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Why did I do so well . . . . . .


Lucky Fish
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This is the story. A long, long time ago . . . Well actually it was not that long ago that I bought my wife a new bike. On delivering the bike to her I could see that she was not impressed and I decided to sell the bike to recover some of the money spent. (The advert is currently running the For Sale section under the heading TOMMASINI VELOCISTA CARBON ROAD BIKE 53 CM).

 

This, however, is not the nub of this story. We planned to race on Sunday (yesterday) at Stonehaven (60 Km). On Saturday afternoon I, on a whim, decided to adjust the saddle height and position and went for a ride. Being the eternal experimenter that I am, I decided that I was going to use this bike in the race. Being only 60km long the worst that could happen was 1½ hours worth of discomfort.

 

I am 1.86m tall and my race and TT bikes are both 59 cm bikes. So in theory the 53 cm bike was way too small for my frame. I was quite surprised to find that even of the first hill the climbing was more comfortable than I am generally used to. I also found the bike very responsive (probably due to the short wheelbase – 90 cm as opposed to the 100 cm on my TT bike.) What was also different was that my leg muscles seemed to feel less stressed.

 

Just to complete the story I managed to beat off two other determined competitors to win! Now, of course, I am in two minds as to whether I want to sell the bike. If this is what it does for me, should I not rather get rid of my Bianci 928?

 

In search of the reason for this phenomena could it be:

1) The placebo effect? (Because there is a change it must be better.)

2) By sheer coincidence I stumbled across a perfect fit for my build?

3) Why were my leg muscles front and back evenly tired as opposed to more fatigue on the front of my legs when racing with my other bikes? (Seat height from bottom bracket to top of saddle as well as ‘knee over pedal’ position was set be the same.)

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In search of the reason for this phenomena could it be:

1) The placebo effect? (Because there is a change it must be better.)

2) By sheer coincidence I stumbled across a perfect fit for my build?

3) Why were my leg muscles front and back evenly tired as opposed to more fatigue on the front of my legs when racing with my other bikes? (Seat height from bottom bracket to top of saddle as well as ‘knee over pedal’ position was set be the same.)

4) I'm trying to find a reason to keep a beautiful Italian masterpiece.

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Not sure if this is correct or not someone (can't remember who) once told me to always ride the smallest frame you can fit on as the smaller the frame the stiffer it will be. Maybe some hubbers could confirm / denounce this theory ?

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Not sure if this is correct or not someone (can't remember who) once told me to always ride the smallest frame you can fit on as the smaller the frame the stiffer it will be. Maybe some hubbers could confirm / denounce this theory ?

 

Come to think of it I remember a couple of years ago seeing riders with what appears to be very small bikes with long saddle stems in Le Tour.

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How long was your stem and seat post.....post a pic of your set up for the race.

 

A 53cm is very very small for someone 1.86cm tall :o

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How long was your stem and seat post.....post a pic of your set up for the race.

 

A 53cm is very very small for someone 1.86cm tall :o

 

Ja nee I'm 1,76 and ride a 54cm. Unless you have a small inseam for your hight ?

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Basically rule of thumb is if you take a straight line from the top of your seat to over your handle bar it should not be more than 9cm height difference.

A lot of the pro cyclists ride with differences up to 14cm, but that is very aggressive

My friend is 1.83m tall and rides a 56 but reckons he has ridden on 54's and it worked for him but it depends on your in seam height

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Ja nee I'm 1,76 and ride a 54cm. Unless you have a small inseam for your hight ?

 

Then he would need a 160mm stem to get his back flat.

 

I have seen guys that tall ride a 56 with a 140mm stem.

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So you had one 60km ride so far with the bike?

 

Maybe you should put in some more miles and maybe do some races first.

 

Bikes ridden in parking lots and bikes ridden during 110km races feel different.

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So you had one 60km ride so far with the bike?

 

Maybe you should put in some more miles and maybe do some races first.

 

Bikes ridden in parking lots and bikes ridden during 110km races feel different.

 

I take your point that a 60 KM RACE is not the same as a 110 km race.

I regret, but I cannot put in some more miles on the the bike as it was sold this afternoon to David Winslow.

I am weeping for the loss . . .

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Don't weep, your marketing tactic worked. He thinks he is going to win on that bike...

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Don't weep, your marketing tactic worked. He thinks he is going to win on that bike...

 

I notice your cynicism. I cannot speak for him. He is of course free to reply to your comment. In fact I would invite a comment from him here as I am not sure whether he saw this post. My opinion is that he only saw the ‘for sale’ advert. Be that as it may be the bike is gone and I can only say that I was happy, even briefly, to own a Tommasini. It is truly a special bike. Every serious cyclist should have the opportunity to own such a special bike once in his / her lifetime.

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Don't take life too seriously Prince. My "cynicism" was a weak attempt at humour. We all have emotional ties to certain bikes that cross our paths, that I can agree with.

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This is the story. A long, long time ago . . . Well actually it was not that long ago that I bought my wife a new bike. On delivering the bike to her I could see that she was not impressed and I decided to sell the bike to recover some of the money spent. (The advert is currently running the For Sale section under the heading TOMMASINI VELOCISTA CARBON ROAD BIKE 53 CM).

 

This, however, is not the nub of this story. We planned to race on Sunday (yesterday) at Stonehaven (60 Km). On Saturday afternoon I, on a whim, decided to adjust the saddle height and position and went for a ride. Being the eternal experimenter that I am, I decided that I was going to use this bike in the race. Being only 60km long the worst that could happen was 1½ hours worth of discomfort.

 

I am 1.86m tall and my race and TT bikes are both 59 cm bikes. So in theory the 53 cm bike was way too small for my frame. I was quite surprised to find that even of the first hill the climbing was more comfortable than I am generally used to. I also found the bike very responsive (probably due to the short wheelbase – 90 cm as opposed to the 100 cm on my TT bike.) What was also different was that my leg muscles seemed to feel less stressed.

 

Just to complete the story I managed to beat off two other determined competitors to win! Now, of course, I am in two minds as to whether I want to sell the bike. If this is what it does for me, should I not rather get rid of my Bianci 928?

 

In search of the reason for this phenomena could it be:

1) The placebo effect? (Because there is a change it must be better.)

2) By sheer coincidence I stumbled across a perfect fit for my build?

3) Why were my leg muscles front and back evenly tired as opposed to more fatigue on the front of my legs when racing with my other bikes? (Seat height from bottom bracket to top of saddle as well as ‘knee over pedal’ position was set be the same.)

 

 

PnT,

 

I am also 1.86cm tall and ride a 58cm. It is possible that it might just have been because it was something differnet (Placebo effect).I agree it might have caused issues later - anyway now that its sold you don`t have that problem anymore.

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