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My new 2nd-hand MTB!


P.A.K.
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Hi guys,

 

I've recently bought a Scott Reflex F25:

http://www.evanscycles.com/product_image/image/9ba/271/258/31556/product_page/scott-reflex-fx-25-2007-mountain-bike.jpg

 

I bought it from a friend who I know looked properly after it, but rode seriously and had it for a number of years. Obviously it has quite a few scratches and wear.

 

With it I got tubeless tires, a computer, click pedals, bar-ends, and a major service. Paid R6,000 all-in-all. Seems like a fair price to me. What do you guys rate?

 

Specs:

Frame: Reflex Fully Frame Scott LCR shock remote control 110mm travel

Forks: Rock Shox Tora 302 Coil Spring 100 mm travel

Gears: Shimano LX front and Shimano Deore LX rear derailleurs

Shifters: Shimano Deore R-fire plus

Chainset: Shimano FC-M470 with 44x32x22 tooth rings

Brakes: Avid Juicy 3

Wheels: Alex TD-24 Disc rims built on Scott Disc Team front and Shimano FH-M475-L rear hubs

Handlebars: Aricle YC-210-601 Scott Comp 1

Stem: Scott Comp

Saddle: SCT-10 SL Reflex 07

Seatpost: Scott Team

 

What I'm considering replacing/upgrading gradually as I have spare cash:

1. I feel like I'm leaning forward too much, so I think I should get a higher stem?

2. the saddle & seat post (too many scratches)

3. Bar ends

 

What do you guys rate will you upgrade on this bike?

 

I must admit, it is a very heavy bike. Is it the frame?

 

I'll take a pic of the actual bike and post it later on!

Edited by P.A.K.
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Fork first. Get a 120+ mm travel air fork.

Then look at wheels, then cranks depending on budget

 

Send a pic of actual bike. Is the seat not too far forward?

Edited by Nobody
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Fork first. Get a 120+ mm travel air fork.

Then look at wheels, then cranks depending on budget

Something like this? I've been told by other riders to get a 120mm air fork. Most 120mm travel forks are a bit expensive. Will the difference be noticeable?

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in weight, yes. in smoothness and comfort, YES

I am sure you can put a 140 fork on there.

 

EISH that shock is worth more than your bike

lok at rock shox, they have something called U-Turn which makes it adjustable. Should be able to get one cheaper.

Edited by Nobody
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I wouldn't over invest too much. Use it as is and upgrade as and when required.

 

I had the 08 Scott MC40 - big difference over the Reflex was the rear shock (full travel, 60% travel (traction control and lockout). The Reflex only has full travel and lockout. Always found full travel a bit too much for 90% of my riding time. The MC40 had the Rockshox Recon 351 (Coil Spring) think 120mm. Wasn't a bad fork at all, I upgraded to a Fox, but in all honesty didn't really need to.

 

A 120mm fork will raise the front, perhaps leveling the bike out more for you. Playing with the stem (more likely angle or length over angle) and or steerer length (one way to gain more height with spacers provided there is some steerer tube to play with) to try level out will mostlikely have a negative effect on handling (other option is to adjust the handle bars). How far out is the saddle post? Sure the bike isn't too small for you?

 

The TD24 wheels could be a good place to start, the front hub is a Scott hub which is not the best. Mine didn't last long before adding extra resistance to my riding effort.

 

Next replace that which is worn. Again don't over invest.

Edited by Daxiet
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Step 1 - shorter stem. Step 2 - wider bars. Step 3 - better fork. Step 4 - better wheels.

 

All in order of expense and effect. The fork will be the best performance upgrade, but the stem and bar will be the biggest upgrade in terms of "feel" and make you feel FAR more confident.

 

In terms of fork - rather go for a RockShox Reba Dual Air. Far lighter, and you can ask your LBS to change it to a 120mm (they'll just take out a spacer in the fork itself)

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I wouldn't over invest too much. Use it as is and upgrade as and when required.

Yip, come to think of it I reckon its better to not overspend and rather gradually save for a new bike in a year or two if it needs be.

 

A 120mm fork will raise the front, perhaps leveling the bike out more for you. Playing with the stem (more likely angle or length over angle) and or steerer length (one way to gain more height with spacers provided there is some steerer tube to play with) to try level out will mostlikely have a negative effect on handling (other option is to adjust the handle bars).

I should probably not spend money on a new fork while I'm on a budget but rather try to get a stem that is a bit higher to feel more comfortable on the bike in the meanwhile. Will a new stem really influence steering much?

 

How far out is the saddle post? Sure the bike isn't too small for you?
I think the bike is the right size for me. Its a large, and I'm about 1.83m

 

The front hub is a Scott hub which is not the best. Mine didn't last long before adding extra resistance to my riding effort.
How did you know the hub was putting resistance on? Did it just perform better when you replaced it?

 

Step 1 - shorter stem

I'll visit my LBS next week. I'm looking for a stem with a steeper rise. The problem is not that the handles are too forward, but that they are too low. Are there stems available that might fix this?

 

Step 2 - wider bars
I'm doing cross country mostly, nothing too technical. What will the effect be of wider bars? :blush:

 

Step 3 - better fork
I'll have to see how much I must fork out for a new fork :lol: . While I'm sure it will wake a big difference in my riding experience, I'll have to decide whether to spend more cash or save for a complete new bike.

 

In terms of fork - rather go for a RockShox Reba Dual Air. Far lighter, and you can ask your LBS to change it to a 120mm (they'll just take out a spacer in the fork itself)

Is this what you're referring to? Else, do you have a link?

 

I was also wondering, would a 0.4 - 0.5kgs lighter fork that what I've currently got make a noticeable difference?

 

Thanks for all the advice & patience with a newby! :thumbup:

Edited by P.A.K.
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Yip, come to think of it I reckon its better to not overspend and rather gradually save for a new bike in a year or two if it needs be.

 

Absolutely. That is what I've done with my bike, and now all I want is a new crank and she's perfect.

 

I should probably not spend money on a new fork while I'm on a budget but rather try to get a stem that is a bit higher to feel more comfortable on the bike in the meanwhile. Will a new stem really influence steering much?

 

If you think about the dynamics of it all, the shorter stem will actaully accomplish more than a stem the same length as your current one, but with a higher rise. Think in triangles... Your current stem is projecting you 100mm (approx) forward of the headset. This is stretching you out, and laying you more flat. If you just increase the rise of the stem, you're still going to be stretched out, but at a higher position than before. With a shorter stem (40mm or so) you're 6 cm closer to the saddle than you currently are - thus making you less stretched out, more upright, and more comfortable. Far more comfortable than a higher rise stem would make you feel. The other plus with a shorter stem is that you gain more control - your movements are effectively centred more around the headset, and therefore have more of a controlling effect when you turn.

 

In short - Hell yeah, it makes a difference!

 

I think the bike is the right size for me. Its a large, and I'm about 1.83m

 

How did you know the hub was putting resistance on? Did it just perform better when you replaced it?

 

I would imagine in this instance that the hubs were just badly maintained. I've just serviced my bargain basement hubs, and they're back to tip top shape. Your top hubs still need servicing, albeit at longer intervals.

 

I'll visit my LBS next week. I'm looking for a stem with a steeper rise. The problem is not that the handles are too forward, but that they are too low. Are there stems available that might fix this?

 

Shorter stem would fix this properly, as well as gain you better control. Also, see above. Put your hands on the desk in front of you. Now bring your hand back 50mm. See how it raises your body, and makes you feel more relaxed? Same thing on the bike. Now do the same thing, but instead of moving 50mm back, move 20mm up. Not nearly the same effect. You're still leaning too far forward, and your shoulders are still way lower and have less range of movement. This is what it's all about - positioning.

 

PS - ask Pain or Shine what a difference wider bars and a shorter stem have made to his riding...

 

I'm doing cross country mostly, nothing too technical. What will the effect be of wider bars? :blush:

 

More control (wider rotation point) and FAR more confidence on the technical stuff - less twitchy. Also go for a riser bar if you feel you're too low down.

 

I'll have to see how much I must fork out for a new fork :lol: . While I'm sure it will wake a big difference in my riding experience, I'll have to decide whether to spend more cash or save for a complete new bike.

 

Is this what you're referring to? Else, do you have a link?

 

See this link instead - local, and far cheaper. CRC one will have to have VAT added to it before you calculate total cost. EXACTLY the same fork. All this one needs is the spacer to be taken out to make it 120mm (ask your LBS if you're not sure if you're technically savvy enough to do the removal)

 

This is the fork I got. It's come down in price since I bought it, but it's a HELLUVA lot better than the TORA, and a lot lighter as well. I still need to change mine to 120mm though!

 

My link

 

I was also wondering, would a 0.4 - 0.5kgs lighter fork that what I've currently got make a noticeable difference?

 

YES. Noticeably! Mine has made a MARKED difference in my riding. I have hte same wheels as you, and, while heavy, they have stood up to a LOT of punishment whilst still being reasonable in terms of weight. And they'd cost a lot more to upgrade than the fork.

 

Thanks for all the advice & patience with a newby! :thumbup:

Edited by cptmayhem
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So I'll be getting my new stem this week. Can't wait to try it out.

 

A few buddies and I have a race on this weekend, but obviously not going to be competitive. Just for the fun, and to prepare me mentally for the same race next year!

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Actually, examining my bike today I realized that a shorter stem might actually put my handle bars to close to my knees. Which makes me think that my frame possible isn't a large as I thought. A bit disappointing.. It doesn't mention a size anywhere on the frame.

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Actually, examining my bike today I realized that a shorter stem might actually put my handle bars to close to my knees. Which makes me think that my frame possible isn't a large as I thought. A bit disappointing.. It doesn't mention a size anywhere on the frame.

get the geometry specifications, and measure the frame.

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Make sure you pump the rear shock to you weight properly. Seems to blow if you dont. The chart should be on the side of the shock.

 

Had a Scott genius Mc 50 and loved the bike, but it got old and had to move on, but rode really well.

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Measure from the bottom bracket to the end of the seat stay (Where the seatpost starts)you should get about 19"/483mm

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So I did get a much shorter stem, with a bit higher rise and it makes a HUGE difference. I'm much more comfortable on the bike and I can last longer. Thanks for the advice!

 

I did the Tour de Ghaap this weekend (108km over two days) and I must admit, I fell in love with my bike all over again. Sure, its nothing fancy compared to the bikes we see here on The Hub, but it fits my "casual" riding style comfortably :lol:

 

Unfortunately I did notice the rear shock leaking some oil. Took it into the bike shop today and they have to send it away to have it serviced. Hope its nothing too big or expensive!

 

One question though, if I do decide to upgrade to an air fork - how often do they need to be serviced? And is it expensive?

 

All in all I'm very happy with my purchase and new hobby, and look forward to many more kilometers on my humble horse :D

Edited by P.A.K.
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So I did get a much shorter stem, with a bit higher rise and it makes a HUGE difference. I'm much more comfortable on the bike and I can last longer. Thanks for the advice!

 

I did the Tour de Ghaap this weekend (108km over two days) and I must admit, I fell in love with my bike all over again. Sure, its nothing fancy compared to the bikes we see here on The Hub, but it fits my "casual" riding style comfortably :lol:

 

Unfortunately I did notice the rear shock leaking some oil. Took it into the bike shop today and they have to send it away to have it serviced. Hope its nothing too big or expensive!

 

One question though, if I do decide to upgrade to an air fork - how often do they need to be serviced? And is it expensive?

 

All in all I'm very happy with my purchase and new hobby, and look forward to many more kilometers on my humble horse :D

 

Service once a year

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