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Tubeless inflation


Sepia

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Important tip:

 

Once you have added the sealant and you hear the pop as the tyres seat themselves, give it a few more strokes on the pump to ensure the sealant is properly distributed over your ceiling, curtains, walls, carpet, clothes and face...……. 

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Did a set for a friend last night.

 

Here is the process I showed him :

 

- Rim tape (overlapping over the valve hole), take time to ensure the rim tape it fitting properly

 

- fit the valve, consider a bit of masking tape on the rim if you want to use a long nose pliers to tighten the valve

 

- I use a 30 liter compressor, with the regulator set to 3 bar, so decent flow but not excessive pressure. I modified a trigger to have only a rubber hose that I slip over the valve stem, maximum flow ....

 

post-110956-0-51336400-1551291622_thumb.jpg

 

- remove the valve core

 

- Fit the tire, rotate it to where names line up to valves (if that is your thing)

 

- brush with soapy water (dishwashing liquid in water), paint the tire all around, on both sides

 

post-110956-0-90955700-1551291643_thumb.jpg

 

- hang the tire on a bracket, with the valve at the 5-o-clock position (helps to have a nice bracket to keep the tire firm while working...)

 

post-110956-0-83745500-1551291696_thumb.jpg

 

post-110956-0-97650200-1551291714_thumb.jpg

 

- rubber pipe over the valve stem, and give it some air !  Tire pops nicely onto the rim

 

- remove the pipe and the air blows out, but the tire stays mostly in place (dont sweat about the bits that de-bead)

 

- I now use a syringe and add the sealant to the tire (BEST if the valve stem is at 5-o-clock, so that the valve opening is away from the sealant...)

 

post-110956-0-12669500-1551291738_thumb.jpg

 

post-110956-0-30976000-1551291858_thumb.jpg

(please dont sweat the fact that the valve has not been removed for this photo..)

 

Use the sludge\sealant of your choice...

post-110956-0-26423200-1551291791_thumb.jpg

 

- pipe over the valve stem (still NO valve core!), give it some air and re-pop it.

 

- remove the rubber pipe, BUT this time have your valve stem at the ready.  Hold a finger over the valve stem and control the amount of air escaping the tire.  At about 0,2bar (tire very soft if you squeze the sides), insert the valve core and hand tighten.  Only tighten with the tool once you are sure it has seated properly.

 

- Now I use the tire pump to inflate the tire to about 3 bar (higher than riding pressure ...)

 

- remove the tire from the hanger, and shake and turn to ensure the sealant reaches ALL surfaces .....

 

- check the pressure before your first ride, reduce if needed.

 

 

 

EDIT - DISCLAIMER .... I enjoy fiddling in my garage .... so end up making brackets and jigs to make bike maintenance easier ....

Edited by ChrisF
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QUESTION ONE - how much sealant do the experienced riders use for a NEW tubeless setup ?

 

Q2 - How much sealant do you use when topping up ?

 

Q3 - How often do you top up the sealant ?

 

 

 

For a lack of better experience, this is what I have done thus far :

We used half a bottle per tire, ie about 100ml of the Sludge Uni-seal.

 

For a top-up I typically use 50ml

 

On my commuter I lost track of time, and topped up when I realised a hole from a thorn in the front wheel did not seal quickly ....  On the MTB I try to do it every 3 to 4 months, I end up doing it before "big races" ....  I have since started recording the dates of top-ups, so maybe I will now get a better idea of intervals between top-ups ....

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QUESTION ONE - how much sealant do the experienced riders use for a NEW tubeless setup ?

 

Q2 - How much sealant do you use when topping up ?

 

Q3 - How often do you top up the sealant ?

 

 

 

For a lack of better experience, this is what I have done thus far :

We used half a bottle per tire, ie about 100ml of the Sludge Uni-seal.

 

For a top-up I typically use 50ml

 

On my commuter I lost track of time, and topped up when I realised a hole from a thorn in the front wheel did not seal quickly .... On the MTB I try to do it every 3 to 4 months, I end up doing it before "big races" .... I have since started recording the dates of top-ups, so maybe I will now get a better idea of intervals between top-ups ....

Inital setup, I go large... 200ml...

 

Topups,anywhwre between 50 and 100ml

 

Before each ride I try to give the bike a good shake... If I can hear sloshing, the sealant is still good... If not, top up time...

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I probably install 5-10 tyres a week and use a nice, but not overly fancy track pump. It's a MTB high volume one by Lezyne, but not one with a pressure chamber.

 

Let's assume we're talking about tubeless ready tyres and rims designed for use with such tyres, ok?

 

I wrap the tape around the rim twice, install the tyre on one side, add sealant and close the tyre. I then spray a soapy mixture from a spray bottle between tyre and rim, and pump until the tyre seats. I don't stop pumping until I reach 3 bar, or the tyre has seated evenly on both sides, all the way around.

 

If you're struggling to get your tyres to seat, you're either using non-tubeless-ready tyres, or your rims aren't designed for tubeless i.e. they don't have a tubeless-specific inner profile:

 

 

If your rim looks like the one on the left, don't use it tubeless. If you have a flat out no the trail, you'll really struggle to get it inflated again and will have to put in a tube. If your rim looks like the one on the right, the tyre should stay seated even with a flat, and you should be able to plug the hole and get going again.

Almost how I do it, also with a high volume Lezane pump. I just haven't needed the soapy water to get the tyre to seat. I just try to make sure the bead of the tyre is as close to the rim hook as possible.

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Important tip:

 

Once you have added the sealant and you hear the pop as the tyres seat themselves, give it a few more strokes on the pump to ensure the sealant is properly distributed over your ceiling, curtains, walls, carpet, clothes and face...……. 

 

I have the T-shirt  :clap:

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With mountain bike tyres i never had issues maybe after many years of experience you know what to expect...

 

But today it was time to add the sealant to the new mavic UST road wheels.

 

Watched the video of them adding sealant with the syringe looks so simple,

 

Needless to by the time I think I got 35 to 40 ml into each wheel I has almost emptied the 120 ml bottle that came in the kit the rest was over the floor the ceiling most furniture within a 2 meter radius quite a bit over my face hands what a frigging mess.

 

Maybe now I know what can happen I will be better second time but made a real mess of it.

 

:blush: 

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I probably install 5-10 tyres a week and use a nice, but not overly fancy track pump. It's a MTB high volume one by Lezyne, but not one with a pressure chamber.

 

Let's assume we're talking about tubeless ready tyres and rims designed for use with such tyres, ok?

 

I wrap the tape around the rim twice, install the tyre on one side, add sealant and close the tyre. I then spray a soapy mixture from a spray bottle between tyre and rim, and pump until the tyre seats. I don't stop pumping until I reach 3 bar, or the tyre has seated evenly on both sides, all the way around.

 

If you're struggling to get your tyres to seat, you're either using non-tubeless-ready tyres, or your rims aren't designed for tubeless i.e. they don't have a tubeless-specific inner profile:

 

 

If your rim looks like the one on the left, don't use it tubeless. If you have a flat out no the trail, you'll really struggle to get it inflated again and will have to put in a tube. If your rim looks like the one on the right, the tyre should stay seated even with a flat, and you should be able to plug the hole and get going again.

 

 

Just a word of warning. pump to 2 bar and then bounce the tyre to get it to seat- here is my reasoning.....

 

I woke up early to go for a ride knowing I had a new tyre to fit quick before ride. Fitted tyre all fine prepped my syringe with sealant and chucked the bike in the back of my X1 with the idea of stopping at a garage and inflating on way to riding venue.

 

Chuck the sealant in, start inflating(in the back of the car with door open at petrol station) didn't hear the pop of a tyre seating ->kept adding air.

Stans Crest rims have a max pressure of 2.6bar. At near 3 bar which is also where i used to draw the line my wheel exploded, rim buckled right in my hands and I mean exploded like BOOM!

When a tyre explodes in your hands/face it is really not ideal. Slime in my eyes, ears ringing, petrol attendants looking like they seen a ghost. Took me a minute or 2 to regather my thoughts, and 4 hours to clean the stan's slime out the inside of the car. It reached everywhere, even in the aircon ducts below windscreen. Rim buckled so bad there were tiny cracks at the spoke nipples.

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Here is a little "pro tip" HA HA HA 

 

Seriously though, I have done all my tubeless setups myself without any issues. So I recently had an issue where I could not get a set of 27.5x2.25 Racing Ralphs to seat up...used soapy water and floor pump, Co2 bomb, compressor, etc. and I even put more rim tape on to build it up a bit. Bear in mind I had been running a DHF and Aggressor setup on these rims. 

 

Eventually I ended up (don't you dare judge till you've done it) taking the inner tube and pulling it around the outside of the wheel over the tyre with the valve facing out (oviaz) and just gave it a touch of air. This pushed the tyre flattish but held the beads against the rim helping air to stay in. Seated with floor pump and then added sealant afterwards and had no issues (they popped) 

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Here is a little "pro tip" HA HA HA 

 

Seriously though, I have done all my tubeless setups myself without any issues. So I recently had an issue where I could not get a set of 27.5x2.25 Racing Ralphs to seat up...used soapy water and floor pump, Co2 bomb, compressor, etc. and I even put more rim tape on to build it up a bit. Bear in mind I had been running a DHF and Aggressor setup on these rims. 

 

Eventually I ended up (don't you dare judge till you've done it) taking the inner tube and pulling it around the outside of the wheel over the tyre with the valve facing out (oviaz) and just gave it a touch of air. This pushed the tyre flattish but held the beads against the rim helping air to stay in. Seated with floor pump and then added sealant afterwards and had no issues (they popped) 

 

That's basically like using a strap around the tyre, like mentioned in the other thread. 

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That's basically like using a strap around the tyre, like mentioned in the other thread. 

I never read about strap on the other thread, only read this one. Almost everyone has an old inner tube floating around but most people don't have straps lying around. The tube give nice even pressure from the get go where you may need to fiddle with the strap (just my thought - I haven't tried a strap but same principal... as long as it can help a fellow rider in need) 

Edited by LOCO4360
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Just a word of warning. pump to 2 bar and then bounce the tyre to get it to seat- here is my reasoning.....

 

I woke up early to go for a ride knowing I had a new tyre to fit quick before ride. Fitted tyre all fine prepped my syringe with sealant and chucked the bike in the back of my X1 with the idea of stopping at a garage and inflating on way to riding venue.

 

Chuck the sealant in, start inflating(in the back of the car with door open at petrol station) didn't hear the pop of a tyre seating ->kept adding air.

Stans Crest rims have a max pressure of 2.6bar. At near 3 bar which is also where i used to draw the line my wheel exploded, rim buckled right in my hands and I mean exploded like BOOM!

When a tyre explodes in your hands/face it is really not ideal. Slime in my eyes, ears ringing, petrol attendants looking like they seen a ghost. Took me a minute or 2 to regather my thoughts, and 4 hours to clean the stan's slime out the inside of the car. It reached everywhere, even in the aircon ducts below windscreen. Rim buckled so bad there were tiny cracks at the spoke nipples.

ouch

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Does the soapy water have any impact on the sealant?

As far as i am concerned I would not think so.  I just want to get this one tyre sealed.

Damn, it is proving problematic.  Next step, heat gun on the side walls.

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