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camerons
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I am currently a very mediocre triathlete but as it turns out I am actually quite a decent (relative term) cyclist.

 

I'm having one final assult at a sub 11 IM next year and then I think I am going to hang up my triathlon boots and concentrate on cycling.

 

My question is to those at the pointy end of road races... what sort of training are you guys doing? I would love to see a sample of your training plans and to learn what you're up to.

 

As part of my tri training I typically do one long 3+ hours ride a week and 2 or 3 shorter, 1-2 hour rides either on the road or on my turbo. Obviously I'm going to need to up that as the running and cycling falls away, but by how much? What sort of sesssion are required? Will I still need long rides when the longest races aren't usually much more than 100km? etc. etc.

 

Lots to learn for me in this regard.

 

Cheers

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I am currently a very mediocre triathlete but as it turns out I am actually quite a decent (relative term) cyclist.

 

I'm having one final assult at a sub 11 IM next year and then I think I am going to hang up my triathlon boots and concentrate on cycling.

 

My question is to those at the pointy end of road races... what sort of training are you guys doing? I would love to see a sample of your training plans and to learn what you're up to.

 

As part of my tri training I typically do one long 3+ hours ride a week and 2 or 3 shorter, 1-2 hour rides either on the road or on my turbo. Obviously I'm going to need to up that as the running and cycling falls away, but by how much? What sort of sesssion are required? Will I still need long rides when the longest races aren't usually much more than 100km? etc. etc.

 

Lots to learn for me in this regard.

 

Cheers

 

Any training programme, especially something with a serious goal like yours, should be customised according to your 1)current level of conditioning 2)aimed at achieving your defined goals and 3)the amount of time you can spend improving your level of conditioning - that is what we call 3rd space planning. It is therefore imperative to do a biometric and cardio assessment to establish a starting point and to build your programme around that rather than "copy-and-paste" from other programmes.

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@Enticement - I agree with your sentiments with respect to a programme being customised toward me and my goals. My intention is not to copy and paste from other peoples programmes. I am just trying to get some understanding of what is involved in training to be a decent road cyclist. I have a "resonable" understanding of training and training concepts/principals having participated in triathlon for a few years now. I just need to start shifting my mind towards cycling specific training as it is not something I have looked at in any detail before. Any good books you could recommend to this end or anything like that would be great.

 

Thanks!

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Any good books you could recommend to this end or anything like that would be great.

Have a look at 'The Cyclist's Training Bible' by Joe Friel.

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I am currently a very mediocre triathlete but as it turns out I am actually quite a decent (relative term) cyclist.

 

I'm having one final assult at a sub 11 IM next year and then I think I am going to hang up my triathlon boots and concentrate on cycling.

 

My question is to those at the pointy end of road races... what sort of training are you guys doing? I would love to see a sample of your training plans and to learn what you're up to.

 

As part of my tri training I typically do one long 3+ hours ride a week and 2 or 3 shorter, 1-2 hour rides either on the road or on my turbo. Obviously I'm going to need to up that as the running and cycling falls away, but by how much? What sort of sesssion are required? Will I still need long rides when the longest races aren't usually much more than 100km? etc. etc.

 

Lots to learn for me in this regard.

 

Cheers

 

 

You still need to do at least one long ride of plus minus 100km per week. For the rest you can do Graeme Cronje's spinning classes of 45min each. Quality rather than quantity. Graeme's spinning classes will help you with intensity - hill climbs, cardio, sprints etc. It's all combined into his classes. Just follow his instructions. You will still see an improvement by doing a minimum of three classes a week. For major improvement - do five or six. You can push them to an hour as well.

My average speed went from 28 to 35 in two and a half months.

If you can't attend his classes in Pretoria follow this link: www.indoorcycle.org

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You still need to do at least one long ride of plus minus 100km per week. For the rest you can do Graeme Cronje's spinning classes of 45min each. Quality rather than quantity. Graeme's spinning classes will help you with intensity - hill climbs, cardio, sprints etc. It's all combined into his classes. Just follow his instructions. You will still see an improvement by doing a minimum of three classes a week. For major improvement - do five or six. You can push them to an hour as well.

My average speed went from 28 to 35 in two and a half months.

If you can't attend his classes in Pretoria follow this link: www.indoorcycle.org

 

Your speed went up 7km/h in a road race or tri?What distance was that over?

Edited by gummibear
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Your speed went up 7km/h in a road race or tri?What distance was that over?

With the 94.7 my average was 28km/h. With the Fast One (106km) it was 35km/h. Yes - the Fast One is a flat race, but the spinning closed early in December and I didn’t train much that particular holiday…

Last year with the 94.7 I finished 5minutes after the elite ladies winning time. I ride on my own on the road so I don't go very fast. I get my results from Graeme's spinning classes.

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And 94.7 2010?

 

You said

"With the 94.7 my average was 28km/h. With the Fast One (106km) it was 35km/h. Yes - the Fast One is a flat race, but the spinning closed early in December and I didn’t train much that particular holiday…

Last year with the 94.7 I finished 5minutes after the elite ladies winning time. I ride on my own on the road so I don't go very fast. I get my results from Graeme's spinning classes".

 

I fail to see the relevence of the Fast one in your attempt to prove that quality training will improve your time.

 

2010? The elite ladies must have taken it easy if the avg was only 28 kmh.

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You said

"With the 94.7 my average was 28km/h. With the Fast One (106km) it was 35km/h. Yes - the Fast One is a flat race, but the spinning closed early in December and I didn’t train much that particular holiday…

Last year with the 94.7 I finished 5minutes after the elite ladies winning time. I ride on my own on the road so I don't go very fast. I get my results from Graeme's spinning classes".

 

I fail to see the relevence of the Fast one in your attempt to prove that quality training will improve your time.

 

2010? The elite ladies must have taken it easy if the avg was only 28 kmh.

 

28kmh was before I started with my quality training.

 

2010 my average for 94.7 was 35kmh.

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Aah so! [insert Japenese accent]

What you meant to say was:

 

 

My 2009 94.7 average was 28km/h.

SNIP

In 2010 with the 94.7 I finished 5 minutes after the elite ladies winning time. I ride on my own on the road so I don't go very fast. I get my results from Graeme's spinning classes.

 

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You still need to do at least one long ride of plus minus 100km per week. For the rest you can do Graeme Cronje's spinning classes of 45min each. Quality rather than quantity. Graeme's spinning classes will help you with intensity - hill climbs, cardio, sprints etc. It's all combined into his classes. Just follow his instructions. You will still see an improvement by doing a minimum of three classes a week. For major improvement - do five or six. You can push them to an hour as well.

My average speed went from 28 to 35 in two and a half months.

If you can't attend his classes in Pretoria follow this link: www.indoorcycle.org

 

 

 

Six hard spinning classes plus a long ride on the road sounds like over doing it a bit to me. You need rest days too.

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Six hard spinning classes plus a long ride on the road sounds like over doing it a bit to me. You need rest days too.

I either drop my recovery a bit in one or two of the spinning classes or take one day off per week.

 

Depending on your fitness level you can either drop your recovery with about 5 starting a week before a race and/or take three days off completely before the race. If your goal is to do exceptionally well in a race like 94.7 or Argus - you start slowing down 10days before the race with a steady 60km in between and not a 100km. Works for me...

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Come on is there no one out there that can help?

I'm not on any fancy workout plan. But this is what I do.

I do 30 - 60 min hills once a week. 40-60 km's once. One high cadence workout. Try to attend 2 x 45 min spinning classes. On Sundays we have a groupride of 80-100. And on Fridays I REST.

 

Would also like to hear what the better riders do for training.

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