The CycleOps Hammer is an excellent trainer holding its own amongst the top trainers in this category. While smart trainers are certainly not cheap, devices like the Hammer certainly add a whole new level to your training and when plugged into an application like Zwift, they simply cannot be beaten. ProsEasy to use Smooth adjustment of power Good connectivity Good simulation of real life feel ConsGetting into the smart trainer game doesn't come cheap.
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