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RP23 High Volume Air Sleeve


Chubba
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Anyone running a High Volume sleeve and can give me the pros and cons of this?

Just bought a new shock and it came with a High Volume can.

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I popped two RP23 cannisters on my previous Merida AM frame. They were actually deformed. After the second one, the lbs recommended I go high volume can as I am a heavyweight, which I did. Cost me about R800 bucks including labour at the time.No hassles after that. I suppose more air, more volume, more heavy duty...

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I popped two RP23 cannisters on my previous Merida AM frame. They were actually deformed. After the second one, the lbs recommended I go high volume can as I am a heavyweight, which I did. Cost me about R800 bucks including labour at the time.No hassles after that. I suppose more air, more volume, more heavy duty...

More plush?

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What bike do you have. What length shock is it?

 

Volume generally means response.. Larger volume normally comes with longer travel bikes designed for more extreme riding. Fox explained it in detail for the RP series.. smaller can, better response but air pressure and settings can match large volume but not intended use. You must have a 2.5" length or more shock stroke.. did you get the kashima??

 

Each component has a limit as caad4 has discovered.. Are your riding you Merida hard caad?

Edited by Pain or Shine
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What bike do you have. What length shock is it?

 

Volume generally means response.. Larger volume normally comes with longer travel bikes designed for more extreme riding. Fox explained it in detail for the RP series.. smaller can, better response but air pressure and settings can match large volume but not intended use. You must have a 2.5" length or more shock stroke.. did you get the kashima??

 

Each component has a limit as caad4 has discovered.. Are your riding you Merida hard caad?

 

hmm.. so what about a short travel bikes designed for extreme riding? I'm running a regular RP23 (165mm x 38mm) on my Morewood Ndiza 4X bike. It's only 4" travel, but takes a lot more punishment than, lets say, a 4" XC bike... heck even more than a 5" trail or most AM bikes.

 

So extreme, yes. But short travel (100mm). Would a high volume can benefit that bike or would response be sacrificed? Or wouldn't it really matter cos being a 4X bike I run it quite stiff in the tail (190 Psi for 85kg rider, giving about 10% sag) and I run the rebound pretty slow to avoid the back kicking up when jumping.

Edited by patches
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What bike do you have. What length shock is it?

 

This is going on a Shova. It's a 5" travel - 200mm X 50mm.

Edited by Chubba
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hmm.. so what about a short travel bikes designed for extreme riding? I'm running a regular RP23 (165mm x 38mm) on my Morewood Ndiza 4X bike. It's only 4" travel, but takes a lot more punishment than, lets say, a 4" XC bike... heck even more than a 5" trail or most AM bikes.

 

So extreme, yes. But short travel (100mm). Would a high volume can benefit that bike or would response be sacrificed? Or wouldn't it really matter cos being a 4X bike I run it quite stiff in the tail (190 Psi for 85kg rider, giving about 10% sag) and I run the rebound pretty slow to avoid the back kicking up when jumping.

 

Small can is strong, large volume is not about strength. It is dynamics for a particular length stroke.. the fact that caad4 had his replaced for large volume has me interested whether it was suggested by Fox or was it the lbs that made the choice. I tried a friends RP2 running 200psi, flat landing Paarl's road gap had me laughing the rest of the way down. Do these shocks actually have a 'bottom', or is boost valve THAT good!

 

Made my choice in a replacement for my ageing Swinger (which is brilliant BTW!) so easy. I just had to say "RP23 for that bike".

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This is going on a Shova.

 

RP23 don't have a length that fits that bike's stock setup. The Shova standard length/stroke is 8.75x2.75 and the longest stroke in Fox flavour is 8.5x2.5. Is it a new shock/second hand?

 

RP23 sizes: 5.5 x 1.0, 6.0 x 1.25, 6.5 x 1.5, 7.5 x 2.0, 7.875 x 2.0, 7.875 x 2.25, 8.5 x 2.5

 

BUT, here is an article of modification made with Patricks input in shortening the bikes travel to 6.9". A good adjustment if you are looking for good AM.

 

Link: http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/showthread.php?t=190708

 

Re the can size. If you have 2.5 stroke, you could upgrade the can to large volume. But don't take my word for it, speak to Russell at Fox. 021 691 0110. He is the guru, I am just secondhand info.. :D

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Small can is strong, large volume is not about strength. It is dynamics for a particular length stroke.. the fact that caad4 had his replaced for large volume has me interested whether it was suggested by Fox or was it the lbs that made the choice. I tried a friends RP2 running 200psi, flat landing Paarl's road gap had me laughing the rest of the way down. Do these shocks actually have a 'bottom', or is boost valve THAT good!

 

Made my choice in a replacement for my ageing Swinger (which is brilliant BTW!) so easy. I just had to say "RP23 for that bike".

 

true true! I haven't bottomed my little ndiza out often, and when I have, it's because the pressure was low (around 120psi). Also loving this little shock!

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RP23 don't have a length that fits that bike's stock setup. The Shova standard length/stroke is 8.75x2.75 and the longest stroke in Fox flavour is 8.5x2.5. Is it a new shock/second hand?

 

RP23 sizes: 5.5 x 1.0, 6.0 x 1.25, 6.5 x 1.5, 7.5 x 2.0, 7.875 x 2.0, 7.875 x 2.25, 8.5 x 2.5

 

BUT, here is an article of modification made with Patricks input in shortening the bikes travel to 6.9". A good adjustment if you are looking for good AM.

 

Link: http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/showthread.php?t=190708

 

Re the can size. If you have 2.5 stroke, you could upgrade the can to large volume. But don't take my word for it, speak to Russell at Fox. 021 691 0110. He is the guru, I am just secondhand info.. :D

 

 

It's new - 200mm X 50mm, or 7.875 x 2.0.

Spec of frame.

 

I bought it with a HV can, so just wondering what the differences where. Did not realize there where different sleeve options.

Edited by Chubba
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sorry, missed that part..

 

Ah, Shova ST.. as opposed to the LT frame in the article I posted.

 

According to Fox, there is no HV for that length, but.. you are holding it. :blush:

 

(is it gold in colour by any chance, 2012 kashima coat? They have revised the can sizes for next year. If it is, you will have me dripping with envy, big time!)

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sorry, missed that part..

 

Ah, Shova ST.. as opposed to the LT frame in the article I posted.

 

According to Fox, there is no HV for that length, but.. you are holding it. :blush:

 

(is it gold in colour by any chance, 2012 kashima coat? They have revised the can sizes for next year. If it is, you will have me dripping with envy, big time!)

lol...i wish...it's a 2011 model.

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Small volume shocks and forks suffer from noticeable ramp-up towards the end of the stroke. In other words, the closer towards the end of the stroke you are, the harder the fork/shock becomes.

 

If you have a larger volume air cannister, the effect is dramatically reduced and the feel througout the stoke is more constant.

 

This is very easily demonstrated on your Fox or Reba fork. Let out the positive air and remove the air cap. Now add oil (any oil, you're gonna chuck it out afterwards) into the chamber, filling it halfway.

 

Now pump the shock and set your sag like normal and go for a little ride with some small drop-offs. Just riding along, it feels the same. Doing a drop-off has you breaking your jaw. It kicks back hard.

 

Pour the oil out again and apply what you've learnt to the larger air cannester problem.

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Small volume shocks and forks suffer from noticeable ramp-up towards the end of the stroke. In other words, the closer towards the end of the stroke you are, the harder the fork/shock becomes.

 

If you have a larger volume air cannister, the effect is dramatically reduced and the feel througout the stoke is more constant.

 

This is very easily demonstrated on your Fox or Reba fork. Let out the positive air and remove the air cap. Now add oil (any oil, you're gonna chuck it out afterwards) into the chamber, filling it halfway.

 

Now pump the shock and set your sag like normal and go for a little ride with some small drop-offs. Just riding along, it feels the same. Doing a drop-off has you breaking your jaw. It kicks back hard.

 

Pour the oil out again and apply what you've learnt to the larger air cannester problem.

Thanks for that explanation Johan.

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