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Very much depends on the severity of the break, my neighbor had a clean break but still went the op route, was back on the MTB in 7 days (mainly green routes for a while though), another mate took around 6 weeks to get comfortable enough to ride.

Awesome. Starting to sound more promising!

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A colleague didn't break his but it did separate from the shoulder and was close to popping through the skin. Inflammation was too high for surgery so three weeks of healing in a sling. Clavicle is now in a weird position making a rather ugly bump on his shoulder, but no need for surgery.

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Jacques, I was in your place this time last year. Broke clavicle in the center with a big wedge broken out that then cracked into two pieces. It was very loose but even though the clavicle was mush the shoulder was still more or less at the right place.

 

My RSA surgeon looked at it for 5min and booked my in for the OP.

 

Since I don't like metal in my body I sent the X-Rays to a friend's dad in Germany who is a seasoned Ortho Surgeon. To my surprise he asked why I want this operated. And to my second surprise he started to explain to me all the risks attached to the surgery that I wasn't explained before. So I went back to my local doc and asked him if, with all medical scrutiny applied, this could not be allowed to heal naturally? I asked if he could support me if I went this route. The third surprise was that he said that this was an unusual request but yes it would be possible and he would support me. I went that route and never looked back.

 

There some facts about this op that are not often explained well enough:

1) Firstly you must know that your bone has an excellent healing mechanism. It will grow fastest and strongest where it feels stress.

2) Now if you put in that plate you will regain instant stability and alignment. But the plate will take on a lot of stresses away form the bone. In the coming weeks and months your bone will heal but due to the presence of the plate will not become as strong as if without.

3) If you decided to have the plate removed (which you should for various reasons) you will go through the same recovery period again because now your bone has to strengthen itself because the strong plate is gone. Plus, chances are, that your medical aid will only paid for the first OP and not the removal. This could be quite expensive. So the decision you make now will most likely include two operations and two recovery periods, and a pile of cash. This point is often waved aside with the option given to keep the plate permanently. However if you fall again on the same place with the plate in you run the risk to create a real mess that will be much more difficult to repair.

 

My personal advise to you is therefore:

1) Unless you are a professional cyclist and race for your career forget the K2C. On recreational basis this is very shortsighted thinking. Even with he plate you should not do impact sports for 3 months (that is if you ask a non RSA doctor). (I know the pain, I had to give up my W2W entry last year...)

2) Speak to your doctor again. Ask him if the operation is medically necessary. The question is if your shoulders are still aligned and at the right place or not and if the break is in the middle or close to a joint. They also look at the nerve that runs close by.

3) If natural healing has medical merit you must think about your choices. You know from my writeup what I chose.

 

My doc gave me reassurance that we would reassess my healing after one and two weeks and test the shoulder movement. The operation can be done many weeks in if things don't turn out right. However after two weeks he told me I don't need to come back.

 

Just to conclude it is worth saying that my healing progress was an amazing experience: After one week a big callus formed enclosing all the bone pieces and giving back stability to the shoulder (before that I could move around the bone pieces). I could sleep well on the back and wear the sling comfortably. After 3 weeks I dumped the sling and started using the arm for low level activities. After 6 weeks I was back on the commuting bike. The arm and shoulder were pain free unless stretched over the head. Still very bump sensitive though. I had to force myself to stay off the MTB for another 6 weeks but I did.

 

I am writing all this because I feel that the doctors here as well as the people are running way to fast to the operating table, and often for the wrong reasons. The body is an amazing machine and can mend itself better than many think.

 

Whatever you decide to do I wish you good luck and speedy recovery!

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Jacques, I was in your place this time last year. Broke clavicle in the center with a big wedge broken out that then cracked into two pieces. It was very loose but even though the clavicle was mush the shoulder was still more or less at the right place.

 

My RSA surgeon looked at it for 5min and booked my in for the OP.

 

Since I don't like metal in my body I sent the X-Rays to a friend's dad in Germany who is a seasoned Ortho Surgeon. To my surprise he asked why I want this operated. And to my second surprise he started to explain to me all the risks attached to the surgery that I wasn't explained before. So I went back to my local doc and asked him if, with all medical scrutiny applied, this could not be allowed to heal naturally? I asked if he could support me if I went this route. The third surprise was that he said that this was an unusual request but yes it would be possible and he would support me. I went that route and never looked back.

 

There some facts about this op that are not often explained well enough:

1) Firstly you must know that your bone has an excellent healing mechanism. It will grow fastest and strongest where it feels stress.

2) Now if you put in that plate you will regain instant stability and alignment. But the plate will take on a lot of stresses away form the bone. In the coming weeks and months your bone will heal but due to the presence of the plate will not become as strong as if without.

3) If you decided to have the plate removed (which you should for various reasons) you will go through the same recovery period again because now your bone has to strengthen itself because the strong plate is gone. Plus, chances are, that your medical aid will only paid for the first OP and not the removal. This could be quite expensive. So the decision you make now will most likely include two operations and two recovery periods, and a pile of cash. This point is often waved aside with the option given to keep the plate permanently. However if you fall again on the same place with the plate in you run the risk to create a real mess that will be much more difficult to repair.

 

My personal advise to you is therefore:

1) Unless you are a professional cyclist and race for your career forget the K2C. On recreational basis this is very shortsighted thinking. Even with he plate you should not do impact sports for 3 months (that is if you ask a non RSA doctor). (I know the pain, I had to give up my W2W entry last year...)

2) Speak to your doctor again. Ask him if the operation is medically necessary. The question is if your shoulders are still aligned and at the right place or not and if the break is in the middle or close to a joint. They also look at the nerve that runs close by.

3) If natural healing has medical merit you must think about your choices. You know from my writeup what I chose.

 

My doc gave me reassurance that we would reassess my healing after one and two weeks and test the shoulder movement. The operation can be done many weeks in if things don't turn out right. However after two weeks he told me I don't need to come back.

 

Just to conclude it is worth saying that my healing progress was an amazing experience: After one week a big callus formed enclosing all the bone pieces and giving back stability to the shoulder (before that I could move around the bone pieces). I could sleep well on the back and wear the sling comfortably. After 3 weeks I dumped the sling and started using the arm for low level activities. After 6 weeks I was back on the commuting bike. The arm and shoulder were pain free unless stretched over the head. Still very bump sensitive though. I had to force myself to stay off the MTB for another 6 weeks but I did.

 

I am writing all this because I feel that the doctors here as well as the people are running way to fast to the operating table, and often for the wrong reasons. The body is an amazing machine and can mend itself better than many think.

 

Whatever you decide to do I wish you good luck and speedy recovery!

Do you think the bones would join again if it's far apart like mine? Posted the pics earlier. I asked my orthopaedic if I can leave it to heal on its own and he said he needs to operate as the distance between the bones is too far apart.

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Do you think the bones would join again if it's far apart like mine? Posted the pics earlier. I asked my orthopaedic if I can leave it to heal on its own and he said he needs to operate as the distance between the bones is too far apart.

And that is in essence the issue. Have a mate who chose not to operate. Three weeks of pin later with the bones still not joined he had it plated. Another friend broke hers falling off a horse. Three weeks later she rebooked the bones rolling over in her sleep and then had it plated.

 

Me I would talk to an expert. As in someone who has actually been to a university and studied this stuff for years and then been given a degree. A medical doctor in other words. They usually know their stuff.

Edited by HappyMartin
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Jacques, I was in your place this time last year. Broke clavicle in the center with a big wedge broken out that then cracked into two pieces. It was very loose but even though the clavicle was mush the shoulder was still more or less at the right place.

My RSA surgeon looked at it for 5min and booked my in for the OP.

Since I don't like metal in my body I sent the X-Rays to a friend's dad in Germany who is a seasoned Ortho Surgeon. To my surprise he asked why I want this operated. And to my second surprise he started to explain to me all the risks attached to the surgery that I wasn't explained before. So I went back to my local doc and asked him if, with all medical scrutiny applied, this could not be allowed to heal naturally? I asked if he could support me if I went this route. The third surprise was that he said that this was an unusual request but yes it would be possible and he would support me. I went that route and never looked back.

There some facts about this op that are not often explained well enough:

1) Firstly you must know that your bone has an excellent healing mechanism. It will grow fastest and strongest where it feels stress.

2) Now if you put in that plate you will regain instant stability and alignment. But the plate will take on a lot of stresses away form the bone. In the coming weeks and months your bone will heal but due to the presence of the plate will not become as strong as if without.

3) If you decided to have the plate removed (which you should for various reasons) you will go through the same recovery period again because now your bone has to strengthen itself because the strong plate is gone. Plus, chances are, that your medical aid will only paid for the first OP and not the removal. This could be quite expensive. So the decision you make now will most likely include two operations and two recovery periods, and a pile of cash. This point is often waved aside with the option given to keep the plate permanently. However if you fall again on the same place with the plate in you run the risk to create a real mess that will be much more difficult to repair.

My personal advise to you is therefore:

1) Unless you are a professional cyclist and race for your career forget the K2C. On recreational basis this is very shortsighted thinking. Even with he plate you should not do impact sports for 3 months (that is if you ask a non RSA doctor). (I know the pain, I had to give up my W2W entry last year...)

2) Speak to your doctor again. Ask him if the operation is medically necessary. The question is if your shoulders are still aligned and at the right place or not and if the break is in the middle or close to a joint. They also look at the nerve that runs close by.

3) If natural healing has medical merit you must think about your choices. You know from my writeup what I chose.

My doc gave me reassurance that we would reassess my healing after one and two weeks and test the shoulder movement. The operation can be done many weeks in if things don't turn out right. However after two weeks he told me I don't need to come back.

Just to conclude it is worth saying that my healing progress was an amazing experience: After one week a big callus formed enclosing all the bone pieces and giving back stability to the shoulder (before that I could move around the bone pieces). I could sleep well on the back and wear the sling comfortably. After 3 weeks I dumped the sling and started using the arm for low level activities. After 6 weeks I was back on the commuting bike. The arm and shoulder were pain free unless stretched over the head. Still very bump sensitive though. I had to force myself to stay off the MTB for another 6 weeks but I did.

I am writing all this because I feel that the doctors here as well as the people are running way to fast to the operating table, and often for the wrong reasons. The body is an amazing machine and can mend itself better than many think.

Whatever you decide to do I wish you good luck and speedy recovery!

Thanks for the comprehensive feedback. I understand fully. I do feel comfrtable going for the op. My surgeon has delayed the op now for almost a week to see if the bones will align and not require surgery, but after more xrays yesterday, we could see that the bones are further apart overlapping each other now and seems surgery is the only way to align it. One part of the bone has moved up further and almost protruding through my skin. So I'm comfortable going for the operation. I just hope now recover is speedy. So unnecessary, I'm addicted to being on my bike.

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Broke my collerbone 7 weeks ago today.

Also had a plate fitted.

Have been on the IDT from week 4. Could have started earlier, but cycling is not my job, so I took it easy.

Will start going on the road this weekend, but taking it easy. (riding with the kids) No serious single track or racing for a while still.

AS mentioned, even after you get movement back, the shoulder muscles is still very weak. I am doing my exercises every night.

Edited by IH8MUD
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I ripped all the ligaments (3 grade) tear in my AC. Walked with it for 8 weeks in a sling and nothing attached, had to go in for surgery last week Tuesday to rebuild my shoulder .... Looking better but off from riding for another 8 weeks

 

post-74296-1438877861,0593.jpg

 

post-74296-1438877877,5654.jpg

 

post-74296-1438877890,7574.jpg

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Broke mine in 4 places. Two days to surgery. Was back on the IDT the following week. Back on bike in 4. Did the DC 7ish weeks later.

 

Having said that I would suggest you sus it out closer to the time. The K2C has that massive decent and could put a lot of pressure on your clavicle for a sustained time.

 

If you do crash in 6 weeks, expect a piece of steel to pop out your shoulder.

 

Edit: get physio asap for movement. And tell them to not be gentle, it hurts, but they speed up recovery time.

Edited by Patchelicious
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Thanks for the comprehensive feedback. I understand fully. I do feel comfrtable going for the op. My surgeon has delayed the op now for almost a week to see if the bones will align and not require surgery, but after more xrays yesterday, we could see that the bones are further apart overlapping each other now and seems surgery is the only way to align it. One part of the bone has moved up further and almost protruding through my skin. So I'm comfortable going for the operation. I just hope now recover is speedy. So unnecessary, I'm addicted to being on my bike.

 

One can also get the plate taken out at a later stage if you want.

I had the choice of surgery or no surgery, but the decision was quickly made just looking at a mirror with one shoulder slightly higher than the other. 

You only have one set of shoulders. You can ride K2C next year. It is gonna rain this year anyway :).

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amazing how we will put ourselves through so much for that instant gratification without really thinking through the long term impact and being a bit patient. Missing a ride/race for health reasons seems a logical one. But not so easy to execute as you want it NOW......

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Do you think the bones would join again if it's far apart like mine? Posted the pics earlier. I asked my orthopaedic if I can leave it to heal on its own and he said he needs to operate as the distance between the bones is too far apart.

I did this almost to the week a year ago. 

 

Have the op! Why?

1. I did not and it still has not knitted. No pain, just issues with it moving depending on the weight of the items etc. being lifted.

2. Healing time IS drastically reduced.

 

Then re recovery, I was on the IDT within a week and on the road with a sling in 2. (Probably why it never knitted. too much movement) Pain on the bike is minimal. Rather ride MTB  ON THE ROAD. Then move onto road bike on the road.

 

All bumps are an issue, bit if you are comfortable riding with your arm in a sling no major worries.

 

HAVE the op. I an scheduling to have it done as soon as my medical is back up to date!

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I did this almost to the week a year ago. 

 

Have the op! Why?

1. I did not and it still has not knitted. No pain, just issues with it moving depending on the weight of the items etc. being lifted.

2. Healing time IS drastically reduced.

 

Then re recovery, I was on the IDT within a week and on the road with a sling in 2. (Probably why it never knitted. too much movement) Pain on the bike is minimal. Rather ride MTB  ON THE ROAD. Then move onto road bike on the road.

 

All bumps are an issue, bit if you are comfortable riding with your arm in a sling no major worries.

 

HAVE the op. I an scheduling to have it done as soon as my medical is back up to date!

Had operation last week Thursday. Pain is still a big issue. Wish it will go away.

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