Jump to content

Tyre bubble....


RodTi
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

 

 

I realise that my rear Larsen Mimo was due to be replaced... but figured I could get a few more km's out of it...

 

This morning, a third of the way into my ride - jumped off to adjust my head-scarf, and spotted what you see below....

 

Didn't want to take any chances being marooned on the mountain in Paarl with the temperature being what it will be today, so with a heavy heart - turned back...

 

Anyone seen anything like this before? Bearing in mind that the central "channel" of the tread is now almost worn flat - but can't imagine how this came about....

 

Thoughts?

 

20100307_034427_100_5314a.jpg

 

20100307_034455_100_5315a.jpg

 

20100307_034514_100_5318a.jpg

 

A bit difficult to demonstrate the height of the bulge - but it was raised to the point that I could actually feel it as I rode home on the tar...

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

looks like two1/2 bubbles. Like an area thinned by wear, of which the largest bubble is near the middle (and thinnest)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

looks like two1/2 bubbles. Like an area thinned by wear' date=' of which the largest bubble is near the middle (and thinnest)[/quote']

 

 

Yup - another small one is coming up closest to the camera in the bottom pic... I get that it's no doubt pressure causing the thinner, weakened area to bulge - but still can't get my head around why it "bulges" like that - what's keeping the surrounding area 'flat'? Question

RodTi2010-03-07 04:03:32

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Big H

As I understand tyre construction you have a fabric woven between two beads most of the time from steel (wire rings) This forms the carcass of the tyre. The rubber is then vulcanised with a heat process to the carcass. I assume your tyre is tubeless and some air got between the fabric and the rubber casing.

 

Read more here .......

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

As I understand tyre construction you have a fabric woven between two beads most of the time from steel (wire rings) This forms the carcass of the tyre. The rubber is then vulcanised with a heat process to the carcass. I assume your tyre is tubeless and some air got between the fabric and the rubber casing.

 

Read more here .......

 

 

 

Thanks BigH - still amazes me how much info Sheldon put out there....

 

Yip - I run tubeless... so the million $$ question is... assuming it's merely an air-pocket - would you still ride it? Smile

Smile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Big H
As I understand tyre construction you have a fabric woven between two beads most of the time from steel (wire rings) This forms the carcass of the tyre. The rubber is then vulcanised with a heat process to the carcass. I assume your tyre is tubeless and some air got between the fabric and the rubber casing.

 

Read more here .......

 




Thanks BigH - still amazes me how much info Sheldon put out there....

Yip - I run tubeless... so the million $$ question is... assuming it's merely an air-pocket - would you still ride it? Smile
Smile

 

No..... but why ask me ..... you made the decision yourself..... you turned around!!!!!!!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it is only an air pocket....punture it at home (use athin , shat object) and put a worm in there...let us know waht happens on the next inflation...

 

Me thinks those tyres are past their sell by date...

 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Big H
If it is only an air pocket....punture it at home (use athin ' date=' shat object) and put a worm in there...let us know waht happens on the next inflation...

 

Me thinks those tyres are past their sell by date...

 
[/quote']

 

An air pocket is a debonded piece of tread that can come loose and leave you stranded in th bush.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ya, I've seen that twice actually. Once it started little bubbles several places all along the centre line. similar to yours, and I think it was due to wear.

 

The other time it happened, was also tyres with alot of wear, but it only happened in one place, a REALLY big bulge and off the centre line... Eventually we figured out that we had transported the bike the bike on a different car, and the tyre was in the line on the exhaust OuchCry Clearly the heat had caused delamination

 

Both times, I wouldnt take the chance and got rid of the tyres.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has been quite a common problem on Maxxis XMarks and to a lesser extent the Larsens. I have experienced it on both. Has been discussed on these pages a couple of times with no real conclusion. Culprits tyhat have been blamed are the use of ammonia based sealants and the rubber compound not being up to scratch.

 

As far as I know, and I would like to know if otherwise, this problem has not resulted in complete tyre failure.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a bubble like this on my Intense tyre (front wheel). Exploded spectacularly. Took me two days to wash all the stans out of my leg hair.

Also saw the same on a Kenda Nevegal. But that one never exploded.

 

The stans website warns againsdt using Intense tyres, so I reckon the ammonia in the stans might cause the delamination of the rubber.

Schwalbe also declares their warranty null and void if used with an ammonia based sealnt (Stans) but this could just be a marketing effort to sell more of their own sealant.

 

I wont ride that tyre, cleaning stans out of your leghair is a bitch.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just one word.......replace it and cycle on happily or do not replace it and then this bubble makes a nest in your hair and you think about it all the time.This is a joy stealer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yip - thanks for all the input - definitely won't be riding the tyre anymore...

 

The joyous thoughts of a blow-out whilst hammering down the Jan Phillips berg-pad has (strangely Wink) been a significant factor in my decision...

 

I reckon that a combination of the tyre being well past its sell-by date, my not insubstantial weight, the 40 degree heat and amonia-based sealants all played a role!

 

Of course - the above is the easy part - the difficult bit is deciding on which tyre to replace it with... But that's for another topic discussion... Big%20smile
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

Settings My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Help Logout