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Base Heart Zone?


Peperman
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I have been cycling for about 8 years now, and only in the last two years i used a heart rate monitor. Ive been all over the net, reading training articles on this topic. The experts say that the majority of ones training "BASE" should be between 65-70%. But when i train i reach this zone very fast, and it feels as if im wasting my time. Should i take it up a bit for base training? Ive only started traininng for two months now, and would like to go through all the heart training stages. Any advice please?? Maybe a long term training program??Shocked

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Hi Peperman

 

Don't want to hijack your thread but was wondering if someone could explain how the percentage of heart rate is calculated.

 

Is is a straight percentage of your estimated maximum or something a little more complicated?

 

Surely the resting heart rate should be taken into account?
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Peperman, I have found the same, BUT, as you get fitter, faster and stronger you'll find it easier to stay in the HR range.  I have also found that keeping my HR in this range I recover a lot quicker after a hard day o the bike.  To give you an example:

 

Day 1: Hill repeats (ask the guys here, I'm NOT built for going up!!!).

Day 2: LSD 55 - 70% of Max HR.

Day 3: Legs are recovered and I'm ready for more "ek gaan jou BREEK!"

 

Mark C, most coaches/books that I know of/have worked with, work purely on Max HR.  I have found this to be an easier way of working than the Karvoven method.  So what this means is (figures are examples ok Spidey and MWNN and R2D2 and MuXmAn!!):

75 % of Max HR: 200 x 75% = 150

Karvoven method:

Max HR = 200

Resting HR = 50 (I wish!!)

(200 - 50) * 75% + 50 = 162.5

 

But using the Karvoven method FORCES you to take your resting HR every morning.  I know I should do this as well, but at 03:00 I find it difficult to find the alarm!!!

 

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You take your heart rate max and subtract your resting pulse.Then you use this to calculate the desired percentage.And then you add your resting pulse again.

 

eg: rest = 45, max = 200.

 

we're gonna calc your 60% zone....

 

200-45 = 155(this is your working pulse)

 

155x0.6=93

 

93+45(resting pulse)=138

 

this is how I learned to calculate it.

 

Hope it makes sense?Wink
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Thanks ewep & Kriek

That makes sense!

 

Kriek, your reference to 'working pulse' makes this method more accurate in my opinion. Do heart rate monitors take this into account?
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Mark C, not the Polar (I use the S720).  The HRM takes your max HR as entered and displays the % of Max according to that.

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I have been cycling for about 8 years now' date=' [/quote']

 

Hi Peperman.  Welcome to the hub!!

8 years hey?  Then you should know that your body decides most of what is happening or not.  I.e. if you do not feel like sprinting today or doing Steady state intervals, you should rest.  Never loose sight of this!!

 

and only in the last two years i used a heart rate monitor. Ive been all over the net' date=' reading training articles on this topic. [/quote']

Info is power.  Read as much as you can.  But know that HR is not the end all and be all.  In most races you will see the pros stick sticky tape over the HR monitors.  Don't want to see what is going on.....only listens to the body.

That said, for us mear plets, the HR monitor is a useful tool helping you with progress etc.

 

 

The experts say that the majority of ones training "BASE" should be between 65-70%. But when i train i reach this zone very fast' date=' and it feels as if im wasting my time. [/quote']

 

Base is important....but don't for ONE second think you will not have a good race if you did not do enough base training in the months preceding the event. 

If you HR goes over the 65-70% and you feel good, you should go over...but not for long periods of time.  Have fun.  Ride your bike.  Go climb hills.   Get the HR up.

After the ride you look back and see that your AVG HR is 65-70% and that is what matters!!!!

 

Should i take it up a bit for base training? Ive only started traininng for two months now' date=' and would like to go through all the heart training stages. Any advice please?? Maybe a long term training program??Shocked
[/quote']

 

Go see a professional.  It really helps a LOT!!  Let them work out a program for you based on your current fitness and work towards a goal....i.e. Argus or 94.7 or whatever your fancy.

Gives you a purpose to go train hard on big days and take it EASY on small days.

 

If you are based in Pretoria / Johannesburg, give this dude a call.  He is good!

 

 
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Hi Spinnekop

 

This is very motivational! I am based in Hartebeespoort area, not far from Pta, so i will take your advice on the coaching!!

 

Thanks!!
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No problem!

 

Enjoy the riding.  Being in Harties, you have some of the BEST places to ride in. 

As long as you enjoy every ride, you will improve and the fitness will come along.......slowly but steadely.

Having a program and a goal, gives structure and a sence that you are actually going forward in your training.

 

Good luck!!! 
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