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Grease on crankshaft splines


FSA
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A question for the tech heads out there. Do you grease the splines on a crankshaft before installing the cranks or not, and why? I can't seem to find a conclusive answer to this.

 

http://www.hostelshoppe.com/images/products/la_08fsa_isisbb.jpg

 

http://i36.tinypic.com/24n1rn9.jpg

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Just a little bit. This is just so that the other arm comes off easier when it needs to. Always grease between metal contact points even if it is not moving. It help eliminates creeks.

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Right or wrong, if something is threaded I grease it (lightly). Always have, always will. Makes assembly easy and disassembly even easier. Only possible drawback is that it is necessary to check tightness a bit more often, in case something works loose, but doing regular checks is a good habit to get into anyway.

Edited by Falco
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What about Loctite?

 

on those splines? What for? There's no real need for loctite anywhere on a bicycle.

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SRAM says grease the splines in their instruction booklet.

 

Campagnolo says degrease square-taper spindles and never grease the bolt.

They say apply Loctite 222 thread sealant on the bolt for ultra-torque cranks.

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Why not?

 

Not the end of the world if you do, but adding grease to a square tapered axle increases the possibility of one forcing the arm too far onto the axle.

Edited by quickdraw
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On the Truvativ GXP cranks you have to pack in more grease to reduce play on the non-drive side crank (last time I did it) - but its all in the documentation, which if you don't have hard copy can generally be found on the manufacturers web site.

 

And from what I have ascertained, its not a bad idea to apply a bit of grease to all surfaces that are to be tightened against each other 1) to allow smooth tightening action and 2) to help prevent seizing via corrosion in the long term.

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Thanks for the answers everybody. Where does one get copper slip from?

Presumably the lbs. Builders Whorehouse will have, but they never have stock of the little tubes, only the 500ml jars - which will take me approx. 12 500 years to use up at my consumption rates.

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