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Tubeless inflation


Sepia

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Nice Write-up Chris F

 

I found that the syringe nozzle clogs quite easily with the fiber bits.

I have a small piece of clear pvc tube on the sealant bottle nozzel that fits over the valve stem, and this gets the fibers into the tyre nicely.. 

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I normally fit without sealant.

 

soapy water on the bead (both sides of the tire) and pump till they go pop.

 

I use a floor pump (except for kenda and maxxis tires, them ******* need a compressor)

 

then I deflate and add sealant via the valve

Great thread guys, any suggestions for preferred tyres in 2.2 for marathon riding with some sidewall protection and not too heavy with decent rolling resistance that will seat without a compressor?

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I might be wrong, but don't you have a valet bill as well. or am I mistaking you with another hubber?

 

Nope. Lucky not the car. Only my front room. Piano was full of the stuff.

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Great thread guys, any suggestions for preferred tyres in 2.2 for marathon riding with some sidewall protection and not too heavy with decent rolling resistance that will seat without a compressor?

 

For that I love the Vittoria Saguaro on rear and Barzo up front.

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Nice Write-up Chris F

 

I found that the syringe nozzle clogs quite easily with the fiber bits.

I have a small piece of clear pvc tube on the sealant bottle nozzel that fits over the valve stem, and this gets the fibers into the tyre nicely.. 

Yep, I do the same. A PVC pipe pushed tightly into the cap hole of a big Stans bottle works too.

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Does inflating a tubeless tire initially (new or old) on the rim (say 21mm) without any sealant enhance the ease of seating the tire with sealant and using a compressor afterwards, with or without the valve core? (if this makes sense)

 

I ask this because it has been suggested that this is the best way. I have tried it but the air escapes before the bead can actually seat itself. This is visually apparent before you even start so how can this be possible?

 

Look forward to the replies.  Thanks

 

If you can't get the tire to seat with a compressor and soapy water, adding sealer to it is likely going to end up with either a miracle cure, or a big, expensive mess. My money is on the latter ...

 

Try:

 

-Take the valve core out (essential).

 

- Check the fit between the valve and the compressor coupling. Typically the coupling is designed to fit a shrader valve, which is a slightly different diameter to a presta valve with the core removed. You loose air through this gap. ChrisF posted a suggestion for this.

 

- Check for restrictions between the compressor tank and the valve. (But removing the regulator might not be a good idea).

 

- I find that keeping the wheel horizontal helps it to seat. I stand the wheel over a plastic bucket, then spread soapy water over the tyre/rim interface. Turn the the wheel over and soap up the other side. You can keep at least the upper side bead virtually submerged in soapy water which will slow down that half of the air escape.

 

Then pump with the compressor. If it does not "pop" turn the wheel over spread more soapy water and try again.

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Nice write up. Maybe you should start a You-Tube channel.

 

But that little nut needs to be tightened with a long nose pliers.  To protect your rim you may want to put down a layer of tape

attachicon.gifTubeless-31.jpg

 

If your push the valve hard into the rim with your thumb then tighten the retainer ring finger tight it should have enough tension to seal the valve when you relieve thumb pressure. (Do this before you fit the tire.)

 

Then you you have a chance of being able to take the valve out again if you have to fit a tube while out on the trail.

Edited by i24
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If you can't get the tire to seat with a compressor and soapy water, adding sealer to it is likely going to end up with either a miracle cure, or a big, expensive mess. My money is on the latter ...

 

Try:

 

-Take the valve core out (essential).

 

- Check the fit between the valve and the compressor coupling. Typically the coupling is designed to fit a shrader valve, which is a slightly different diameter to a presta valve with the core removed. You loose air through this gap. ChrisF posted a suggestion for this.

 

- Check for restrictions between the compressor tank and the valve. (But removing the regulator might not be a good idea).

 

- I find that keeping the wheel horizontal helps it to seat. I stand the wheel over a plastic bucket, then spread soapy water over the tyre/rim interface. Turn the the wheel over and soap up the other side. You can keep at least the upper side bead virtually submerged in soapy water which will slow down that half of the air escape.

 

Then pump with the compressor. If it does not "pop" turn the wheel over spread more soapy water and try again.

Thanks, never tried the horizontal way of doing things as I always hang my wheel.  Otherwise I have tried all the ways mentioned here including the expensive mess.

Edited by Sepia
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Check out Schwalbes RRs 2019 versions...

 

Great thread guys, any suggestions for preferred tyres in 2.2 for marathon riding with some sidewall protection and not too heavy with decent rolling resistance that will seat without a compressor?

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