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Seatposts - Layback or Straight


Caerus
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I'm sure this topic has been debated to death, but just needed some advice please folks :)

 

I am wanting to get a new 27.2mm seatpost for my GT hardtail. I am also wanting to order from CWC today. I was reading in a thread the other day that the two bolt fixing system is the way to go, I will also be going with a alu seatpost.

 

So I have a couple questions, how do I know wheather I must get a straight or laid back seatpost? The post currently on my bike is straight, it came with the bike many moons ago. I've never had a proper bike set-up done before on this bike. I have changed my stem to a shorter one, from a 150mm to a 110mm, for no other reason that I had a better one then what was originally on the bike( Does seem more responsive with the shorter stem)

 

Secondly, as this is mostly my training bike, should I maybe just go carbon? I'm a little weary of a carbon seatpost(Im currently at 89kg - should be down to 80kg soonish :rolleyes: )

 

My choices are also not as great on a 27.2mm post, so need to get this right first time. If anyone has other options besides what CWC have in stock I will also look into it.

 

Many Thanks

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It depends from one manufacturer to the next. A Thomson setback is similar to other manufacturer's straight posts because their clamp sits on top of the post, whereas most other manufacturers have an off-set clamp.

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It depends from one manufacturer to the next. A Thomson setback is similar to other manufacturer's straight posts because their clamp sits on top of the post, whereas most other manufacturers have an off-set clamp.

 

 

So it doesn't really matter then? Now I'm even more confused :unsure:

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It depends from one manufacturer to the next. A Thomson setback is similar to other manufacturer's straight posts because their clamp sits on top of the post, whereas most other manufacturers have an off-set clamp.

 

If you run a line through the centre of a Thomson layback post you will see that the centre of the clamp and the centre of the post is indeed 20mm apart. So it is a proper layback post. IF their layback is the same as other's straight, then why do they make a straight one which is also the same as other's staight.

 

Back to the original question. It's all got to do with setup. The usual "knee cap over the axle of the pedal" scenario. If you do this and you run out of seat rail with in the front or at the back, depends on if you need a layback or not. I like to keep my clamp as close to the centre of the rail. So even if I still have room to move, I still like the get the post that will be able to put the clamp in the middle of the rails.

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I have a Thomson layback seat post on my Trek mtb, makes a huge difference for me. Took a while initially to get the setup right with stem length and seat position but now it's sweet. It's very individually specific. Go get it professionally done.

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If I get anymore laid back I will be horizontal ;) So I should rather get a set-up done to decide what to get. I'm so far looking at these two options,

 

Ritchey WCS Seatpost (Wet Black) 2 bolt or Thomson Elite Seatpost

 

Should I possibly look at other brands as well, any recommendations on what NOT to get and what to look at.

 

I see that this has come into the classifieds today, it also came with this bit of info.

 

Thompson Elite Layback Seatpost 410mm 27.2mm

 

"This is a great seat-post... for us older guys - the theory goes - we should be sitting further back to engage our ass muscles more they are the biggest muscle available for pedaling..."

Edited by Caerus
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What is the question? If you want a longer "top tube" length, get the layback. If the distance is fine, get the straight. Or get a longer stem.

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What is the question? If you want a longer "top tube" length, get the layback. If the distance is fine, get the straight. Or get a longer stem.

 

The question is to go with a layback or straight. Just not sure I'm 100% setup correctly since I changed my stem to a shorter one, I don't feel any pains or have any problems.

 

Does the layback just give you more options on the position of the saddle :rolleyes:

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Hi there Caerus

 

In my opinion, FIRST get your seat position (IE knee over pedal axle) right, no matter what seat post you use, straight or setback...

 

Then, and only then experiment with your stem lengths.

 

Your butt over BB is the one where you cab cause most issues with hands, knees and elbows.

(huh, sounds like an old ad, "hande knee hakke elmboe..."

 

Have a good one

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Hi there Caerus

 

In my opinion, FIRST get your seat position (IE knee over pedal axle) right, no matter what seat post you use, straight or setback...

 

Then, and only then experiment with your stem lengths.

 

Your butt over BB is the one where you cab cause most issues with hands, knees and elbows.

(huh, sounds like an old ad, "hande knee hakke elmboe..."

 

Have a good one

 

100% seat position has absolutely nothing to do with handlebar position. If you start going to 120mm and longer stems, then the frame is too short for you. If you go shorter then 80mm, talking road, XC and not trail or DH, then frame is too long for you.

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100% seat position has absolutely nothing to do with handlebar position. If you start going to 120mm and longer stems, then the frame is too short for you. If you go shorter then 80mm, talking road, XC and not trail or DH, then frame is too long for you.

Agreed. Be very wary of longer stem, affects handling a lot. Only reason to go layback post is to get seat position correct on the correct size frame.

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I don't feel any pains or have any problems.

 

So jou gat juik eintlik maar net om iets anders te probeer!

 

Why change anything then?

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Agreed. Be very wary of longer stem, affects handling a lot. Only reason to go layback post is to get seat position correct on the correct size frame.

 

 

I changed stems only cause the stem that was on there was old & heavy & time for a change. I had a spare one laying about, so tried it out and it makes the bike fell less twitchy.

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