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Cannondale Scalpel 29er Pivot system


wings47
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Does somebody know how the pivot system works on the new Cannondale Scalpel 29er (the new, 2012 range)?

 

This is what I read in a review (http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/pro-bike-tim-johnsons-cannondale-scalpel-29-31252/)

".... true single pivot design that offers 100mm of travel, large 15mm through-shaft pivot axles and a one-piece carbon fiber rear end that forgoes any sort of axle pivot"

 

- does this mean it that the (only) pivot is through the rear axle, much like the Gary Fischer/Trek Superfly 29er?

- if so, how effective is this pivot system? is it "always active" (ie, active while braking), like for eg. the VPP systems (Santa Cruz, Giant, etc)?

- and how would it rate in terms of 'ride comfort', 'climbing ability', etc?

- and how would it compare with the 26" Scalpel suspension? would the ride be more comfortable? harsher?

 

thanks for your views!

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From what I can fathom, there is a pivot for the chain stays near the BB, much like other rear suspension systems, and a departure from the system the 26" Scalpel has, that is no pivot but a flexible carbon fibre chain stay, which effectively forms the pivot.

 

The rest of the rear triangle is one-piece, and it seems the seat stays are made to pivot/bend to some degree with the movement of the triangle, eliminating the need for another mechanical pivot that side of the triangle.

 

It's almost a totally different system to the 26" system, besides the idea of some component bending to function as and eliminate mechanical pivots. Not too sure what the specs of the travel are on the 29er, but on the 26" the rear travel is limited and just there for comfort really, but works well enough. I guess the jury is still out on the 29'er system but rest assured Cannondale has done its R&D and field testing to a point where they are going to release a good working product.

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Kosnmonooit is exactly, right.

 

The 29er has gone with a more traditional linkage, but with a large diameter axle to improve stiffness, the "bend"technology will come through in later models, but may result in a longer wheelbase, which would change the handling of the bike. The system is similar to the Jekyll(pivots), which they released this year.

 

The bike still runs some SAVE technology in the seat stays, assist is the parallelogram effect. To keep the approx 100mm of travel, front and rear.

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I don't consider that to be single pivot. Look at Morewood, Santacruz Superlight or even the earlier Raleighs. It should have 1 set of bearings and no linkages at all.

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Does somebody know how the pivot system works on the new Cannondale Scalpel 29er (the new, 2012 range)?

 

This is what I read in a review (http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/pro-bike-tim-johnsons-cannondale-scalpel-29-31252/)

".... true single pivot design that offers 100mm of travel, large 15mm through-shaft pivot axles and a one-piece carbon fiber rear end that forgoes any sort of axle pivot"

 

- does this mean it that the (only) pivot is through the rear axle, much like the Gary Fischer/Trek Superfly 29er?

- if so, how effective is this pivot system? is it "always active" (ie, active while braking), like for eg. the VPP systems (Santa Cruz, Giant, etc)?

- and how would it rate in terms of 'ride comfort', 'climbing ability', etc?

- and how would it compare with the 26" Scalpel suspension? would the ride be more comfortable? harsher?

 

thanks for your views!

 

Hi Wings47,

 

I would be happy to discuss 29 suspension technology. You are welcome to mail me @ lionel@omnico.co.za

 

Kind regards

Lionel.

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I don't consider that to be single pivot. Look at Morewood, Santacruz Superlight or even the earlier Raleighs. It should have 1 set of bearings and no linkages at all.

 

This is always an interesting debate. Technically, the way we view it, any bike where the rear wheel moves in a "fixed" arc around a specific point is grouped as a single pivot. Kona, Scot, Trek, Merida etc by this reasoning are all essentially "single pivot" designs with linkages driving the rear shock.

 

Not that there is anything wrong with any of the brands mentioned above but many people are in the opinion that their R80k carbon 29" beast is a multi-link, but its actually a single pivot with a nice linkage actuating their rear shock. For the same token many people ride a bike with an acronym in the name of its suspension design and think its wheel path in in the shape of an "S"... Marketing is a lovely animal!

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