Jump to content

How important is female-specific geometry? (MTB)


Zook

Recommended Posts

I have a friend who does a lot of road/tri riding and is about to buy a MTB, for XC riding. Have any ladies here found that moving to a female-specific frame geometry has helped? Does suitability depend on fitness levels, femur-tibia ratio, how often you might ride road bikes with a different geometry, or anything else?

 

Obviously each person is different, but it'd be nice to get some tips so she doesn't make a mistake on her first mountain bike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

w00t.gif for a split second there I read that last word as 'anatomy' !

 

Well, that's important too. Get the right bike but the wrong anatomy, you're screwed. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Generally the bike is just one size smaller than the unisex size for example a normal medium would be roughly a womans large. True womans specific geometry would make sure that the seat tube is longer and the top tube shorter as ladies tend to have longer legs than upper bodies

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I know you get 3 types of ladies specific bikes

 

1. Those that look like some old granny has decoupaged them

http://www.highsnobiety.com/news/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/trek-stages-damien-hirst-bike-1.jpg

 

2. Those that have the low top tube to accomodate skirts (or no footed can-can's when ridden by guys)

http://ladiesbicycles.org/bikepics/Lamborghini%20Urbano%20Ladies%20Comfort%20Bike.jpg

 

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3426/3776854851_168be2cf3b.jpg

 

and 3... what they all said about smaller sizes blah, blah blah...

Edited by patches
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a friend who does a lot of road/tri riding and is about to buy a MTB, for XC riding. Have any ladies here found that moving to a female-specific frame geometry has helped? Does suitability depend on fitness levels, femur-tibia ratio, how often you might ride road bikes with a different geometry, or anything else?

 

Obviously each person is different, but it'd be nice to get some tips so she doesn't make a mistake on her first mountain bike.

My wife is very small in stature and the shorter top tube of female specific bikes made a huge difference for her. Her first mtb was 'n mens geometry XS with a very short stem.

 

She enjoys riding now a lot more as she feels the handling is a lot better.

Edited by philip.maree
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Patches: She's not a flower-bike kind of lass, but it would be amusing to see her destroy grown men up the Sabie Mamba on a girlie chick bike :)

 

Phillip: thanks, useful to know. I guess she'll just have to try a couple out and see how they feel for her. I think her road bike is women-geometry, tri bike isn't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WSD bikes are a lot heavier......would never go for a WSD bike. Just get a normal small or XS frame with shorter stem

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For many cycle brands a female specific bike is nothing more than a male bike, with some or other flower or pink stripe graphic, with parts that are female friendly. Female friendly parts are normally a slightly wider seat, a shorter stem and easier reach levers (to accomodate smaller hands).

 

There are very few bike manufacturers that actually make female specific frames.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I do highly recommned is a female specific saddle from a Specialised store where they measure your sit bones. Since my wife got one she loves cycling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I do highly recommned is a female specific saddle from a Specialised store where they measure your sit bones. Since my wife got one she loves cycling.

 

what sort of a job is that? ...and isn't "sit bones" just a euphamism for bum

I bet that guy loves his job!

 

:lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what sort of a job is that? ...and isn't "sit bones" just a euphamism for bum

I bet that guy loves his job!

 

laugh.png

 

He loves the tool that Specialised name the "Assometer" even more....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For many cycle brands a female specific bike is nothing more than a male bike, with some or other flower or pink stripe graphic, with parts that are female friendly. Female friendly parts are normally a slightly wider seat, a shorter stem and easier reach levers (to accomodate smaller hands).

 

There are very few bike manufacturers that actually make female specific frames.

 

Agreed. I've compared the geometry of different brands and for some the geometry of a medium male bike is exactly the same as a small women spesific.

 

The best way to choose the best bike is to test ride as many different brands and types as possible and see which is most comfortable for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Settings My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Help Logout