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Gearing and speed


The Ghost
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Alright clever folks of the hub.

Looking at these specs,

 

CASSETTE

SRAM XG 1150, 11-speed, 10-42t

 

CHAINRINGS

40T

 

RUBBER

700x38c

 

at about what speed will I no longer be able to peddle and add value (top out) assuming cadences of 80, 90 and 100 rpm?

 

Thanks

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It depends on how fast your social group rides!

 

That gearing at 100 rpm will give you 50+ kph. You'll probably spin out on downhills and struggle to turn your max gear at 100 rpm on the flat? Ride what you've got and modify if you really feel the urge to ride differently in a social setting?

 

 

Thanks that is very useful.

 

Would you say that’s a bit light for social racing, should I be looking at options that allow pedalling to a slightly higher speed?

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The thing is that I don’t have that bike yet, it’s a pending purchase and I’m not sure if I should be going to that 1 x or if I should rather look at something like this

 

 

CASSETTE

Shimano Ultegra, 11-speed, 11-34t

 

CHAINRINGS

48/32T

 

Opinions welcome [emoji16]

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It depends on how fast your social group rides!

 

That gearing at 100 rpm will give you 50+ kph. You'll probably spin out on downhills and struggle to turn your max gear at 100 rpm on the flat? Ride what you've got and modify if you really feel the urge to ride differently in a social setting?

 

 

 

What does a lower level club run achieve these days, average 30kph?

 

Probably exactly that, spin out on the downs and breathe hard on the flat.

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I’m running a 38 front chainring with an e thirteen xcx 9-34 cassette. I’m finding the range excellent, and without getting into the gear ratios, it maxes out at a slightly slower speed than if you were running a 50 front chainring and the 11 tooth on the rear cassette.

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I'm not a club, or even that frequent a group rider, but 30 kph average sounds quite strong. Others can comment perhaps?

 

Is social group riding the primary purpose of the bike? With 38mm tyres, it sounds like a gravel bike perhaps? If so, don't overlook what you want to do on gravel...

 

My gravel bike (steel and quite heavy) has 38mm tyres and 50/34 and 11/36. I'm about to go to 46/34 and 11/40. Top-end isn't a big deal for me on the road (spin and tuck!) but rather bottom-end on steep gravel and on-road touring. Horses for courses!

 

 

What does a lower level club run achieve these days, average 30kph?

 

Probably exactly that, spin out on the downs and breathe hard on the flat.

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I'm not a club, or even that frequent a group rider, but 30 kph average sounds quite strong. Others can comment perhaps?

 

Is social group riding the primary purpose of the bike? With 38mm tyres, it sounds like a gravel bike perhaps? If so, don't overlook what you want to do on gravel...

 

My gravel bike (steel and quite heavy) has 38mm tyres and 50/34 and 11/36. I'm about to go to 46/34 and 11/40. Top-end isn't a big deal for me on the road (spin and tuck!) but rather bottom-end on steep gravel and on-road touring. Horses for courses!

 

 

 

It is a gravel bike indeed, but it will be used primarily as a road machine, I’m considering putting some narrower rubber on it or just slicker rubber depending on what is available and the cost.

This is essentially the conundrum, it’s a gravel bike that I want to be my road bike because of its geometry, but I don’t want to be short in the gears department either.

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Fusion's advice is sound.

 

A tangent...why not go for a comfort/endurance geometry road bike?

 

And don't forget...whatever the gearing, you still need the engine to drive it.

 

It is a gravel bike indeed, but it will be used primarily as a road machine, I’m considering putting some narrower rubber on it or just slicker rubber depending on what is available and the cost.

This is essentially the conundrum, it’s a gravel bike that I want to be my road bike because of its geometry, but I don’t want to be short in the gears department either.

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Fusion's advice is sound.

 

A tangent...why not go for a comfort/endurance geometry road bike?

 

And don't forget...whatever the gearing, you still need the engine to drive it.

 

 

There is an endurance bike on the short list that isn’t particularly far off the measurements of the gravel, but the truth is I don’t even know yet if I can make the gravel geometry work for my circumstances as even that may be too stretched out for me. I’ll know when the bike shops open and I get my hands on the test units.

But also the more I watch videos on bikes and stuff and think about the kind of riding and the condition of roads and paving etc the more I’m tempted to get something with the wider rubber 32 to 38.

 

I know I’ll never finish a race in the top 50% but I’m likely to want to pop into the odd gravel road as I explore. I would however like to do some club rides and not fall off the back of a bus [emoji1]

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