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Training for the "BIG" Stage races (MTB)


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All I have read suggests that a typical training week is:

 


  •  
  • 4-5 sessions per week
  • approx 12-15hrs per week
  • With back to back rides on weekends >4hrs per ride.

 

So the weekend is easy, just ride on Saturday & Sunday = 8-10hours

 

But how do you get the 2-3 rides in during the week?

 

Monday off (maybe 45 min gym upper body)

Tuesday 5am - 6:30am

Wednesday 5am - 6:30am

Thursday 5am - 6:30am

Friday off (maybe 45 min more gym)

 

Then there is also the suggestion of getting in a run once a week.

When? How? count the running time as part of the total training time?

 

Could Spinning work during the week?

 

That's 7 days a week over 12 - 16 weeks.

 

By that stage, haven't you lost interest.

Edited by zaslinger
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Don't know how fit you are now, but I started from an average fitness base. It took about 2 Months to notice a real difference, but once you get there, you don't want to relapse. Boredom does set in from time to time, but once I forced myself out on the bike, I was happy I did it. My goal was to average 15hours/week. Some weeks you can get in about 20 hours and some weeks only 8. I don't own a road bike so all my training was on the Mtb. I am not an early morning person, so my weekday rides happen after 4pm. 60-90 minutes on Table Mountain is easy to do and if the wind is too strong, it's off to the gym and a spinning bike for 90 minutes. That's flipping dull!!

For variety I would take a drive out to Grabouw and spend most of the day out there riding for 6-9 hours at a time, which really stood me in good stead for the times in a race where you think you can't carry on. I hate running, so I never contemplate that as an alternative.

Once you can handle back to back rides of 6 hours with ease, it stays in your legs and you need to work on the dreaded intervals. I hate those , but my excuse is that Table Mountain is all about climbing and I try to improve my own times on the regular loops I do. Or a sprint ride to Hout BAy and back along the coast road with a finish up the Glen.

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Thanks Kandui.

Looks like I should move to CT - JHB is flat and boring, unless you drive out a bit.

Traffic doesn't help either.

 

I hate running too, also have a gimp ankle, it isn't the best for me.

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1. But how do you get the 2-3 rides in during the week?

 

 

2. Then there is also the suggestion of getting in a run once a week.

When? How? count the running time as part of the total training time?

 

 

1. The IDT comes in usefull, better than spinning classes imo because you can use the same bike, gear ratios ect as your normal race set up and can do specific sets that you want to do, not what the instructor wants.

The IDT is also good training for the mind, makes long stages a bit easier.... ;)

 

2. Run in the mornings max twice a week if you want to run.

Another option is to incorporate a few bike hike sections during your weekend rides where you have to walk, push, carry, drag or whatever your bike up and downhill. Good pratice for stage races where this happens a lot if your not near the front of the race.

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Pretty much agree with the schedule,are fortunate can do night rides on the sugar farm,riding fron 18hoo to 20h00 not a problem in our area. Hate running.Night Riding helps with the boredom as well.

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Remember - it's 15 hours at it's peak - you're not doing 15 hours every week for 12-16 weeks. You should only have one or two really big weeks in that period. Recovery weeks are just as important.

 

If you are hating the sight of your bike you're probably training too much.

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Remember - it's 15 hours at it's peak - you're not doing 15 hours every week for 12-16 weeks. You should only have one or two really big weeks in that period. Recovery weeks are just as important.

 

If you are hating the sight of your bike you're probably training too much.

 

OT: Velouria I hear you and (ex)Colonel are doing W2W together according to his tweets? Nutter of note.

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OT: Velouria I hear you and (ex)Colonel are doing W2W together according to his tweets? Nutter of note.

Not quite sure what I am getting myself into.

 

Two rules:

1. The mountain goat has to wait for me on the hills

2. I don't pedal faster when being sworn at ;)

 

All because he didn't want to ride with his wife...

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Not quite sure what I am getting myself into.

 

Two rules:

1. The mountain goat has to wait for me on the hills

2. I don't pedal faster when being sworn at ;)

 

All because he didn't want to ride with his wife...

 

You knowe is going to swear at you regardless if you pedal fast, slow or whatever. I think he was born with a swearing dictionary.

 

Have fun thou, wish I got an entry. :thumbdown:

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15 hrs a week with job, wife , kids and beer drinking mates is very very difficult. And tiring. I think it's all about what you want to get out of it. If you want to finish as fast and strong as you possibly can, or are racing for a specific position (like winning) , then it's what you got to do. However there are lots of ous who ride stage races on much less training than that. They might take a bit longer per day or hurt a bit more, but their 16 weeks before has a bit more balance to it.

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Remember - it's 15 hours at it's peak - you're not doing 15 hours every week for 12-16 weeks. You should only have one or two really big weeks in that period. Recovery weeks are just as important.

 

If you are hating the sight of your bike you're probably training too much.

 

I asked the question earlier about rest weeks... Some useful info here: https://community.bikehub.co.za/topic/108559-rest-weeks-in-training-program

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Something else to think about. A race is not like training. Once the gun goes the adrenalin is pushing you along at a much faster pace than you initially planned with your partner. Sort of a herd mentality sets in. Look at your speed and dial it down a little and ride in your comfort zone. If you ride at your pace for the first couple of days, you will feel that you have energy left in the tank and might be able to crank it up a few notches over the last 2 days. You will be surprised how many guys are hanging on for dear life at this stage and how many places you can move up with very little extra effort.

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Read my topic: Off-the-shelve vs personalized training programs. You do not need to spend all that time on your bike per week if you do it right! One of my athletes achieved podium in the 2011 Epic with 12 hours a week - she said:

 

Pierre’s coaching advice and guidance was instrumental in guiding my performance during the 2011 ABSA Cape Epic mountain bike race. His approach on training time optimisation through quality training sessions worked well and helped me gaining maximum from relatively little time spent on my mountain bike in preparation for this arduous event.

 

Dr Christine Jansen van Rensburg

2nd Mixed Sub Vet Overall

1st Mixed Sub Vet South African Teams

 

There are more testimonials if you want ...

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Thanks to all for your feedback. It's been very useful, to the point that I'm almost ready to commit.

Quite rewarding to get real info and not humour from the regular trolls, although I probably just invited all the trolls on-board with that comment:)

 

I just need to see if my riding partner is up to it.

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