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Buying Tyres


George Gericke
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I need a new back tyre for my MTB.

 

I know the bike is n 26er but the other measurement 2.0/2.2/2.4 I assume it the thickness. How do I choose that one? Which type can my bicycle take?

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how fast is my car?

 

You see what I'm getting at george?

 

 

Also, it took me 3 seconds to find Choosing a tyre

 

 

Always remember that asking a question in a thread involves other people taking their time to help you. So first do the research and if you still can't find an answer, then give us enough info and ask away.

 

 

(I'm so over working today, hence my answer)

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George your wheel is a standard 26" so yes you have to worry about all the other things. Since you seem to be kinda new I am going to assume your not running tubless.

 

So your deciding factor will be what kind of riding do you do? and how wet or dry is your riding spots. The universal MTB combination down here in the western cape seems to be

 

Back wheel conti race kings 2.1

Front wheel conti mountain kings 2.2 or 2.4

 

Seems JHB likes to put

Maxxis cross marks back and front. Also normally 2.1 at the back 2.2 at the front.

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I am running a Crossmark rear (2.1) and a Larsen front (2.0). Goes Ok in the dust, big consideration for me was cost, both tyres are around R200-250 each and seem to last quite long, had Kenda Nevegals on when my bike was bought but they wore down quickly and were slow going in dry, dusty dirt roads (great in light mud though). With the rear tyre. Your big considerations I think would be its rolling ability as well as how wide a tyre can you get in the seat/chain stays and its mud shedding ability, remember to consider the chain/seatstay clearance with an appropriate build up of mud on the tyre (or not depending on where you live or ride).This obviously was not a huge consideration with the GT Aavalanche frames as the scratches/rubbing marks on my frame will attest!

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Also is it tubeless? do you have tubeless rims? or compatible?

 

If tubes, might be a good time to go tubeless, there are a number of ways of doing that, some dodgy. Tubeless normally means the tyres must be 'UST' although you can get away with normal tyres as many will tell you here, the UST has stronger walls etc. but are a bit more pricey. Check out CWC on line for the best price in SA.

 

I got Conti Raceking on the back and Mountain on the front, both UST, with Stans, good combo no problems at all but then I am hardly pushing them to the limits. The rougher bigger knobs on the front are good for handling but wont last on the rear.

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lol kosmonooit if the guy doesnt even know what size tires he's got you think its a good idea for him to go tubless? Can you imagine someone trying to fix a sidewall tear that doesnt know how to work with a tubless setup.

 

I'd say he should stick to tubes, although it sucks fixing a puncture 20km's from home its a lot easier than to fix and reseat a tubless tire.

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