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Daily Protein intake: 2gr/KG


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As the road season is coming round, its time to get back into shape. Currently 7kgs over my ideal weight of the bad stuff.

 

I need to cut down on the bad stuff to lose weight and at same time and start building on the muscles again.

 

Anyone work on the the rule of 2gr/KG body weight as a supplemented diet? I have 6 meals a day of which 3 are Protein shakes.

 

Thats hard and expensive to achieve. 87 X 2 = 175Gr of protein /day

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I recall reading that the recommended protein intake for an endurance athlete is around 1-1.5g/kg lean body weight.

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I recall reading that the recommended protein intake for an endurance athlete is around 1-1.5g/kg lean body weight.

 

You are right. I have it actually written down as 1 - 1.2 g/kg body mass, that's for strength training (muscle building)

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You are right. I have it actually written down as 1 - 1.2 g/kg body mass, that's for strength training (muscle building)

For strenght training / muscle building they recommend 1 - 1.2grams per Pound of body weight. So its about 2.2 - 2.4 grams/kg.

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For strenght training / muscle building they recommend 1 - 1.2grams per Pound of body weight. So its about 2.2 - 2.4 grams/kg.

Who is they? Most of the sport science sources I've read say that anything above 2g/kg body weight is unnecessary.

 

Here's a pretty good write-up of protein in sports by the Australian Institute of Sport. Their recommendations range from 0.8-1g/kg for a sedentary person to 1.6g/kg for an elite endurance athlete and max out at 1.7g/kg for a resistance athlete. The claim few benefits from going above 2g/kg bodyweight.

http://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition/factsheets/basics/protein_-_how_much

 

This article from the US National Strength and Conditioning Association recommends 1.5-2g/kg of bodweight, with the upper level applying to elite strength athletes.

http://www.nsca-lift.org/HotTopic/download/Protein%20Needs.pdf

 

This roundtable discussion with three sports nutritionists gives some useful information about protein intake and the need for supplementation:

http://www.gssiweb.com/Article_Detail.aspx?articleid=258

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Who is they? Most of the sport science sources I've read say that anything above 2g/kg body weight is unnecessary.

 

:thumbup:

:lol: It seems a lot of people just piss a lot of expensive pee

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Everyone has a different view.

 

Often heard the following:

 

Bodybuilding Mass gain: 2kg/kg body weight.

Endurance: 1kg-1.5kg (but this depends on what extreme conditions your body faces - can be up to 2kg)

Weight loss: 1kg (and of course other diet related changes, but in terms of protein content.

 

I dont think you can generalize though. One endurance athlete could be someone who does Extreme MTB once a week, others can be a cyclist that does 50 to 100km 3 to 4 times a week. And also to think of the other NB nutrients your body needs in addition to protein. Dont get me wrong its critical, but take the whole equation into account.

 

Best is to get to know your body, and if in doubt consult a dietician / nutrition expert for some assistance.

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As the road season is coming round, its time to get back into shape. Currently 7kgs over my ideal weight of the bad stuff.

 

I need to cut down on the bad stuff to lose weight and at same time and start building on the muscles again.

 

 

 

 

Simple. Train a bit more, eat a bit less, and follow basic nutrition, as in a healthy, balanced diet.

 

Don't over think these things too much. Life's too short to weigh your food, and analyse every mouthful. Rather get enjoyment from the sport.

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Here is an article thats say up to 2g per kg is perfectly safe, and may improve the training adaptations to exercise training. http://www.jissn.com/content/4/1/8

 

Another one saying 2 - 2.5kg would be the upper limt: http://journals.humankinetics.com/ijsnem-back-issues/IJSNEMVolume16Issue2April/AReviewofIssuesofDietaryProteinIntakeinHumans

 

I was just saying that that it what can be taken. My view is that 1.5g is more like reasonable amount to eat daily when training hard. Just follow a good balance diet and you will be fine.

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Here is an article thats say up to 2g per kg is perfectly safe, and may improve the training adaptations to exercise training. http://www.jissn.com/content/4/1/8

 

Another one saying 2 - 2.5kg would be the upper limt: http://journals.huma...nIntakeinHumans

The range of 1.4g/kg to 2g/kg in the JISSN article corresponds with the ranges given in other sources. I read through the full text of the IJSNEM article and it seems their recommendation of a maximum of 2.5g/kg is based more on what they consider to be a maximum safe recommended level of protein intake, rather than what they consider to be an effective level for athletic performance. The latter, again, seems to correspond to the other sources.

 

The general conclusion from the sources seems to be that endurance athletes should be eating between 1.2-1.6g/kg or protein per day, depending on the activity level, while eating more than 2g/kg for any type of activity is just wasting money and eating much more than 2.5g/kg may damage your health (though the evidence for this last number is not comprehensive).

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Emphasis should also be placed on lean body weight. Here's a couple of online calculators using two different methods:

That's what I'd interpreted it as initially, but none of the sources I've found today actually make that distinction. It does seem that most of the sources are making recommendations for athletes who'd typically have lower fat percentages, so the difference between LBM and BM would be less significant anyway.

 

Basing it on LBM, rather than BM would reduce the amount of protein you need to consume, so you should be safe with the recommendations of 2g/kg bodyweight or less.

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if I am not mistaken the body can only absorb 40g of protein at any one time, the rest is flushed. Might need to spread the protein over more meals, but I am no expert, just rememeber this being the rule from the old gym days

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2g per kg is the ratio that bodybuilers use. I went through a silly stage myself and spent too much time in pushing metal. I used to use a mix of protein shake, eggs, beans, chicken, and red meat - spread out over a day. I can assure you taking in 180 - 190 grams of protein is not fun!

 

I'm pretty sure this is waaaay too much for endurance sport!

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Another conflicting article (from a gyming/non endurance point of view). http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/maki1.htm

 

Try the protein calculator at the bottom, gives you 3 different options. (last 2 options seem crazily high). For endurance I don't think this much is necessary.

 

"Another study conducted at the Letterman Army Institute of Research in San Francisco showed that subjects on a higher protein intake (2.8 g/kg/day), coupled with intense strength training, gained a whopping 3.28 kg (7.2 lbs) of lean mass. The study was done over a 40-day period and the subjects were trained to near exhaustion (2). Another study of weightlifters over a 3 month period, with the protein increased from 2.2g/kg/day to 3.5 g/kg/ day, resulted in a 6% increase in muscle mass and a 5% increase in strength."

 

"Hopefully you've been convinced that a high protein intake is not "evil". Protein has been typecast as something that will make you big and strong, but muscle growth is not controlled by the level of protein one takes; rather it is the growth demand caused by intense training or stress that will ultimately determine how much protein one should take in.

 

We don't have to consume an extraordinarily amount of protein, but the proof of the pudding is that taking more than the RDA when exercising is not only safe, but beneficial."

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I'm pretty sure this is waaaay too much for endurance sport!

 

Yes, considering that in endurance, it's the size of the aerobic engine that counts, not the size of the muscles ! The higher your LT (lactic threshold) the longer endurance you'll have. Correct me if I'm wrong.

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