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Found 17 results

  1. The Pyga Stage is available in three variants: There is the endurance racing orientated Stage (as reviewed) and the longer travel more trail inspired (although still stage race ready) Stage Max. There is also a lesser talked about in-between model often referred to as the Mini-Max. The Frame The Pyga Stage frame is an all carbon affair designed by South Africans with the specific needs of local racing firmly in mind.At the time of its launch, the Stage was ahead of the curve in terms of geometry design. Cross-country bikes were one of the last class of mountain bikes to embrace the longer, slacker geometry trend. Since then, many large brands have found the courage to take the leap. Pyga’s vision was to create a stage racer with confidence inspiring angles so that the average rider (you and I) could be more confident and comfortable on a bike while still capable of racing endurance events. Looking back, the Stage launched at a tricky time for bike designers. The Boost hub axle spacing standard had yet to be widely adopted. Pyga made a decision to stick with the 142 rear axle spacing but with the implementation of Plus Five. Plus Five re-engineers the rear end to correct what Pyga sees as a flaw in bikes: the chainline offset. What they have done is offset the whole rear end of the Stage by 5mm on the drive side and in doing so reducing the chainline offset from 49mm to 44mm. The result (simply put) is better shifting thanks to a more centred chainline and a stronger rear wheel as the spokes can be more evenly dished. There is provision for a combination of internal and external cable routing. I have the brakes going externally with the rear derailleur running internally, popping out at the bottom bracket area briefly before entering again at the chainstay. My dropper post followed the brake hosing down the underside of the down tube around the bottom bracket and into the seat tube after the shock mount. The Stage has a direct mount for a front derailleur. As an acolyte of the single chainring drivetrain, I did not test the bike with a double chainring configuration. On Pyga’s own builds, they currently only specify the bike with a single chainring and with the introduction of SRAM’s 12-speed drivetrains, the reasons to go 2x are becoming sparser. I would not be surprised to see a future model of the Stage going one-by specific to make space for an improved frame and suspension design. The build Our Stage features components from the GX SID build kit. There is also a top specification XX1 Eagle build with carbon cockpit parts.The imaginatively named GX SID build features a full SRAM GX drivetrain with Guide RS brakes, a RockShox SID fork and Monarch shock with SRAM Roam 40 wheels. I firmly believe that unless you’re overly weight conscious, the SRAM GX groupset offers the best value for performance in SRAM’s 11-speed and 12-speed range. The SRAM GX platform performs just as well as the X01 and XX1 drivetrains, with the slightly increased weight and reduced bragging rights being the most obvious drawbacks. The new RockShox SID RLC, with the Charger damper technology used in the Pike, has been a revelation. The changes to this latest iteration have resulted in a fork that is set and forget, providing smooth and reliable travel. The SRAM Guide RS brakes have been known to struggle in the South African heat, but the set on the Stage have proved to be reliable. On one occasion, they required some cleaning to get the piston to reset correctly. The now discontinued SRAM Roam 40 wheels have proven to be more than up to the task. The Onza Canis tyres round off a sensible build, providing good grip and reliability. Changes over the year Pyga did very well to put together a component package that leaves no single part unworthy of its place. But even the most ingenious build selection can not account for personal preferences. I have made a few adaptions to the Stage to suit my taste. The Pyga Stage in its original form. I’m dependant on a dropper seatpost to pilot a mountain bike over anything but the most manicured trails. I’ve tried re-adapting to a rigid seatpost but I simply cannot descend comfortably with a saddle in the way. As the GX-build Stage arrived with a fixed Kore seatpost, I swiftly ordered a Lyne Contour dropper seatpost to replace it. I easily routed it through the port in the seatpost and under the bottom bracket. The cable path does mean that there is rub on the bridge connecting the chainstays. I simply placed a protective pad to prevent any harm to the carbon frame. I also replaced the Kore Durox saddle with my preferred width Specialized Power saddle. Depending on your taste, the white saddle could be considered an eyesore but it is what I had, plus you can’t really see it when using the bike.I made use of two sets of tyres, Specialized’s FastTrak and the Onza Canis tyres that the bike arrived with. The Onza Canis tyres deliver a bit more grip which better suited my riding style and the bike’s capabilities. After a few hours in the saddle, my hands and the RaceFace Half Nelson grips generated friction. Although not a huge issue, the prospect of long days at Cape Pioneer Trek finally got me to change them for a pair of Supacaz Siliconez XL foam grips. While we’re talking comfort, I also tested the Spirgrips for a couple weeks on the Stage. Finally, I tested SRAM’s GX Eagle drivetrain with the Stage. A straight swap with the 11-speed GX system already on the bike. The larger cassette range meant that I could upsize the chainring to a 34 tooth chainring. The 34 tooth chainring is apparently a sweet spot for the bike’s anti-squat (which is designed to accommodate a double chainring drivetrain), in theory, making it a more efficient climber. On the trails The general feel of the Pyga is one of stability and confidence. The bike does, at times, lack a sense of edge and urgency that many other cross-country bikes exhibit. But do not confuse this feeling for sluggishness. The Stage is a deceptively fast bike.The suspension tune plays a big part in the Stage’s overall feel. The Pyga Stage suspension remains uncharacteristically active under pedalling, for a cross-country bike. It does not come standard with a remote lockout and that is because Pyga firmly believe that it is unnecessary to lockout the Stage’s shock. Pyga Euro Steel have apparently done their own testing and they are satisfied that there is little cause to have a remote lockout on their bikes (Don’t believe me? Then check out Phil Buys’s Cape Epic bike). Although I did reach down for the lockout switch on occasions, I found myself doing it a lot less than I had expected. Despite the feeling and movement of an active suspension, the bike remains efficient and responsive with the added benefit of improved grip and comfort. For both fast-paced XCO racing and stage racing I favoured the open or pedal setting over the lockout. Even with tired legs on day 6 of Cape Pioneer Trek and tackling the infamous Swartberg pass after 80 kilometres that day, I happily pedalled to the top with the suspension unlocked. On Pyga's recommendation, I set the shock at around 30% sag which worked well for me. Riding the bike with less sag meant that I struggled to get full travel while riding with even more sag when messing around on the trails produced really fun results (more like the bigger brother Stage Max). While the Stage can climb with the best of them, it is on the descents where the Pyga spirit shines through. Pyga's practical approach to the race bike means that the Stage is composed on the descents, outshining many of its competitors. For most amateur riders, this will mean greater confidence and fun on the trails, and hopefully less crashes compared to a more traditional cross-country bike design. As a rider who enjoys the downs more than the ups, I thoroughly appreciated being able to get away with some tomfoolery on the Stage. Photo credit: Tania HorsfordPhoto credit: Nicole Dale Kuys I’d highly recommend considering pairing the Stage with a 120 mm fork, the rear end has lots to offer and I felt like the 100 mm SID ran out of playfulness way before the rear end was done. Rumour on the street is that there might be 120 mm SID next year, otherwise, a Fox 34 or Pike is an excellent consideration for those looking for a do-it-all racer. In terms of racing, I tested the Stage across disciplines participating in Western Cape XCO series and completed the Cape Pioneer Trek. While my results aren’t exactly stellar, I feel that my needs fall firmly within the scope of the general South African amateur racing market. The Stage served well on the fast-paced and technical XCO courses where the Pyga approach to racing paid off with improved confidence (with the assistance of the dropper seat post) on the technical areas while being able to easily match my competitors (albeit it at the tail end of the race) on the climbs. The Stage’s comfort and composure comes into its own in multi-day marathon racing along with its sturdiness and reliability. When the going gets tough, the Stage cockpit is a reassuring place to be. Although only a sample of one, I have not had a single issue relating to the frame. The build kit is equally up to the task performing without even the sign of a hiccup. The second bottle mount under the top tube offers an easily accessible and super important second water source. The end The unassuming Stage gets on with the job, crushing miles and trails with easy making it an excellent race bike for pros and amateurs alike. The Pyga Stage is confidence inspiring and fast with levels of comfort that make it a perfect bike for long South African marathon races. It might not be the edgiest feeling race bike but don’t be fooled, the Stage is quick. Specification list (as the bike stands now): FramePyga Stage with 100 mm rear travel (Extra Large)Rear ShockRockShox Monarch RT3ForkRockShox SID RLC 100mmHeadsetCane Creek Forty SeriesStemKore 70 mmHandlebarKORE Mega 760 mmGripsSupacaz Siliconez XLSaddleSpecailized Power 143mmSeatpostLyne Contour 120mmSeatpost clampDeedBrakesSRAM Guide RSRotorsSRAM Centreline (180mm front; 160mm rear)ShifterSRAM GXRear DerailleurSRAM GXCassetteSRAM GXChainSRAM GXCrankSRAM GXWheelsetSRAM Roam 40TyresOnza Canis 2.25Retail priceR74 999 Find out more: To learn more about the Stage and other Pyga bikes, visit the Pyga website here.You can also follow the latest news from Pyga on the following channels: Facebook - Pyga Industries Twitter - @PYGABikes Instagram - @pygabikes
  2. First bike in history to achieve the season opening triple crown with Team Pyga Euro Steel: Winner 2017 ABSA Cape Epic African Jersey! Winner joBerg2c! Winner sani2c! An opportunity to own the identical race winning machine as used by the record-breaking Phillip Buys and Matthys Beukes and be part of the best bike buying experience ever offered in South Africa. This exclusive offer will be limited to 10 bikes only. https://www.facebook.com/Pygabikes/videos/vb.263376197044450/1368442613204464/?type=3&theater The offer includes:The same race winning machine as used by our Professional race team. Meet, ride, and spend the weekend with the team and legendary bike designer, Patrick Morewood on an exclusive weekend in the legendary Karkloof area. Receive racing, training, set up and skills tips from the whole crew. Custom fitment and set up by the Pyga crew All meals and drinks included. Flights from JHB/CPT Int airports to King Shaka Return shuttle from King Shaka airport to 11 Karkloof Accommodation Full catering for the entire stay Outrides Friday afternoon, Saturday and Sunday morning Post weekend bike service and courier to client’s door. Pyga/Liquimoly gift pack Wholesale offers on Kalas Team apparel, Sidi shoes, and Nike riding glasses Bike Specifications: FrameSTAGE with Rockshox Monarch RT3 rear shock/Maxle Ultimate 142x12mm rear axleForkRockshox SID World Cup carbon 100mm travel /oneloc sprint remoteHeadsetCane Creek 40 seriesCranksetSRAM XX1 Eagle 175mm cranks 34t (Please specify your personal crankarm length)ShifterSRAM XX1 EagleCasssetteSRAM XX1 Eagle GoldChainringSRAM XX1 Eagle 34TDerailleurSRAM XX1 Eagle GoldBrakesSRAM Level UltimateRotorsSram 160mm CLX front and rearRimsDEED Propel CarbonHubsWhite Industries CLD hubsTyresMaxxis IkonHandlebarsRitchey Carbon WCS Flat GripsESI foamStemRichey WCS (Please specify required length from 70mm to 110mm)SeatpostRitchey Carbon WCSSaddleRitchey WCS Skyline*Custom Team Vinyl decals which are replacable, allowing you to keep your bike looking fresh for years. TOTAL PRICE: An all inclusive package - R135 000 (incl. VAT). R50 000 deposit secures the purchase. (Normal retail for the entire package would be R180 000).Prospective buyers can contact Pyga directly on hilton@pygaindustries.com or call Hilton Frost on 072 0199470.
  3. Fittingly, Pyga bikes are designed in South Africa, for South African terrain, and features modern geometry, such as a slacker head angle and longer reach to make riding on technical terrain more comfortable. The Plus Five system ensures the best possible chain line for 1x drive trains. The Pyga Stage has a full carbon frame with space for two bottle cages inside the front triangle. You can read our full review here. The now-familiar gold of SRAM's XX1 Eagle drivetrain transfers power, while a Stages Carbon GXP power meter, measures those all important watts. The suspension is taken care of by the RockShox SID World Cup fork and the RockShox Monarch RT3 rear shock. Philip has removed the remote lockout from the fork. Deed Propel carbon rims are laced to White Industries CLD hubs, and wrapped in Maxxis Ikon 2.2 rubber. Deed is a brand created by Pyga to bring quality components to their higher specification builds for better value. The Propel is the cross-country offering (there are three wheels with different riding purposes in the range) with 28 offset spoke holes, a 22 mm internal width, and a claimed rim weight of 355 grams. A Liqui Moly Tyre Fix Aerosol is taped to the carbon Ritchey seat post. Full Specifications FramePyga StageRear ShockRock Shox Monarch RT3, 100 mmForkRock Shox SID World Cup 100 mm, 46 mm offset, lockout removed HeadsetCane Creek 40StemRitchey WCS 100mmHandlebarRitchey WCSGripsESI GripsSaddleSyncros XR 1.0SeatpostRitchey Carbon WCS Seatpost clampDeed BrakesSRAM Level UltimateBrake RotorsSRAM CLX 160mmShifterSRAM XX1 EagleRear DerailleurSRAM XX1 EagleCassetteSRAM XX1 EagleChainSRAM XX1 EagleCranksetSRAM XX1 Eagle, 36TPowermeterStages Carbon GXPRimsDeed PropelHubsWhite Industries CLDTyresMaxxis Ikon 2.2, EXO 120 TPIAccessoriesPlugs, LiquiMolyBottle cageSpecializedPedalsLook S-track
  4. In April 2015, we huddled excitedly around a mysterious cloaked bike from Pyga Industries. We knew that under the black cloth sat an all new carbon marathon machine. As the craft beers flowed speculation grew wilder and the stories taller until Patrick Morewood unveiled the Pyga Stage to us, and the world. Click here to view the article
  5. Matt

    Review: Pyga Stage

    The Stage is Pyga’s take on what a marathon / cross country bike should be. A longer reach and slacker head angle to provide more stability in corners and on technical descents. Pyga came out swinging with an ultra-progressive geometry. At a time when slack in XC terms meant a 70 degree head angle at best, the Stage, at 68.5 degrees, turned some heads. Fast forward twelve or so months and we see some of the major bike manufacturers following suit with their cross country / marathon line-up. The longer and slacker formula is fast becoming the new standard for cross country bikes with Pyga on the leading edge of this new wave. To the delight of all marathon racers, the full carbon frame supports two bottle cages, one mounted on the underside of the top tube and another in the standard downtube position. Along with their twist on geometry, Pyga also introduced the “plus five” chainline concept. The bike’s rear end is offset by 5mm towards the drive side to allow a better chainline resulting in improved shifting performance and less wear on your drivetrain. In order to achieve this the rear wheel is dished evenly providing a bonus of added stiffness and strength to the wheel. Other smart touches include a removable front derailleur mount to provide two-by versatility and a super clean frame when running one-by. Internal routing further accentuates the smooth, clean lines which define the frame. Specifications Most commonly known as a custom build frame kit company, with the Stage model Pyga introduced some “factory spec” builds: a top end SRAM XX1 / Rockshox RS1 / Monarch XX / PYGA Carbon wheels and a lower spec SRAM GX / Rockshox SID XX / Monarch XX / SRAM Roam 40 wheels. Although our test model is not strictly a factory spec build, it features a smattering of components common on both builds: most notably the same Rockshox SID XX 120mm up front and Rockshox Monarch XX as on their second tier build, a SRAM XO 11 speed groupset (arguably on par with the XX1) and the PYGA 29” carbon wheels. On the trail Climbing aboard the Pyga Stage for the first time does take some getting used to. Coming from a typical marathon bike the Stage is noticeably slacker, yet the lengthened top tube (622mm on the Large model as tested) means the position is very familiar and still suitably aggressive. The key change lies in the feel and response of the steering thanks to the slackened head angle. The more stable feel initially came across as being a bit cumbersome at slow speeds in comparison to the Stage’s more twitchy competitors. Very soon though, I was embracing the stability and security it offered.Despite the more “trail” feel the Stage climbs impressively well. In full lockout you can smash away at the pedals eeking out every watt with hardtail-like efficiency. For most climbs though, the suspension platform offers a fine balance between traction and limited energy loss when opened up. Facing tricky rocky climbs the unweighted front end helps to quickly pop up over obstacles. On seriously steep climbs though I did find my position required a more aggressive adjustment than usual to ensure enough weight over the front wheel to keep in contact with the ground. On technical trails, steeper descents and anything with a bit of speed the tweaked geometry really comes into it’s own. The slacker position and longer top tube places you comfortably within the cockpit rather than precariously on top of it. With less weight over the front wheel I had far more confidence in steep drops and comfortably glided through technical rocky sections. The 120mm up front does provide a little extra breathing room compared to the many 100mm peers in this class, adding to the confidence you carry when tackling anything tricky. The Pyga Marathon29 carbon rims and Onza Lynx tyres did a lot to help the stability and comfort on rough terrain. With a 24mm internal diameter the Marathon29’s offer a few extra millimeters over typical rims in this category which, coupled with the 2.25” Onzas, provide heaps of stability and traction. For marathon or cross country racing you’d possibly want to look at a lighter, faster rolling tyre as the Lynx are on the heavier end of the scale, perfect as an all rounder, but the weight is noticeable on longer climbs and open roads.When it comes to corners the Pyga Stage doesn’t disappoint. Even with my seatpost jacked right up to marathon standards the bike feels incredibly agile, yet planted through turns and berms. Again the long and slack design along with the low standover height pay dividends. There’s just a natural balance and low feel to the bike which enables you to carry speed and maintain traction through tight turns. Verdict Leading the charge into an era of ultra capable cross country and marathon bikes, PYGA have proven with the Stage just how firmly their finger is on the pulse of modern mountain bike design. The Pyga Stage offers a delicate balance of race focussed performance and more progressive trail capabilities. All in all a highly versatile package which can see you comfortably through a marathon stage race and still keep you smiling on a weekend trail ride with mates. If you've only got room for one dual suspension mountain bike, the Pyga Stage could be just the right pick.
  6. While the Stage might sport an efficient 100 mm of rear travel, the rest of the bike is not exactly a traditional XC machine. In designing the Stage, Pyga looked to make a bike that can be raced competitively at the sharp end, but still provide the average man and woman with a comfortable and confidence inspiring platform from which to push their endurance limits. It's largely the geometry that makes the Stage so versatile - a slacker head angle and longer reach with a shorter stem. Something that the major manufacturers have only just starting delivering on their XC race bikes. Our test bike is fitted with a 100 mm SID although the bike is equally at home with a 120 mm fork. With this set up, the head angle is around 69 degrees with a healthy 475mm reach. +Five A standout feature on the Stage is the Pyga's +Five chain line concept. A re-engineering of the rear end to correct what they believe is a huge flaw in bikes, the chainline offset. What they have done is offset the whole rear end of the Stage by 5mm on the drive side and in doing so reducing the chainline offset from 49mm to 44mm. Why the change? When the 49mm chainline offset was introduced mountain bikes were using 8 speed cassettes. The measurements then meant that the chainline was centred but as 9, 10 and 11 speed cassettes were introduced the centre chainline has shifted. The result on an 11 speed drivetrain with a 49mm offset is that the centre chainline is out by two gears. If that a bit confusing, all you really need to know is that +Five promises better gear shifting, less component wear, and a stiff, stronger rear wheel. Build kit This bike represents the "GX Build" specification level with (you guessed it) a SRAM GX drivetrain. A RockShox SID RLC with the Charger Damper (very excited to try this out) pairs a Monarch RT3 shock on the rear. The SRAM theme continues with Guide RS brakes and the excellent Roam 40 wheelset wrapped in Onza Canis tyres. It is a solid selection of components with no one part likely to underperform. With the Stage, Pyga say their focus was on stiffness, even at the cost of a few grams here and there but they have not done badly with weight. Even with the robust GX specification level on an extra large frame, the full bike (excluding pedals) comes in at 11.77 kg. It would be interesting to see how low that figure can go with a smaller frame, lighter drivetrain, wheels and tyres, and some carbon cockpit components. I will be putting the Pyga Stage through its paces at the remainder of the WP XCO Series, the odd 100 miler, and hopefully a stage race or two. But most importantly, after many years of envy, I can finally participate in the "Post your Pyga" thread Specification list: FramePyga Stage with 100 mm rear travel (Extra Large)Rear ShockRockShox Monarch RT3ForkRockShox SID RLC with OneLoc remote 100mmHeadsetCane Creek Forty SeriesStemKore 70 mmHandlebarKORE Mega 760 mmGripsRaceFace Half NelsonSaddleKORE FazeSeatpostKORE TorsionSeatpost clampDeedBrakesSRAM Guide RSRotorsSRAM Centreline (180mm front; 160mm rear)ShifterSRAM GXRear DerailleurSRAM GXCassetteSRAM GXChainSRAM GXCrankSRAM GXCrankSRAM GXWheelsetSRAM Roam 40TyresOnza Canis 2.25Retail priceR74 999 Find out more: To learn more about the Stage and other Pyga bikes, visit the Pyga website here.You can also follow the latest news from Pyga on the following channels: Facebook - Pyga Industries Twitter - @PYGABikes Instagram - @pygabikes
  7. The Frame The biggest deviation from conventional design is what Pyga are calling Plus Five. A re-engineering of the rear end to correct what they believe is a huge flaw in bikes, the chainline offset. What they have done is offset the whole rear end of the Stage Max by 5mm on the drive side and in doing so reducing the chainline offset from 49mm to 44mm.Why the change? Patrick Morewood explained that when the 49mm chainline offset was introduced mountain bikes were using 8-speed cassettes. The measurements then meant that the chainline was centred but as 9, 10 and 11-speed cassettes were introduced the centre chainline has shifted. The result on an 11-speed drivetrain with a 49mm offset is that the centre chainline is out by two gears. No need to worry about a new standard though, Pyga have emphasized that Plus Five is not a new standard, as all they have changed is their frames. The hubs, axle width, and wheels (aside from a change to the dishing) all remain unchanged. What are the advantages of the Plus Five chainline offset?Better shifting: The centred chainline and less harsh chain angles improve shifting. Poor shifting is often blamed on the drive train manufacturers, when Pyga feel that as frame designers and engineers they should take responsibility by improving the frame design. Less component wear: They were also concerned about excessive wear when riding on the 11th gear (the “granny”) on a 1x11 system. When riding the Stage Max in your 11th gear the chainline is equivalent to being in your 9th gear on other bikes sporting a 49mm chainline. This significantly decreases the angle at which the chain engages the front ring in the top gear. Improved rear wheel strength: Plus Five also means that the rear wheel is no longer dished, with spoke length being equal on either side of the wheel leading to improved wheel strength. Heading out on my first ride, I was a surprised by how well the medium frame fit me. I couldn't find any markings and thought the guys must have made a mistake and sent us a large instead. It was only when I got home and looked at the bike's geometry online that I realized that the medium Stage Max has a healthy reach of 430mm, putting it closer to some large frames out there. The only thing I would like to see tidied up is the routing of the cables on the underside of the bottom bracket. They seem to be quite exposed and it looks a bit untidy, especially considering the clean lines of the rest of the bike. Specifications Full Carbon fiber frame and rocker 29" wheels 126mm rear travel / 140mm fork Can take 2 water bottles inside frame +FIVE chain line concept Sizes: M, L, XL Internal and external routing for all cables including a shock lock-out. Components Pyga have really nailed the component choice of the Stage Max "GX PIKE RC" build on our test bike. It features a full SRAM GX 11-speed drivetrain with a 32T chainring. The only personal change I would make is to swap out the fairly thin Race Face Half Nelson grips for something with a bit more squish. Other than that, every piece of kit deserves its place on the bike. Shifting was good and the impact of the Pyga's +FIVE chainline offset was noticeable, with less cross chain when in granny gear. The fork is a Rockshox Pike RC with a 140mm travel and, as one would expect from a Pike, its performance was top notch.Full Specification List: FramePYGA Stage MaxRear ShockRockShox Monarch RT3ForkPike RC 29 140mmBrakesSRAM Guide RSRear DerailleurSRAM GX 1x11ShiftersSRAM GX 1x11 TriggerCranksetSRAM GX 1400 175 32TBottom BracketSRAM BB Pressfit 89.5mmCassetteSRAM XG 1175 10-42ChainSRAM PC1170 11SWheelsetSRAM Roam 40 29"TyresMaxxis Ikon 29x2.25 (Tested with Onza Ibex 29x2.25")HeadsetCanecreek CC ZS44/ZS56HandlebarKORE Mega riser 760mmStemKORE Cubix 50mmGripsKORE Ikon Lock On GripSaddleKORE Durox SaddleSeatpostSRAM Reverb Stealth 125 30.9Weight as testedActual Weight: 12.25kg (Size Medium as tested) On the Trail Bike ridden onBottelary Hills Green and Red Loop starting from Zevenwacht Meerendal Jonkershoek Red & Neverending Story The 760mm handlebar and 50mm stem places the rider in a commanding position and, thanks to the healthy reach, there is enough breathing space to move around. Climbing is good with little to no sign of bob or any pedalling inefficiency, which allowed me to keep the shock fully open for most of my rides. The more enthusiastic marathon riders may opt to run some form of pedalling platform as it does firm the rear up and, perhaps more importantly, makes the bike sit a little higher in its travel. Despite never feeling super fast, the Stage Max took some climbing PR's on my usual "review loop" around Bottelary Hills. I put that down to a bit of excitement, as I was loving my time out there on the Stage Max, which could have added a couple of watts to the mix. It also helps that the all-in weight is only 12,25 kg which is very good for a trail 29er sporting a no compromise build and only around 750g heavier than the racier Stage. On less manicured trails, the Stage Max continues to impress. With the pivot placed near the rear axle, the Pyga Stage Max comes as close to a split pivot as it could and in doing so does an excellent job of keeping the rear suspension active under braking through the rough stuff, helping the rear wheel to stay in contact with the trail. The beauty of a bike like this is that as soon as the terrain becomes varying it is happy to play the all-rounder game, easily switching between an able climber and single track slayer. The thoughtful component choice also means that the bike is not let down by any single part and as a complete package, it just gets the job done.Single track manners are very good and the bike will be well suited to most of the trails in South Africa. The Stage Max rides like a live-wire and does not mind quick direction changes and being wrestled around. Thankfully the fork and rear suspension keep up through the rough stuff, adding to the bike's playful nature. The bottom bracket height does give the bike a bit of an "on top" feel, but results in fewer pedal strikes and with the overall balance of the bike as good as it is, I wouldn't want to start tinkering with the geometry. Verdict Pyga made the Stage Max to be a "marathon bike on steroids, for trail riders that want to ride marathons" and I couldn't agree more. It must have been tempting to knock another degree off the head angle and drop the bottom bracket a few more millimetres, but the intention of this bike was never to fight it out on the EWS circuit. The Stage Max takes the speed of the Stage and adds a further dose of fun and trail confidence to the mix. The outcome of which is a 29er trail bike that will comfortably do duty at your local enduro, trail park, or marathon race. Pros A very versatile and lively ride Component specification is spot on As bang up to date as it needs to be Great all rounder Solution to carry two water bottles in the main frame is quite clever Cons Grips were too thin for my liking Routing around the bottom of the bottom bracket is untidy
  8. The Pyga Stage Max is the bigger brother of the Stage marathon/ cross-country bike. With the Stage already adding some spice to the race bike category, we were keen to put the Stage Max to the test to see what it has up its sleeve. Click here to view the article
  9. The Pyga Stage depicted does not reflect the specification of the Best Bike in Africa build. See the specifications below. The Stage is Pyga's take on the XC / marathon bike, designed to be more comfortable and less skittish than other bikes in the category. The Stage achieves this with a longer and slacker geometry than most endurance race bikes, allowing for a shorter stem and wider handelbars, all working to aid stability and technical handling. Pyga designed the Stage around the +FIVE chain line which shifts the rear end of the bike 5 mm towards the drive side. This centres the chainline improving shifting and reducing chain wear as well as evening the dish of the rear wheel making it stronger and stiffer. The Pyga Stage entered into the Best Bike in Africa features a RockShox SID fork and Monarch XX shock, a Pyga carbon wheelset, SRAM X1 drivetrain, and a Kore cockpit. Specifications: FRAME:FULL TORAY CARBON STAGE 95MMFORK:ROCKSHOX SID XX 120mmREAR SHOCK:ROCKSHOX MONARCH XXHEADSET:CANECREEK 40BOTTOM BRACKET:SRAM BB92 PRESSFITCRANKSET:SRAM X1STEM:KORE AEROXSEATPOST:KORE AEROXHANDLEBAR:KORE AEROXREAR DERAILLEUR:SRAM X1SHIFTERS:SRAM X1BRAKES:AVID XOSADDLE:KORE FASERWHEELSET:PYGA CARBON MARATHON29TIRES:MAXXIS IKONRETAIL PRICE:R 75,800.00 Check out the Pyga website here for information on the Stage. If you like this bike and would like the chance to own one, vote for it in the Best Bike in Africa at the Standard Bank Africa Cycle Fair on 23 - 25 October at St Stithians College.
  10. The Pyga Stage on the Best Bike in Africa stand at the Standard Bank Africa Cycle Fair. // Photo credit: ZC Marketing Consulting. The competition is not only about the industry accolades, but also rewards one lucky voter. Those who voted for the winning bike all go into a draw to win it! Into it’s third year now, we fully appreciate the support that the industry and the public continues to give the Standard Bank Africa Cycle Fair. We created the Best Bike in Africa competition to offer another platform where brands can engage with the country’s avid cyclist community. For us as organisers, it’s great to see a local brand like PYGA Industries, who have supported the Fair since it’s inception, be recognised by the public as producing the Best Bike in Africa. Rob Heath - Director, Standard Bank Africa Cycle Fair And the winner is... Julius Cobbett I'm so flipping stoked to have won the Pyga! I would probably never buy a pricey dream bike like this, but now that I have one I'm going to ride it like I stole it. I'm a keen stage racer, having done races like Joberg2C, Sabie Experience and Mankele Three Towers. The Pyga Stage has some features that really appeal to me, such as hydraulic lockouts for front and back suspension, two bottle cages on the frame, and no front derailleur. The finish is also top drawer. Julius Cobbett - Pyga Stage Winner Congratulations to Julius Cobbett, we are excited to fit him on the Stage and unleash him into the wilderness. Development on this bike has been intense and challenging and we really appreciate the public recognising our work again this year, especially against such stiff competition. We can't wait to see customers on Stages hitting trails and races once they begin to arrive in December. Well done and thanks Jules, see you on the trails! Cliff Beckett - Pyga Industries Specifications: FRAME:FULL TORAY CARBON STAGE 95MMFORK:ROCKSHOX SID XX 120mmREAR SHOCK:ROCKSHOX MONARCH XXHEADSET:CANECREEK 40BOTTOM BRACKET:SRAM BB92 PRESSFITCRANKSET:SRAM X1STEM:KORE AEROXSEATPOST:KORE AEROXHANDLEBAR:KORE AEROXREAR DERAILLEUR:SRAM X1SHIFTERS:SRAM X1BRAKES:AVID XOSADDLE:KORE FASERWHEELSET:PYGA CARBON MARATHON29TIRES:MAXXIS IKONRETAIL PRICE:R 75,800.00 For more details about the Standard Bank Africa Cycle Fair visit www.africacyclefair.com or to find out more about the Pyga Stage (or order yours) visit www.pygaindustries.com.
  11. Last week we revealed the results of the 2015 Best Bike in Africa competition held at the Standard Bank Africa Cycle Fair. For the second year running PYGA Industries took top honours with the recently launched Pyga Stage. Click here to view the article
  12. The Pyga Stage on the Best Bike in Africa stand at the Standard Bank Africa Cycle Fair. // Photo credit: ZC Marketing Consulting. Specifications: FRAME:FULL TORAY CARBON STAGE 95MMFORK:ROCKSHOX SID XX 120mmREAR SHOCK:ROCKSHOX MONARCH XXHEADSET:CANECREEK 40BOTTOM BRACKET:SRAM BB92 PRESSFITCRANKSET:SRAM X1STEM:KORE AEROXSEATPOST:KORE AEROXHANDLEBAR:KORE AEROXREAR DERAILLEUR:SRAM X1SHIFTERS:SRAM X1BRAKES:AVID XOSADDLE:KORE FASERWHEELSET:PYGA CARBON MARATHON29TIRES:MAXXIS IKONRETAIL PRICE:R 75,800.00 For a full look at the Pyga Stage, head over to the launch article here. The Yeti SB5c came in second with the Swift Evil Twin completing the podium in third. Yeti SB5c. Swift Evil Twin frameset. To see all 16 bikes that were entered into the Best Bike in Africa competition, click here. The competition entrants that voted for the Pyga Stage will now go into a draw to win the bike. The winner will be announced on Tuesday 3 November 2015.
  13. For the second year running, Pyga Industries have been voted by visitors to the Standard Bank Africa Cycle Fair to have the Best Bike in Africa. Last year it was the OneForty650 Pascoe, this year sees the Stage take the title. Click here to view the article
  14. Says founding partner Pat Morewood: "Longer travel bikes have seen a big change in geometry, driven by the Downhill scene. These changes have trickled down into the enduro and trail market, but marathon and XC bikes have been relatively stagnant in this regard. We felt that the marathon category could really benefit from this new way of thinking" The Stage features a slacker head angle counter acted with a longer reach; so that shorter stems can be fitted. The slacker head angle (compared to the marathon norm of 70-71 degrees) creates a more stable ride, while the longer reach/short stem combo keeps the steering direct and inspires confidence – resulting in a ride with precise steering, without the twitchy feel of many other bikes the marathon category. This updated geometry gives the bike maximum stability at speed, cornering and steep technical descents yet climbs among the best in its class. Pyga will also be offering a longer travel trail bike called the Stage MAX. This versatile bike has longer travel at the rear (126mm) and can accommodate up to a 140mm fork and will be perfect for guys looking for a 29er trail bike with contemporary geometry. Along with their progressive geometry, the Stage and Stage MAX will be the first bikes to debut Plus 5; a correction to chain line issues that have been overlooked by bike designers since the onset of 10 and 11 speed drive trains. This is achieved by shifting the complete rear drive (wheel axle and cassette – NOT the chain ring position) 5mm towards the drive side, which alters the effective chain line from 49mm to 44mm, while maintaining the same chain ring position relative to the centre-line of the frame. Simply put, the chain line on the 11th gear (easiest gear, largest cog) on a Plus 5 frame is equivalent to the chain line on the 9th gear of a regular frame. In essence, Plus 5 offers better shifting performance and reduced wear on the drive train. Interestingly, this is achieved without the need for proprietary parts - all that is required is an adjustment of the wheel dish. This has the added bonus of a stiffer, stronger wheel; as the wheel dish adjusted for Plus 5 has a more even spoke tension between drive side and non drive side spokes. Both bikes offer the ability of carrying 2 water bottles within the main frame, while still maintaining a low stand over height. A removable derailleur mount keeps the lines looking clean when not using dual chain ring crank sets.The Stage already has one big race under its belt – Nico Pfitzenmaier raced it to 2nd place, with 4 stage wins at this year’s 9 day, 934km stage race, the Joberg2C. Pyga will be offering a limited number of bikes for early pre order release, exclusively for customers based in South Africa. These bikes will be available from October this year in size LRG, followed by MED then XL. Pre order frames will be individually numbered in series, and pre order customers will be able to specify their own serial number on a custom alloy badge. Contact a Pyga dealer for more info or contact Pyga directly and they can put you on the list. Each model will have 2 colour options, as well as two build options, as seen below. Stage GeometryBright colour scheme: Blue matte frame // Orange gloss decals Covert colour scheme: White gloss frame // Charcoal matte decals Rear travel: 95mm Onza Canis 2.25 Stage MAX GeometryBright colour scheme: Orange matte frame // Blue gloss decals Covert colour scheme: Charcoal matte frame // White gloss decals Rear travel: 126mm Onza Ibex 2.25 Stage Build SpecificationStage XX RS-1 Build R94 900 *RRP – Price and build spec may change without notice Stage XO1 Sid build R76 500 *RRP – Price and build spec may change without notice Stage MAX Build SpecificationStage MAX XX1 Pike RCT3 R92 500 * RRP – Price and build spec may change without notice Stage MAX XO1 Pike RC R79 950 * RRP – Price and build spec may change without notice info@pygaindustries.com | www.pygaindustries.com | www.facebook.com/pygabikes
  15. In late April PYGA INDUSTRIES announced the launch of their first carbon fibre, full suspension marathon bike at the opening of their new Cape Town offices. Dubbed the Stage, the 29" bike is designed as an out and out race machine, with Pyga’s signature twist on geometry. Click here to view the article
  16. The Pyga Stage MX is the company’s entry into the world of full carbon 29er cross-country / marathon bikes. The Stage MX, though, challenges conventional frame design and cross-country / marathon oriented geometry. Starting with a clean slate they haven't gone for any new crazy suspension designs. Instead sticking to their tried and tested platform with some slight kinematic changes to better suit race performance. What they have done is focus on the fundamentals of frame design. The result? Some seemingly subtle, yet potentially revolutionary tweaks. Click here to view the article
  17. Meet the Pyga Stage MX, a full carbon dual suspension 29er marathon bike. Slack ‘n Long (or Low)The Stage MX (Marathon Cross Country) will be Pyga’s first bike to feature the new SNL (slack ‘n low or slack ‘n long, depending on whether you’re speaking to Pat or Mark). This means a slackish head angle (68.5° on a 120mm fork and 69.5° on a 100m fork), longer reach and a shorter stem, to make it feel more like a trail bike on technical terrain. Pyga reassure us that the bike still maintains the overall efficiency and power transfer needed for a marathon bike. Pyga liken many top marathon bikes ridden by everyday riders to F1 cars: designed for top professionals and can be more than a handful to pilot, when a Lamborghini would be better suited for most people. The Stage MX is said to be stable in corners, grounded at high speed, yet still nimble and light in steering. “Plus Five” rear end offset to improve chain angle on 1x11The biggest deviation from conventional design is what Pyga are calling Plus Five. A re-engineering of the rear end to correct what they believe is a huge flaw in bikes, the chainline offset. What they have done is offset the whole rear end of the Stage MX by 5mm on the drive side and in doing so reducing the chainline offset from 49mm to 44mm. Why the change? Patrick Morewood explained that when the 49mm chainline offset was introduced mountain bikes were using 8 speed cassettes. The measurements then meant that the chainline was centred but as 9, 10 and 11 speed cassettes were introduced the centre chainline has shifted. The result on an 11 speed drivetrain with a 49mm offset is that the centre chainline is out by 2 gears. See how the chain is perfectly aligned with the front chainring when in the centre - 6th gear. Photo: Patrick Morewood Video showing the the chain line across all the gears on a pre-production Stage MX. Video: Patrick Morewood What are the advantages of the Plus Five chainline offset?Better shifting: The centred chainline and less harsh chain angles improve shifting. Poor shifting is often blamed on the drive train manufacturers, when Pyga feel that as frame designers and engineers they should take responsibility by improving the frame design. Patrick Morewood showing of the smooth shifting. Less component wear: They were also concerned about excessive wear when riding on the 11th gear (the “granny”) on a 1x11 system. When riding the Stage MX in your 11th gear the chainline is equivalent to being in your 9th gear on other bikes sporting a 49mm chainline. This significantly decreases the angle at which the chain engages the front ring in the top gear.Improved rear wheel strength: Plus Five also means that the rear wheel is no longer dished, with spoke length being equal on either side of the wheel leading to improved wheel strength. No need to worry about a new standard, Pyga have emphasised that Plus Five is not a new standard, as all they have changed is their frames. The hubs, axle width and wheels (aside from a change to the dishing) all remain unchanged. Our short road rideIn our brief test ride around the dark streets of Woodstock, shifting did feel improved across the full width of the cassette and the difference in chainline when in 42T was visible. The fit of the large sized frame was good with the short stem and wide bars installed. Specifications, that we have learnt so far:Chain stay length: 440mm Head angle: 69.5° with a 100m fork; 68.5° with a 120mm fork 12x142mm Rear Axle Internal routing including adjustable seatpost routing Mounting for two bottle cages. The bike is approved for forks up to 130mm travel. The Stage MX comes with the luxury of space for two bottle cage mounts. The men responsible for bringing this bike to life, Patrick Morewood, Mark Hopkins, and Cliff Beckett.
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