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Replacement


AlexJ007
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When should you replace your chain, cassette and chain rings?

 

Took my bike in for a minor service and the bike shop said that my chain, cassette and chain rings needs replacing... It doesn't jump or do anything it shouldn't, actually it is in perfect condition...

 

 

 

So I recon only replace when it gives trouble?????

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My lbs has a gauge that says how worn the chain is and if you replace it at the right time it saves damaging the chain rings and cassette.

 

Mine was 75% worn on 5,000kms, according to them, so I changed it.

 

It sounds like you suspect your lbs is taking advantage.

 

Like when Cajees sold me a pedal spanner nearly 3 years ago and I used it for the first time yesterday.

 

 
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Best advise....get a chainware indicator and check your chain with it once a month at least. You normally just need to replace your chain.........not everything and this depends on your riding style. Good measure is round about the 3000km mark.....although some ppl get more milage out

 

If your chain is not replaced in time it ware's out you cassette and chain rings......and becomes a pricey excersize.

 

Hope it helps.......chainware indicators is not expesive....from R80 to R300 depending on the brand and how they work

 

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Guest Big H

Chain wear indicators are to be used as an indication only. Park make a chain wear indicator that is very simple to use. It is the Park CC-2 tool.

 

It is important to replace a chain when the chain has stretched beyond these linits as damage to your cassette and chainwheel can occur.

 

 
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Yip, if what I typed did not make sense Big H's explanation is what I was after.

 

Rule of thumb is that you should replace your chain if it's 75% or more worn........some guys take if further but then you run the risk of needing to replace your whole drive train i.e. chain, cassette and chain rings

 

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I don't like the indicator tools because they clip around the rolling pins around the actual chain pins and they move. I like Johan Borman's method.

Get yourself a inches ruler. Now measure on the outside of the chain 24 links. the starting point and finishin gpoint must be the same type. For instance, if you measure from the front of the pin, you must end on the fron of another pin. If the rear of a link, you must end at the rear of another link. (see image below (not to scale)) If the chain is 1/16th longer then 12 inches, you must replace the chain. If it's 1/8th longer, you must replace chain and cassette. Replace from chain rings when they are shark fin shape.

 

20070604_041542_chain.gif

 

 
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Guest Big H

Terwyl hulle nog soos BULLS horings lyk is hulle OK ...!!!!!!!Teee heeeee!!!!!

 

The method so aptly demonstrated by Mampara is the correct way. As I said the chain wear indicators are quick indicators only. A chain does not really stretch , it is the wear in the movings parts that appear as stretch. Chain wear indicators cannot measure this. A Imperial steel rule is a the best way to measure. They are difficult to find but as some help 12" is 304,8 mm.
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Guest Big H

Thyolo.... a tool is only of use if you use it. Yes you bought the tool three years ago, but what would have happened if you did not have the tool. You would have been stranded, something like a aeroplane without wheels.... useless .....mmmmmm????????

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