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Tire pressure for higher weight riders?


Justify

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Hi guys

 

After my last 'fun' experience with a gashed tubeless tire, I'd like to find out what the optimum tire pressure for larger weight (+- 100Kg) MTB riders is.

 

Being rather tall (195cm) I pack a heft 100-105Kg's of riding weight. I'd like to research my options on durable and effective tires, but also figure out best practises for tire maintanance.

 

I ride a dual sus MTB, and enjoy taking small jumps and attacking, rather than avoiding rock gardens etc. I am how ever leaning strongly towards going back to tubed tires.

 

Any idea/suggestions?

 

Tx

 

 

 

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I also weigh in at about 100kg on a dual sus with tubeless.

 

2.0 up front and 2.2 at the back?

 

I am trying that for a while after 2 pinch flats and a dinged rim on the rear.
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You should be more concerned with looking after the rimms than the tyres but you are right in asking the question becuase the right tyre setup wil look after both. Stick with the durable higher volume tyres and UST (maxxis is safe bet). Good that you are on a dual susser. My first stab would be 2.2 bar at the back and 2.0 at the front. Work you way up or down from there if you bump the rimms.

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You should be more concerned with looking after the rimms than the tyres but you are right in asking the question becuase the right tyre setup wil look after both. Stick with the durable higher volume tyres and UST (maxxis is safe bet). Good that you are on a dual susser. My first stab would be 2.2 bar at the back and 2.0 at the front. Work you way up or down from there if you bump the rimms.

 

Tx guys.

 

Is there any danger (other than having a hard ride) in rider on the higher inflation side of things?

 

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You should be more concerned with looking after the rimms than the tyres but you are right in asking the question becuase the right tyre setup wil look after both. Stick with the durable higher volume tyres and UST (maxxis is safe bet). Good that you are on a dual susser. My first stab would be 2.2 bar at the back and 2.0 at the front. Work you way up or down from there if you bump the rimms.

 

Tx guys.

 

Is there any danger (other than having a hard ride) in rider on the higher inflation side of things?

other than a bumpy ride and some grip at the front there shouldnt be too much to worry about. Stick within the guides that the tyre manufacturar gives. Above 3bar for all terrain mtb'ing is a bit much in my opinion - maybe someone that ride at 3 bar can comment, i havent.

 

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  Above 3bar for all terrain mtb'ing is a bit much in my opinion - maybe someone that ride at 3 bar can comment' date=' i havent.

[/quote']

 

Pick me, pick me...

 

I often ride above that, and I have a rock hard Ti/Carbon road saddle on it as well... It's a bit uncomfortable sometimes...

 

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Guest Big H

We are quite a heavy Tandem pair. We ride both road and MTB Tandems. We use a 26.2.3 tyres on the MTB Tandem and has had no problems so far. We do not ride very aggressive with the MTB Tandem as bunny hopping with a Tandem is extremely difficult. Our tyre pressures is normally 3.0 bar. On the road Tandem we use 700x28c tyres pumped to the manufacturers spec and we have done many kilometers without any problems.

 

If you are a Clydesdale type rider go bigger but stick to the manufacturers specification.
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  Above 3bar for all terrain mtb'ing is a bit much in my opinion - maybe someone that ride at 3 bar can comment' date=' i havent.

[/quote']

 

Pick me, pick me...

 

I often ride above that, and I have a rock hard Ti/Carbon road saddle on it as well... It's a bit uncomfortable sometimes...

 

Nevermind, I'm pretty much the exact opposite of a "higher weight rider"...Confused

 

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the next oke who starts a thread which implies that I'm fat gets a klap.

 

Should I start a thread that comes right out and says it, no implied nonsenseBig%20smile?

 

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On a tangent.... is it even possible for guys of about 100KGs to do freeriding, or will the tires explode on landing big air? ;)

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yah. staright talk may motivate me to get on a diet. this implied stuff justs wounds my poor self esteem.its all v negative.

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Hi J,

 

When I started my MTB career on a flexy full suss I figured that with my weight I would have to go to very high pressures (3.5 bar front and rear). I've learned the errors of my ways the hard way (by stopping myself very elegantly with my face).

 

I have been riding Kenda's Nevegal 2.1 UST tyres at 2.0 bar in the front and 2.5 bar at the rear (anything less at the rear made things a bit squishy at my 115kg's). The difference is night and day, that horrible feeling that your front end is getting away from you during cornering is gone!

 

Having a stiff frame, fork and wheelbuild and dialling in the right amount of SAG and Rebound also goes a long way of course.

 

I've had no issues with puntures or valves leaking or anything like that, but the Nevegals delaminated with Stan's / Joe's and I have just fitted a Conti Mountain King 2.4 UST (which incidentally is the same size and weight as a 2.1 Nevegal UST) using Specialized's gunk.

 

Chrz,

 

Treb

 

 
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