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Advice on combining running and cycling.


epoh
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I am new to the sport and although I am
fairly fit (mostly from spinning) I lack endurance and strength. I used to run
a bit before I started cycling and I am thinking of continuing with the running
as I believe it is good for building endurance and strength.



I have strong knees and there is no problem as far as that is concerned (Apart
from other things it seems like the main reason for why people do not run).



My question is, would running be beneficial to my cycling? I want to make
cycling my main focus point but would also like to incorporate running as a
form of cross training to build endurance and strength. I will do anything to
speed up the process of increasing my threshold on the bike.



I have heard a lot of people say that the two work against each other but I
cannot see how?



What do you guys think of building a program that includes a good combination
of running and cycling?



PS: Does anyone have a decent gym program aimed at cyclists that they would
like to share?





epoh38778.9357060185
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Recent research into the benefits of cross-training have shown that

while cycling benefits your running, the converse is not true. In fact

athletes who used running as part of their cycling training showed a

decrease in performance which leads one to suggest that it is a bad

idea unless you ultimately want to enter multisport (duathlon,

triathlon) events.

 

 

 

My personal experience is that you can build better aerobic fitness

through cycling than through running as there is far less 'wear and

tear' on the body when riding (hence most peoples concern about their

knee's amongst other things). By the same token it may be easier to do

anerobic (speed and strength) sessions while running as you need less

of a controlled enviroment (anerobic sessions on a bike are difficult

when dodging cars, traffic lights and other nasties) but then the

research mentioned above has suggested that while it will improve your

running it is unlikely to help your cycling.

 

 

 

Unless you are have aspirations of being a 'pro' then I would say carry

on running as a way of getting off the bike without losing fitness and

also because it is a great form of exercise for those that enjoy it.

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Sir??? Running not benefitting cycling??? smileys/smiley5.gif I believe it does, gives you stronger hamstrings, and with stronger hamstrings smileys/smiley4.gifsmileys/smiley4.gifsmileys/smiley4.gif You obviiusly need to stop running before races so your legs can rest, and then the COMPITITION is smileys/smiley11.gif

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Ek dink ekstem saam met Sir Fred. Ons het nou weer begin hokkie speel en baie fiksheid begin doen. Die afgelope 3 training rides kon ek nie byhou op bulte nie (en ek het gewoonlik die ouens saam wie ek oefen weg gery) Ek kon nie verstaan wat aangaan nie....maar nou maak die bietjie sin. Dalk is die hardlopery besig om my fiestry te beinvloed?smileys/smiley19.gif

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I am new to the sport and although I am fairly fit (mostly from spinning) I lack endurance and strength. I used to run a bit before I started cycling and I am thinking of continuing with the running as I believe it is good for building endurance and strength.

 

I have strong knees and there is no problem as far as that is concerned (Apart from other things it seems like the main reason for why people do not run).

 

My question is' date=' would running be beneficial to my cycling? I want to make cycling my main focus point but would also like to incorporate running as a form of cross training to build endurance and strength. I will do anything to speed up the process of increasing my threshold on the bike.

 

I have heard a lot of people say that the two work against each other but I cannot see how?

 

What do you guys think of building a program that includes a good combination of running and cycling?

 

PS: Does anyone have a decent gym program aimed at cyclists that they would like to share?

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I would say that it depends on how seriously you want to take your cycling. If you want to improve your performance on the bike as quickly and efficiently as you can then leave the running. Time for most people is an issue and certainly specific time on the bike is more beneficial in all areas of training than running will be (for cycling)

If however it is convenient to run and you enjoy it then it will certainly help you maintain aerobic fitness. From a strength point of view there is little if any benefit as cycling and running are very different activities and recruit muscles very differently - training is about specificity.

Good luck

 

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PS: Does anyone have a decent gym program aimed at cyclists that they would like to share?

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Stay away from the gym if you are focused on improving your cycling - it has been scientifically proven that gym/strength work has no benefit whatsoever to endurance cyclists (as opposed to short track sprint type cyclists)

Perhaos some core work can be incorporated but the theory that stronger legs = better cyclists is not true. The limiting factor for ALL cyclists is cardiovascular fitness.

To improve threshold you need to focus on getting as much quality work into your training as you can (15min + intervals at 90-105% threshold) - this assuming you have a reasonable fitness as you state. Anything less than hard tempo will not elicit much (if anything) in the way of improvements to threshold.

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Bikemax surely some upper body strenghth excercises in the gym for abs will help? I used to suffer from back and neck strain till i started doing these.

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Bikemax surely some upper body strenghth excercises in the gym for abs will help? I used to suffer from back and neck strain till i started doing these.

Yes - I did say in my post that core work is beneficial and particualrly for those with lower back weakness. My main point was that the leg strength perception that so many have is not correct.

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If you run with proper form you should not get injured.  Most running injuries, especially the knees, are caused by over use or improper form.  I picked up knee problems because of cycling, and not running, but this was my own fault by doing to much to soon.<?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

One thing to remember, it takes longer for your body to recover from a hard run then it takes to recover from a hard cycle.  So if you have the time, then performing correct running workouts will improve your endurance and base fitness.

I started following "Hadd's Approach to Distance Training" and the impact on my joints is far less.  I recently completed the Pirates 21, any one that is involved in running will agree on me that they don?t call it the toughest 21 in <?:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />South Africafor nothing, but by following Hadd's principals, I had a very easy run and no soreness the next day.

I don't believe  you can be a super cyclist and a super runner at the same time, but by doing the one, you definitely assist the other. 

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Running not benefitting cycling??? smileys/smiley5.gif I believe it does' date=' gives you stronger hamstrings, and with stronger hamstrings [/quote']

 

from Tanaka (1994)

It appears that some transfer of training effects on VO2max exist

from one mode to another. Available data generally suggest that training effects

gained in running are more likely to transfer to cycling than vice versa. It was

generally concluded that adaptation following cycling training is more specific

than that following running training, whereas training adaptation of running

training is more general in nature.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sir Fed38779.3870833333

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Running not benefitting cycling??? smileys/smiley5.gif I believe it does' date=' gives you stronger hamstrings' date=' and with stronger hamstrings [/quote'']

from Tanaka (1994)
It appears that some transfer of training effects on VO2max exist from one mode to another. Available data generally suggest that training effects gained in running are more likely to transfer to cycling than vice versa. It was generally concluded that adaptation following cycling training is more specific than that following running training, whereas training adaptation of running training is more general in nature.

 

 

i.e - fitness (cardiovascular) rather than muscular strength benefits.

It is also thought to be attributable to the fact that most runners run for less time and at a higher intensity than most cyclists, and as such achieve greater fitness. There is far more "easy social" cycling than running.

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EPOH - To answer your question: If improving your strength and endurance on the bike as quickly as possible is your goal, then you need to adapt your training on the bike and not take up running.

Rather spend some time looking for a cycling coach/training programme with your goals in mind. Having a specific programme to follow is critical, instead of just going out every day with no plan.

In most sports (cycling included) nothing beats sport specific training i.e. to improve your cycling you need to cycle, and not waste valuable time on other forms of exercise.

Some form of cross training for your core and stabiliser muscles which are not exercised by cycling (but are important for cycling and general well being) would be beneficial in the long run smileys/smiley4.gif (pun intended).

Running in moderation is probably one of the easiest, cheapest and best forms of exercise a person could do, however it is quite demanding on your body and for a beginner (someone who has not run regularly on a consistent basis) it can take 6-8 months for your body to adapt to the rigours of regular running and therefore is not a quick or easy route to improve your cycling.

 

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To be better cyclist you have to cycle. Specicifity is always the key. However, if running is a passion of yours, and will ensure that you are more content in your training - that means you will train more, which will mean greater gains, then run - and love it. If we stop enjoying our training, we may as well stop training. Sometimes the best method of training is not the best method of training smileys/smiley1.gif

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I am plan to run the two oceans and beat my only previous argus time this year. I find on the transition days (from running to cycling or visa versa) more difficult than consecutive days in the same activity. 

I run on Mondays and Tuesdays and cycle Wed, Thurs, Sat and Sunday.

I do not have much of a background in either sport, I just find that running gets me fitter (perception) and leaner more quickly than cycling. I will never be a great cyclist or runner but enjoy both so don't mind if there is a downside. I like to compete in lots of sports rather than just one.

I ran my first marathon a couple of weeks ago (hardest thing I have ever done)and my legs still feel it now, they should be fine in time for the Argus. I have not run since the Argus but will convert entirely to running after it to prepare for the TO, however I will compete in the last two SV league races.

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