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Reusable Links with Campagnolo Chains


bikemonster
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Hello My Imaginary Friends

 

Is anybody using a reusable link with their Campag 10 speed chain? And if so, which?

 

My bike currently has a Wippmerman Connex link, which is already on its second chain...and using it on a third chain is prolly pushing my luck.

 

What recommendations?

 

Ciao amici!

 

James

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Wipperman Connex makes two snap links. a 6,2mm one and a 6.05mm one.

Bigger one for older Campagnolo 10s chains, marked 'c10' Smaller one

for the newer 2006 10s Campagnolo chains...marked 'R', 'C' or

'V'...Record, Chorus or Veloce. The smaller link 'may' be referred to

as the 'shimano' link, but will work for the Campag chain, since

shimano 10s and Campag 10s chains are now both 5.9mm in width

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It is not a good idea to use a link for more than one chain. The links wear with the chain and after 0.5% wear it will start to each your cassette. Based on the cost of a Wipperman link I can see why you are tempted. Dont.

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James, I have been using Wipperman chain links for about 4 years now.They are great! I once made the mistake of using a Wipperman link for too long... The link came loos under power, the chain slapped around the crankset and hit a chip in the downtube, the bunch rode over and bet about 3 links (must have been some heavies there) and I had to push home, as the bent chain would not drive my bike...

 

So, my 2c worth - Get a new link with at least your 3 chain! Preferably every chain...

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I'm currently using KMC Missing Links on my Campag 10sp chains. Both the Shimano (gold) and Campag (silver) links work fine. I haven't found a convenient local supplier for them, so come replacement time I think I'll look at the YBN links from Kiwi / Planet X.

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Thanks all.

 

The only reason I've re-used the link is that last time I replaced a chain, nobody could provide a suitable link. I'm not in the habit of skimping on spares - you can't run with the wolves and p!ss with the puppies.

 

James

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Is there a reason you don't join the chain with the "permanent" link supplied with your new Campag chain?

It's permanent. Once you join it, the only way to break the chain (for cleaning etc.) is with a chain tool.

It's also inconvenient to use for road-side repairs.

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If you need to repair your chain, you're gonna need a chain tool anyway (unless you get lucky and it's your quick-link that failed ... in which case, you may need a second one). And you shouldn't need to break your chain for cleaning purposes?

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If you need to repair your chain, you're gonna need a chain tool anyway (unless you get lucky and it's your quick-link that failed ... in which case, you may need a second one). And you shouldn't need to break your chain for cleaning purposes?

 

1. I bought a second link (KMC - thanks Edman) so that's one less thing to worry about.

 

2. A removeable link is the only way to go for chain cleaning. Chain off, shake it around in a jar of paraffin. Drain off filthy paraffin to use as braai lighter fluid. Put chain in a jar of clean paraffin, shake vigorously, remove, dry and reapply to bike.

 

3. Soak a briquette in the foul paraffin to make a braai lighter.

 

4. Keep slightly dirty paraffin for use in step 2 next time around.

 

5. As a side-benefit, the removeable link is a good marker for where to start/finish lubing the chain.

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I use paraffin in a chain cleaner (which routes the chain round a few rotating brushes) ... without removing the chain. The work takes less than 10 minutes (including relubing) ... not counting the half-hour I leave things standing, between cleaning and lubing. I get over 20000km per chain (and don't need to replace the cluster), which indicates the cleaning process is satisfactory.

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I use paraffin in a chain cleaner (which routes the chain round a few rotating brushes) ... without removing the chain. The work takes less than 10 minutes (including relubing) ... not counting the half-hour I leave things standing, between cleaning and lubing. I get over 20000km per chain (and don't need to replace the cluster), which indicates the cleaning process is satisfactory.

 

Environmentally, that is a disaster. I'm sure you are going to reply that you catch all the spilled paraffin in a special bath and that you personally take it to the recycling place etc etc.

 

However, the problem with paraffin as a cleaning agent is its disposal. I recon most of it gets buried or poured down the drain. That's why I advocate soapy degreaser.

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Oh, and I just focussed on all those zeros after the 2.

 

I doubt it.

 

You doubt wrong Johan ... my Polar settings are tuned pretty accurately (to within a few hundred meters over a measured race distance - eg. Argus). Previous chain gave me twenty four thousand, four hundred and twenty three trouble-free kilometers. That included Mt. Ventoux, Col du Galibier and Alpe d'Huez, as well as the training to ride those mountains (conventional crank and 12-25 cluster). So there's been some drag on that chain!

 

And it takes no extra effort to pour the remaining paraffin from chain-cleaner into a plastic bottle (I use empty pool-acid container) and drop off at your local Engen, once full. I also use Prepsol occasionally ... but mostly when doing events away from home.

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You doubt wrong Johan ... my Polar settings are tuned pretty accurately (to within a few hundred meters over a measured race distance - eg. Argus). Previous chain gave me twenty four thousand, four hundred and twenty three trouble-free kilometers. That included Mt. Ventoux, Col du Galibier and Alpe d'Huez, as well as the training to ride those mountains (conventional crank and 12-25 cluster). So there's been some drag on that chain!

 

And it takes no extra effort to pour the remaining paraffin from chain-cleaner into a plastic bottle (I use empty pool-acid container) and drop off at your local Engen, once full. I also use Prepsol occasionally ... but mostly when doing events away from home.

 

I'm afraid the names of the mountains you ride has very little effect on chain life. That is irrelevant. It is a function of chain hygiene, gear size (smaller gears are harder on chains) and ultimately, mileage.

 

Lets clarify something. You say you get 20k kms on one chain and then don't have to change the cassette? Change the cassette in-between or change the cassette when you fit a new chain?

 

We've had this debate before and one very meticulous Hubber sent me a spreadsheet with his log of mileage and chain cassette replacement and IIRC it was 12k or 15 kms with one chain and cassette. However, that cassette wasn't reusable with a new chain.

 

A scenario of riding 20 000 kms on one chain and cassette and then still find the cassette usable with a new chain is unimagineable.

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