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Chain replace & cassette


Cassie
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OK, here's a topic that haven't been bandied around for a while....

 

I'm NOT going to go into stretched chains... ;) we all know that cannot happen!!

 

BUT, last night (on a whim)I decided to put my new chain on - replacing the HG_73 one with a brand spanking new SRAM PG91(??) or something to that accord.

 

I measured the old chain and it was 1/16inch out over 12inches (24 links)...so clearly time for replacement....but not cassette yet?

 

I also did notice some visible wear on my cassette (XT one). BUT no chain issues up till now, whatsover!!

 

So, with new chain on - could not even make it around the block...chain jumping all over the place and generally unhappy!

 

Put "old" chain back on and all is hunkey dorey!

 

Now, for the million dollar question: DO just keep riding my drivetrain till it staerts giving issues? I.e sucking & skipping...and THEN replace both cassette & chain? That could be many 100's km into the future.

 

OR do I replace cassette now? and then with what? new XT again or SRAM (to match my new chain?)

 

I'm inclined to ride that sucker into the ground and see how much more km's I can get from it...

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The fact that your new chain is skipping on the old cassette might mean the cassette needs replacement already.

 

I am sitting with the same dilemma and have decided to ride both pretty much stukkend before replacing the chain and cassette. Why replace it now when you can still get some good km's out of the old stuff? On the mtb anyway. On the roadbike I replace chains quite often but not cassettes so much.

 

Next time replace your chain a lot sooner and your cassette will last much longer ... theoretically anyway.

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Just remember you're also riding your front chainrings stukkend.

 

I had 15 000+ km's on my previous road chainring before that needed replacement.

They do not go as quickly as the saleman would want you to believe.

 

Edit: Nope sorry was around 15 000km's, just checked.

Edited by Tankman
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How I figure it: as the chain wears, so the pitch changes. So beyond a certain point of wear of the chain, it will start doing damage to the cassette, because that pitch ain't changing, the load will not be evenly distributed on the teeth, which accelerates wear, and then you will have to replace them both, plus the chain rings possibly. There is also general wear on the cassette/rings would should be monitored.

 

So you need to keep a close eye on the chain wear: Park Tool works for me, but not others here, so lets leave it at that.

Edited by kosmonooit
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yes, that's actually what prompted me to change the chain...I saw the wear starting to show on the caseete (especially my favourite gears)...BUT now I'm back on the old chain and seems that I'll have to change both (past point of no return??)at some stage...so i recon - ride them both stukkend, thenreplace both. That will be ~1000km or so into the future?

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Same thing happend to me on friday, so i replaced the cassette with slx and a sram chain!

i kept the old parts so i can ride them "stukkend" as soon as my chainrings are almost done!

 

1000 bucks later tho...

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I've been through this debate many times in my mind before and I've decided to ride my drivetrain until it gives in. I reckon that makes more financial sense than changing chains whenever they are worn. Each chain is at least R250, and you would probably use 3/4 chains before you need to replace a cassette and chain rings. So that's +-R1k that will pay for your new drivetrain when it eventually does need to be replaced for a big event or does bomb out.

 

So ride it until it gives in or until you have your next big stage race, because if you break something on a stage race and the drivetrain is worn, its gonna cost big $$$ as the bike shops at events are a rip off, as well as big aggravation.

Edited by Zula
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A worn chain kills the chainrings and rear deraileur jockey wheels. To me it makes much more financial sense to use cheapish chains and replace them frequently. Destroying your whole drivetrain because of a worn chain is crazy - it costs WAY more and you risk having a snapped chain rip you rear deraileur to pieces.

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"A worn chain kills the chainrings and rear deraileur jockey wheels. To me it makes much more financial sense to use cheapish chains and replace them frequently. Destroying your whole drivetrain because of a worn chain is crazy - it costs WAY more and you risk having a snapped chain rip you rear deraileur to pieces."

 

I am also tryin this. I bought XT chains for about R200 each on CRC about a year ago. The trick is to rotate them faster but then go back to the old chain once you have no new chains left. The reason for this is a worn chain shapes the teeth of whatever it touches. You should get triple the milage out your drivetrain this way.

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A worn chain kills the chainrings and rear deraileur jockey wheels. To me it makes much more financial sense to use cheapish chains and replace them frequently. Destroying your whole drivetrain because of a worn chain is crazy - it costs WAY more and you risk having a snapped chain rip you rear deraileur to pieces.

 

I have just replaced my XT jockey wheels with some Taxx I bought online for R100 or so, they had just clocked 7500 odd K's!

I just replace chain and cassette, costs me around R500 (Deore cassette and SRAM 971 chain , 9 speed).

I will replace my chainring next time (i.e the third time I replace chain and cassette).

Last chain and cassette did about 3000km, I only replaced them as I had a few Rand to spend and it was hurting my wallet! At that stage there was no slipping.

I also wash and relube the chain after every ride and once a week or so clean the chain ring and cassette (I use squirt so it leaves a build up after a while).

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