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Bike/Frame Advice


racman
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Hi,

I desperately need advice re: new bike/frame. I have started up again after 5years and ride a Colnago MonoTitan (Ti Frame & Carbon Fork), Record 10spd group and hubs with Ambrosio rims. I notice plenty of BB flex in the frame on hills and when pushing hard and have been considering a Carbon Frame/Bike. With a budget of R20-R30k) I need advice on the following:

1) Is it worth switching to CF from Ti?

2) Will I get a substantially better bike for my budget?

3) Any suggestions on frames/bikes?

4)  Should I try and sell my complete bike or just buy a better frame and use the components and then spend the balance on decent wheels? Advice?

5) While I am just getting back into cycling after 5 years(and picking up 30kg!) I have already improved my speed over 80-100k's from 20.5km/hr in Dec 2006 (West Coast Race) to 30km/hr (Wild Fruit Race) and lost 25kg (with HARD work!!!), I know that the bike I have is more than enough for my current ability (since when was that a deciding factor?) but have been swayed a little by all the carbon hype - or is it hype?

 

All suggestions and comments would be most welcome.
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Hi Racman, welcome to the Hub

 

Your 1st post is in quite a dead zone timewise so if you don't get a response and it disappears off the latest posts list, re-float it tomorrow any time from say 8 a.m. and you should score.

 

Sorry not in a position to advise on your query but there's plenty that will be.
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imo the carbon revolution is mostly hype. Carbon is the thing the bike companies have been praying for for a long time. By changing the whole pro peleton over to carbon, the mass of cyclists watching the TDF on TV starts thinking: "Hey, if they're riding carbon, I must get rid of my alu frame." So the bike industry made  $ millions. Look at stems and cranksets for example: The easton EA70 stem (alu) weights almost the same (135g vs 130-135g) as the EC90 stem (carbon) and is much, much cheaper. Why would  anybody buy the EC90? But they sell, because carbon is the bling Cool thing right now.Same thing with cranks - The cannondale aluminium crank is lighter and stiffer than the cannondale carbon crank.

I must confess that I joined the carbon revolution, and bought a 864g Scott CR1. It does not look nealy as pretty as the Eddy Merckx it replaced, being nude carbon finish and I'm not crazy about the big oversize tubing. Did my race results improve because of the bike? No. Unhappy 

If you want a new frame, go for it. It will feel different, it won't make you faster. Imo spend money first on a power meter and good coaching to make you faster. Then look for a good set of wheels - perhaps buy a set of Zipps with a powertap built in. If you have got cash left, get a nice carbon frame for the bling of it Evil%20Smile

Christie2007-03-04 08:42:28
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The Colnago is 2000 model and hasn't been used that much ( see pic below). Currently weighs 9.2kg. I was also considering upgrading seat, seatpost, stem, bars & wheels (for racing only) for lighter components (possibly cranks as well) instead of changing the frame or complete bike. Is the BB flex normal in a Ti frame ( I weigh 90kg now) - seems like a waste of energy or is that also a myth?

20070304_091751_Cycle_004a.jpg
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Thats a reallyl nice bike !

 

Frame tech has moved on a lot in the last 7 years but as Christie says - work on the performance first and then upgrade frame etc later.

 

You should not be flexing the BB that much in a sturdy frame like that - and unless you are a sprinter then it will not be a huge issue.

 

Maybe a new Power meter or set of wheel to motivate you ?

 

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Hi Racman.

 

I would make, one of two choices.

1. If you are happy with your frame, keep it, and upgrade your wheelset and a few other items.

 

2. If you think your frame is flexing a bit too much under your 90kg rather sell the complete bike, and buy a whole new bike.

 

Buying a new bike, is a lot cheaper than buying loose components.

 

Just two quick examples;

Schwinn Peloton ltd - Recommended retail R27,995

Comes with Mavic Ksyrium Es wheelset and Dura Ace groupset, with Ritchey WCS carbon handlebar and seatpost.

 

You would probably spend the same amount on all the components if you had to buy everything as loose items (so basically you get the frame for free..)

 

The same can be said with the new top end Raleigh (though they are apparently having a few issues with the frames). Again, for the price you pay for the complete bike, you could probably buy the groupset (Dura Ace), wheelset (Zipp 404 clinchers) and other components (losts of carbon) for the same price as what you would pay for the complete bike.

 

But, if you don't get a good offer for your existing bike, then you could probably rather just opt for the upgrades.

 

Of course you could always keep both, one for racing and one for sitting on the indoor training....

 

One final remark, do your home work on which components its worth while going for carbon. As Christie rightly mentioned. Make the comparison between weight saving vs. extra cost for carbon components.

 

Carbon does make the ride a lot more comfortable by absorbing more road shock, but certain things the extra benefit is so small, its not always worth it.

 

BUT, if you're like me, and have a insatiable carbon fetish, go ahead and spoil yourself....Wink
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I wouldn't burn cash to get carbon for the sake of it. You already have a decent steed. I would check the set up as the saddle seems a little too forward with the stem seeming a touch long and plenty spacers on the fork. Is this frame the correct sizing for you mate? 

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Thanks, I need to get a decent set-up. The bike is 54cm CTC with a 120mm stem. I am 1.75 tall and the frame was purchased in 2000 from new and set-up by Alan Van Heerden Cycles in those days. I don't know if it was a particular "fad" at the time but this was the set-up then, albeit with the saddle a bit further back and 46cm bars. I have spoken to my LBS (Helderberg Cycles) who have also reccomended a set-up and probably reduce the stem to 110, bars to 44cm and drop a few spacers on the steerer. I am reluctant to do anything now and will probably wait until after Argus. Of course, I also did not want to drop the spacers too much as I was carrying a "driver's airbag" until recently (see first post) and this would have been a VERY uncomfortable angle. 

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Racman, most of us dream of a colnago, and you have one and a Titanium one as well. WOW!! Obviously you need to get the setup sorted out, but that is a minor. Push the saddle back a bit, take out some spacers, and shorten the stem. (you not doing time trials are you?)

 

A new saddle, seat post, pedals, and stem will make a world of diference (and give you an adventure into carbon.) Get the wheels tightened up. Spoke tension after five years will be a bit slack. After that you will have a stiffer feeling bit. Also use the small blade a bit on the climbs (And sit).

 

 

 

If all this does not bankrupt you, and you still want another bike, then buy a carbon, and keep your colnago as a training bike. I garantee you that you will then find an excuse to train often.

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Thanks' date=' I need to get a decent set-up. The bike is 54cm CTC with a 120mm stem. I am 1.75 tall and the frame was purchased in 2000 from new and set-up by Alan Van Heerden Cycles in those days. I don't know if it was a particular "fad" at the time but this was the set-up then, albeit with the saddle a bit further back and 46cm bars. I have spoken to my LBS (Helderberg Cycles) who have also reccomended a set-up and probably reduce the stem to 110, bars to 44cm and drop a few spacers on the steerer. I am reluctant to do anything now and will probably wait until after Argus. Of course, I also did not want to drop the spacers too much as I was carrying a "driver's airbag" until recently (see first post) and this would have been a VERY uncomfortable angle. [/quote']

I agree don't change anything until after your event...!!For 1,75m you must have a gymnasts shoulders and chest for 46cm bars! If not that's the first thing I would look to change. I am 1,84m and ride a 58C-T-C with a stem of 110mm and conciously reduced my bars to 42cm.
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Colnago is one of my favourite frames. Second hand bikes sell for next to nothing nowerdays, I would guess you can get mabe R4000 to R6000 for the bike. So I also suggest keeping it.

 

Some nice Campagnolo wheels, and a matching set if ITM or Cinelli stem, bars and seatpost will look nice.

 

Wheels: for clinchers I like the Campy Neutrons going for about R4000 on totalcycling.com. Also, the rear wheel has 24 spokes, so can be converted to a powertap wheel if you want. Wheels make a noticable difference to the ride of a bike, expecially when accelerating. Some super light wheels have got rider weight limits, make sure of those.

 

Handlebar - go carbon. Extra stifness is noticable when you stand, and extra damping would be most noticable here. Fairly expensive, about R1500 to R2000.

 

stem: Little difference performance wise between carbon and aluminium. I like the ITM milenium 4ever aluminium stem for about R730.

 

seatpost: Same story as with the stems. Carbon offers bling, but not much other advantage over aluminium. Extra bending stiffness would be hard to notice here, and most noticable damping in this area will come from the saddle, so most seatposts will feel the same. Again, I like the ITM milenium aluminium post for about R600.
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Hi.

 

 

 

I am not an expert but I think you must keep the bike and just do a setup and get new wheels. The bike is till cool. I have the same delimma, I still ride a cheap Haro cr1 8sp SORA. My times have improve and I am doing now arround 2:35 for a 100km race (Vodacom Race in Potch).

 

 

 

I am sceptical about getting a new bike but the groupset will help. Hope you come right.https://www.bikehub.co.za/smileys/smiley32.gif

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Thanks for all the good advice everyone. I have decided to follow it and get a decent set-uo, change stem, bars etc.

 

Next question - any suggestions on decent wheels for racing. My buidget will be between R4k-R8k, and must be reliable for a heavier rider (80-90kg)? Also do I go for a Campag Neutron type of rim (normal section) or Zonda/Eurus/Ksyrium (mid aero type section)? Smile
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I'm not a believer in the advantages of mild aero section rims in bunch racing, but I like them because thet look fast. In SA the races are mostly 100km, and a lot of that time is spent drafting. So decide between deep section Zipp 404, Reynolds Stratus, Mavic Cosmic, or any other mid/shallow section wheel you like.

In theory, the more aero the profile of the rim, the higher the radial stiffness of the rim, the harder the ride.

I love Campy parts and wheels and for style reasons you could go all Italian, but Mavic, American classic etc. also make great wheels.
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racman: I'm 97kg's, and have been using a pair of Spinergy Stealth PBO's...it's a nice deep section carbon fibre rim, clincher, and aluminium braking surface. Same wheel Excel team used last year. I haven't been able to even get them out of true, much less break them. Ask the guys on the forum. I'm a big boy, and I'm hard on equipment. Also, they'll fit your budget perfectly...I think suggested retail is R7000 or so...

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Great Bike!! I also have a 54cm Ti frame (in the Mapei colours), I'm the same height as you (1,75m) and after a recent set-up at Arran/cycle-fit I am running a 100mm stem and my saddle is set further back than yours. I?d hold onto the frame and rather get it set-up properly.

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