Jump to content

HR and power training


Recommended Posts

How does the idea of doing base training fit in with a power training programme?  All of the heart rate based training articles I've read, insist on setting up a good base with lots of LSD rides and keeping ones heart rate between 60 and 70% during this phase; while high intensity training should only be done in the middle to latter parts of the training programme.

I don't know much about training by power and perhaps I am misinformed, but it appears to be all about sustaining maximum power over a set time period, and generally higher intensity training.

For those that train by power, how do your heart rates zones compare to those set out in a typical heart rate based training programme?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You have different power training zone in power too, worked out according to your ftp. gianni2007-06-11 08:51:10

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How does the idea of doing base training fit in with a power training programme?  All of the heart rate based training articles I've read' date=' insist on setting up a good base with lots of LSD rides and keeping ones heart rate between 60 and 70% during this phase; while high intensity training should only be done in the middle to latter parts of the training programme.

I don't know much about training by power and perhaps I am misinformed, but it appears to be all about sustaining maximum power over a set time period, and generally higher intensity training.

For those that train by power, how do your heart rates zones compare to those set out in a typical heart rate based training programme?

[/quote']

 

There is a power level schema that is equivalent to the HR schema.

 

Fundamentally though, modern thinking is moving away for the LSD approach.

 

There are three primary energy systems or pathways that are used to produce power:

Aerobic

Anaerobic

Neuromuscular

The benefit of using a power meter is that it is quite easy to isolate these three energy systems and train them specifically.

So, the traditional "base" phase of training is aimed at building the "aerobic" energy pathway.  This is most effectively achieved by exercising at an intensity that is sub-threshold.

 

Depending on the type of even you are doing, the anaerobic and neuro-muscular systems must be trained in a way required by that event.

 

The LSD approach is flawed for a couple of reasons:

Such low intensity requires massive amounts of volume to achieve the same results (since training stress is volume x intensity).  Since LSD is usually done during winter months, this is actually quite difficult to get right.

The specificity principle means that there is not much benefit in slow 5 hour rides when your target event is a fast 2 - 3 hour ride.bruce2007-06-11 09:03:01
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bruce - A while back you posted a chart stating what benefits at what level of intensity. I cant find it.......will you post it again. I found it very interesting. After that I chucked LSD rides. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

How does the idea of doing base training fit in with a power training programme?  All of the heart rate based training articles I've read' date=' insist on setting up a good base with lots of LSD rides and keeping ones heart rate between 60 and 70% during this phase; while high intensity training should only be done in the middle to latter parts of the training programme.

I don't know much about training by power and perhaps I am misinformed, but it appears to be all about sustaining maximum power over a set time period, and generally higher intensity training.

For those that train by power, how do your heart rates zones compare to those set out in a typical heart rate based training programme?

[/quote']

 

Using power to train with is simply using an accurate measuring device - it does not dictate how you train but only what your output is.

 

So if you wanted to do a protracted period of slow base training then a PM would tell you what power you were riding at - as you got fitter and were able to sustain a higher power for a longer period, the PM would show you that and allow you to adjust zones accordingly (in order to keep progressing)

 

Please don't confuse training with power and training at a high intensity - they are two entirely different things.

 

As Bruce says, nowadays, training at a higher intensity is considered a better way to spend time on the bike - after all, even for a long race like the Epic, the higher power output you can sustain for a longer period will lead to a faster race time.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Bruce and Bikemax

 

It's odd that many people still preach the LSD training principle.  I attended a POLAR training workshop a month or two ago, and I got the impression I would crash and burn - hard - if I didn't follow it.

 

Is this change in training philosophy only witnessed in cycling, or is it across all endurance sportds?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Thanks Bruce and Bikemax

 

It's odd that many people still preach the LSD training principle.  I attended a POLAR training workshop a month or two ago' date=' and I got the impression I would crash and burn - hard - if I didn't follow it.

 

Is this change in training philosophy only witnessed in cycling, or is it across all endurance sportds?
[/quote']

 

Don't get me wrong - a decent level of all round fitness is key before attempting high intensity training - but in general the low intensity slow riding is being phased out in favour of more productive training.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Bruce and Bikemax

 

It's odd that many people still preach the LSD training principle.  I attended a POLAR training workshop a month or two ago' date=' and I got the impression I would crash and burn - hard - if I didn't follow it.

 

Is this change in training philosophy only witnessed in cycling, or is it across all endurance sportds?
[/quote']

The approach we are talking about is commonly termed "reverse periodisation".  Do a google search for "reverse periodisation" and you'll see a lot of info in all endurance sports - running, swimming, cycling etc.

 

 

 

Take a look at Ric Sterns response to the question:

 

The principle of this approach is to raise your aerobic power as high as possible, then do specific work for your event.  Fundamentally in every cycling discipline the higher your aerobic power output, the better you can perform
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bruce - A while back you posted a chart stating what benefits at what level of intensity. I cant find it.......will you post it again. I found it very interesting. After that I chucked LSD rides. 

 

 

Just wondering if he doesn't mean the physiological benefits in different levels ..? 

 

Yes, I think you are right (reading the post again)

 

Here is the chart as a picture:

 

20070611_130943_table1.JPG
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Following the links from the previous hubbers' date=' I came across the following link in one of the articles

 

 

Not sure how true it is, but certainly helps those of us without power meters Tongue
[/quote']

 

Numbers look about right for what I have experienced on the track.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

My Profile My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Settings Help Logout