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Daryl Impey, Christoph Sauzer & David George are all wearing Rockets Compression Garments. Shouldn't you?

 

Stating from R254.

 

To order, simply visit our website and complete the user friendly online order form.

 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to Email me

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Daryl Impey, Christoph Sauzer & David George are all wearing Rockets Compression Garments. Shouldn't you?

 

Stating from R254.

 

To order, simply visit our website and complete the user friendly online order form.

 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to Email me

 

Got mine!

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those buggers need to do some bloody pushups thats what they need:D

 

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Daryl Impey, Christoph Sauzer & David George are all wearing Rockets Compression Garments. Shouldn't you?

 

Stating from R254.

 

To order, simply visit our website and complete the user friendly online order form.

 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to Email me

 

Not for me thanks, waste of money - just get some very tight tights, its all the same.

Cuts your belly in half...

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those buggers need to do some bloody pushups thats what they need:D

 

Ja, ugh! If that's how compressed you get, count me out.

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Not for me thanks, waste of money - just get some very tight tights, its all the same.

Cuts your belly in half...

Scientific Research

 

Scientific studies on the benefits of wearing Compression Garments by Dr. W.J. Kreamer of the Pennsylvania State University and Dr. J.A. Bush of the University of Houston have showed the following:

1. Strength test – 5kg medicine ball throwing

After a 60% weight training session, subjects wearing compression garments achieved on average 14cm better distance when throwing a 5kg medicine ball than subjects not wearing compression garments.

 

2. Comparing different types of recovery therapies – Measuring of Creatine Kinase (CK)

Football players were tested 24 hours post match to determine the best therapy to reduce CK. The following results showed the decrease in concentration percentage of CK by using four different kinds of therapies:

 

Wearing compression garments for 4 hours post match – 29.33% reduction in CK

Performing active recovery activities (also known as flush out sessions) – 25.37% reduction in CK

Hot and cold emersion baths – 23.18% reduction in CK

Active recovery (massage and stretching) – 16.69% reduction in CK

3. Reducing blood lactate

Data was collected from athletes wearing recovery garments over three training sessions. It showed a reduction of 42.5% in blood lactate levels 20 minutes post exercise which included a warm-down.

 

4. Increase exercise time at peak levels:

An additional study by S.M. Lambert and C.M. Chow from the University of Sydney showed that wearing compression garments during work-outs necessitated changes to breathing demand that will increase time at peak performance levels. Time to exhaustion increased by a remarkable 20%. In addition, VO 2 Max saw an average boost of 4.15mL.min.kg, while significant lower lactate levels were detected 15 minutes post exercise.

 

To conclude:

1. Compression Garments increases the oxygen transfer to the working muscles and accelerates the venous return to the heart:

It is widely known that the cardiovascular system can benefit from compression. The increase in blood returning to the heart to receive more oxygen will improve oxygen delivery to the working muscle that will lead to an increase in endurance within the working muscles.

 

2. Compression Garments will create more efficiency within the working muscle by allowing less muscle vibration:

The Compression Garments are specifically designed to ‘wrap' and compress the major muscle groups. This ‘wrapping' and compressing will reduce the muscle vibration that will result in a reduction of soft tissue damage and DOMS (Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness). Due to the reduction in fatigue, the body can perform at the same levels as at the start of an activity, for a longer period of time (relative to that of ‘unwrapped' muscles) while, reducing the risk of injury.

 

3. Compression Garments speed up recovery in damaged muscles:

Compression is known to aid in the recovery of damaged muscle by reducing swelling. The blood flow is improved with compression to such a level that more oxygen and nutrient enriched blood gets to the damaged areas. This will lead to improved muscle efficiency and faster healing

 

4. Compression Garments will assist with temperature control:

Due to the gradient compression and composition of the fabric, Compression Garments will allow your body to stay at maximal performance temperature.

 

5. Compression Garments will improve joint position sense, also known as proprioception:

The message to the brain that controls accuracy movements of the body, are improved due to the sensory feedback from the skin, and in certain ways, from the resistance forces encountered as the fabric is lengthened during limb placement.

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Hmmm.

 

I have a question. Who paid these esteemed gentlemen et al to do this research?

These are independent researchers connected to well known universities and their research on compression have been published in well recognised scientific journals. Kreamer’s research, for instance, has been exploring the topic of compression since the late 80s

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Sciencedaily released information this month regarding a study claiming a less than 2% improvement using compression garments, and the Federation Internationale De Natation (the international swimming body) has banned full body compression suits from being worn in the 2012 Olympics as they don't believe it benefits a swimmer.

 

I don't believe wearing compression clothing will increase my shotput ability, the height I jump or any other physical exercise, but I do believe anything that increases your core body temperature, like any base-layer (including compression clothing), will speed up recovery and prevent injuries. At 5am in the morning I pull of a 45min weight training session without injury, and without (in my opinion) performing a very effective warmup. I do this by simply ensuring that I wear a polar fleece sweater during the entire workout, my body temperature builds up faster, I warm up in half the time and haven't sustained an injury thus far. The problem however comes in after your hot shower, your system is pumped, your body's repairing the muscle you've strained, and now you walk out into the cold morning air, or rain as it were. Two days later you're fighting a cold or just symptoms maybe. This is where a base-layer seems to help, as wearing a polar fleece top to work everyday isn't practical, especially in a suit and tie scenario.

 

I recently tested a summer (cool)baselayer - Canterbury long sleeve top for gym workouts and found it very effective at keeping the heat in during my workout without me breaking into too much of a sweat. I can now remove my polar fleece after a few minutes, making my workout a lot more comfortable. I considered trying the winter baselayer, but I was advised against it by some rugby players, as they advised that if I do wear a winter baselayer, it be the only thing you wear, and you may sweat a lot.

 

This got me onto researching compression clothing, which is made out of similar materials to most base layers, but dependent on make/type, controls heat, sweat/wicking, and comfort to some degree. I've decided I'm going to give the Rocket long sleeve top a try, as I need a skin-tight layer that I can wear under a shirt and tie and something that provides enough heat for recovery (the Canterbury is a bit too cool on the skin at times), but enough breath-ability so that I don't break out into a sweat during work hours. The only way I'll know if it works is if I try it, so I'll pickup one during the week. On the plus side however, the pricing of the Rocket clothing does seem better than most of what is out there, especially for a locally made (proudly South African?) item, which I'm more eager to support. I might be labeled something or other here, but I feel a little irritated when I see clothing that states: 'made in China'. The Canterbury long sleeve top kept me warm during a quick 30km cycle last weekend and I never noticeably felt any sweat the entire time, which makes me think the 'summer' type material is better for cycling and long distance running, also due to the fact that the weather can change quickly during a run/cycle (in Cape Town anyways) so it's dual purpose use makes it very adequate.

 

Of course, this is purely my own experience, and my body fat %, heat generation, etc differs from the next person, so you'll have to make your own call on what type (summer/winter/compression) of base-layer you're going to need, but you will be needing it if you're going to be pushing any limits anytime soon.

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Guest Anon(yMous)

Rockets, I'm afraid that if something goes wrong with a purchase, your after sales support / actual garments will leave a bad taste just like your slanderous / 'warning' post ...

 

So, as I am in the market for some compression garments, I've decided to rather purchase from other manufacturers / providers.

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Rockets, I'm afraid that if something goes wrong with a purchase, your after sales support / actual garments will leave a bad taste just like your slanderous / 'warning' post ...

 

So, as I am in the market for some compression garments, I've decided to rather purchase from other manufacturers / providers.

 

Good for you!!!

 

See, that is the beauty of living in the amazing country of ours... the freedom of choice! But also remember that one also have a freedom of expression and it is my "consumer" right to "warn" other consumers against issues like this.

 

Enjoy your compression garments.

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Sciencedaily released information this month regarding a study claiming a less than 2% improvement using compression garments, and the Federation Internationale De Natation (the international swimming body) has banned full body compression suits from being worn in the 2012 Olympics as they don't believe it benefits a swimmer.

 

I don't believe wearing compression clothing will increase my shotput ability, the height I jump or any other physical exercise, but I do believe anything that increases your core body temperature, like any base-layer (including compression clothing), will speed up recovery and prevent injuries. At 5am in the morning I pull of a 45min weight training session without injury, and without (in my opinion) performing a very effective warmup. I do this by simply ensuring that I wear a polar fleece sweater during the entire workout, my body temperature builds up faster, I warm up in half the time and haven't sustained an injury thus far. The problem however comes in after your hot shower, your system is pumped, your body's repairing the muscle you've strained, and now you walk out into the cold morning air, or rain as it were. Two days later you're fighting a cold or just symptoms maybe. This is where a base-layer seems to help, as wearing a polar fleece top to work everyday isn't practical, especially in a suit and tie scenario.

 

I recently tested a summer (cool)baselayer - Canterbury long sleeve top for gym workouts and found it very effective at keeping the heat in during my workout without me breaking into too much of a sweat. I can now remove my polar fleece after a few minutes, making my workout a lot more comfortable. I considered trying the winter baselayer, but I was advised against it by some rugby players, as they advised that if I do wear a winter baselayer, it be the only thing you wear, and you may sweat a lot.

 

This got me onto researching compression clothing, which is made out of similar materials to most base layers, but dependent on make/type, controls heat, sweat/wicking, and comfort to some degree. I've decided I'm going to give the Rocket long sleeve top a try, as I need a skin-tight layer that I can wear under a shirt and tie and something that provides enough heat for recovery (the Canterbury is a bit too cool on the skin at times), but enough breath-ability so that I don't break out into a sweat during work hours. The only way I'll know if it works is if I try it, so I'll pickup one during the week. On the plus side however, the pricing of the Rocket clothing does seem better than most of what is out there, especially for a locally made (proudly South African?) item, which I'm more eager to support. I might be labeled something or other here, but I feel a little irritated when I see clothing that states: 'made in China'. The Canterbury long sleeve top kept me warm during a quick 30km cycle last weekend and I never noticeably felt any sweat the entire time, which makes me think the 'summer' type material is better for cycling and long distance running, also due to the fact that the weather can change quickly during a run/cycle (in Cape Town anyways) so it's dual purpose use makes it very adequate.

 

Of course, this is purely my own experience, and my body fat %, heat generation, etc differs from the next person, so you'll have to make your own call on what type (summer/winter/compression) of base-layer you're going to need, but you will be needing it if you're going to be pushing any limits anytime soon.

 

Many thanks for the feedback. Our Rockets Compression Garments are manufactured in Cape Town South Africa

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There is a lot of compressionm garments on the market it seems. I bought the compression top from Mr P SPorts, just to serve as a base layer for winter, and it works for me. I HAVE to wear compression socks each day due to some problem with the veins (Thrombosis due to sport injury in younger days) in my lower left leg and were prescribed Mediven Travel. Use it when I work, drive and cycle to generally improve blood circulation. So do you know this "brand" and should rockets be just as good?

 

Thanks

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