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Stanchions Lube?


Pretorim

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Guys at Cycles Africa informed us that Manitaou R7 stanchions needs to be lubed before each ride (Thin layer rubbed on with finger) with an oil such as Motorex Semi Bath oil.

Does anyone know if this would apply to other shocks such as Fox?
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I would also think oil is the way to go or a silicon spray. JB what is the best to use???

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Guys at Cycles Africa informed us that Manitaou R7 stanchions needs to be lubed before each ride (Thin layer rubbed on with finger) with an oil such as Motorex Semi Bath oil.

Does anyone know if this would apply to other shocks such as Fox?

 

Seems a bit extreme to me.
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I could only assume your shock will last longer do to less friction if lubed everyride think about your bike chain same thing

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lube on the stantions...

 

Maybe they have an oil starvation problem. Store the bike upside down before the ride to allow the lube oil to drain toward the seal.

 

Then you should be good to go.

 

alternatively, a light mineral oil will do the job.

 

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Does this make sense?

Oil will cause dust to stick, and form a nice grinding paste for the seals in my opinion.

I normally spray my stanchions with Mr Min, at least the dirt does not stick to it.
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lube on the stantions...

 

Maybe they have an oil starvation problem. Store the bike upside down before the ride to allow the lube oil to drain toward the seal.

 

Then you should be good to go.

 

alternatively' date=' a light mineral oil will do the job.

 

[/quote']

 

Really?? Are you being serious? Can I do that? (I'm a newbie to shocks and oiling them Embarrassed )

 

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I find this story difficult to swallow.

 

The wiper seal at the top of the fork - the seal you can see, is designed to wipe dirt and moisture off with each compression of the fork. It is so effective, that only after a many, many hours in dusty conditions, can you start to see the evidence of dust inside the fork, suspended in the oil. I other words, it wipes everything off. 

 

Should you lube the stanchions on the exposed parts, all that will happen is that the wipers, with the first compression, will wipe off all the oil except for the boundary layer (one or two molecules thick and sticks like a nit).

 

With the second compression, the boundary layers is also gone, with all that oil now stuck to the outside of the wiper seal.

 

What's the point?

 

The seals are designed to allow a single molecule layer of oil from the inside (where it is clean) to slide under the seal and so lubricate the stancion on the inside, where it matters, in the decompression stroke. On the compression stroke the contaminated oily layer is wiped off. This happens at the molecular level and only after many, many miles between washing will you see evidence of the "discarded" oil.

 

Do like Lefty says and invert your bike before every ride. At least that way the foam ring under the seal gets soaked and it will lubricate the stanchions from the inside out.

 

The way the seals work on a fork is consumptive. In other words, they're designed to leak a teensy bit so that they can lubricate themselves. You'll often see a well used fork has less remaining oil in its splash bath than a recently serviced on. It does't mean the oil leaked out and the seals are kaput, it means the seals did their work and allowed some oil to escape but no water and dirt to enter.

 

What I find the hardest to swallow is the very specific instruction to use XYZ oil. Seals are completely impervious to any petrolium product and any oil would have worked....had the whole assumption to oil been right in the first place.

 

Lastly, stancions are not polished to a shiny gloss. This is for a a very good reason - on glossy stanchions the seals work too well and wipes off all the lubrication. The slightly rough gold finish you see on there is designed to allow a few molecules of oil to escape with each stroke.

 

Go ride.

 

 
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Thanks JB, we've had a bit of issues with the R7 and will therefor follow their instructions. For my Fox however, its back to "fit it and forget it"

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After I have cleaned my bike with a strong soap solution (Like Kleen Green), I have found that the stanctions are "dry". They also tend to be sticky. (The soap probably removed the thin film of oil on them). Lubing it with oil get them going nice and smooth in no time. Goodbadugly2009-05-24 05:52:29

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After cleaning the bike I will smear some oil around the stanchions and pump the shock a few times.

 

The result is a thin line of grud pushed from the sealer lips. Then just wipe clean this line and your good to go.

 

I?ve done this will all my shocks (2 x manitou, 3 x fox, 1 x R/S & 1 x Marz) - currently I have a R7 and fox.

 

The line of grud seems to be the most notible on the Manitou/R7. The Marz (bomber) very rarely made a noticeable line. The Marz was by far the most problem free shock. The first Monitou had the most problems - no problems so far with the R7 (6 months old - very wet riding)

 

 
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