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10spd chain too long


fandacious
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So i put a new 10spd chain on after snapping my previous one - but it seems too long. Its sagging when in small blade.

 

Ok - obvious solution is to stop using small blade, but is this a know issue?

 

Before i take a few links out I want to make sure what I'm doing

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Measure the chain against the predecessor and use the same number of links as the previous chain had.

 

For added cunning, make one of the links of the new chain a removeable link, so that you can take the chain off easily for cleaning.

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Measure the chain against the predecessor and use the same number of links as the previous chain had.

 

For added cunning, make one of the links of the new chain a removeable link, so that you can take the chain off easily for cleaning.

As BikeMonster said, the important bit it to 'Make it the same number of links' - which will not be exactly the same length (the 'variance' will depend on how worn your old chain was) - this also assumes that your old chain was the correct length!

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Yup the video that Mampara posted is the most accurate way of doing it!

Edited by Tankman
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This is what your RD should look like after installation.

Chain in big blade front and small at back

 

post-4352-047667300 1288187681.jpg

Edited by Tankman
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Tankman, while your method is aesthetically pleasing, does it guarantee that the chain will be long enough for the longest run that it needs to accommodate? I.e., the combination of largest sprocket used with the big blade?

 

Of course, a person shouldn't cross-chain, but there is no guarantee that you won't find yourself using the biggest sprocket with the big blade in the heat of the moment.

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Tankman, while your method is aesthetically pleasing, does it guarantee that the chain will be long enough for the longest run that it needs to accommodate? I.e., the combination of largest sprocket used with the big blade?

 

Of course, a person shouldn't cross-chain, but there is no guarantee that you won't find yourself using the biggest sprocket with the big blade in the heat of the moment.

agree, i typically shorten a chain so that when it's in small blade/smallest cog combo the bottom jockey wheel is pulled down just far enough for the chain to clear the deraileur comfortably.

Edited by Bullitt
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Tankman, while your method is aesthetically pleasing, does it guarantee that the chain will be long enough for the longest run that it needs to accommodate? I.e., the combination of largest sprocket used with the big blade?

 

Of course, a person shouldn't cross-chain, but there is no guarantee that you won't find yourself using the biggest sprocket with the big blade in the heat of the moment.

 

That is not really a method to determine the length, more to check that the chain isint to long or short if it is already installed, like it is in Fan's case.

But if you do decide to try it this way, it should be close enough, youll be amazed at how short a chain your RD can handle. 1 or 2 links too short isnt a train smash, 1 or 2 links too long is just a slap here and there.

 

I also use the method Mampara posted - most accurate.

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