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MTB with perscription glasses


Echo25
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Hi.

 

New to MTB'ing and wanted to hear others experience with riding with Prescription glasses. Do you wear protectives over, Do you have perscription sunglasses or do contact lenses.

 

Thanks in advance

I use prescription lenses in my Oakley Jawbones. Works great

 

mud/sweat in contact lenses, eish...

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Please let me know where you guys did the Oakley prescription lenses

 

How do you find the Rudy P clip ons

have your optometrist order them from Oakley. They will be made in Ireland so will take a couple of weeks

 

you might find photochromatic not that great for mtb. as you transition from bright sunlight to dappled tree shade, the lenses take too long to clear and the rocks arn't forgiving...

Edited by Li Mu Bai
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So at the CTC2019 this year I came accross this breand "Ocean"

They have a clip over suglasses thats 400uv and Polarised. Costed me R280

Its a lot cheaper than all the other options and literally just slides over your prescription glasses. I use mine now for driving, cycling and everywhere the sun is a bit sharp

 

https://oceaneyewear.co.za/product/pj590/

 

This is not the exact one I have but it will give you a idea. They fit perfectly over without making it look like you have something over your glasses.

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Something to consider is that Aliexpress.com sell cheap prescription classes for under 2 dollars. I bought some with my script and they work fine. Pretty strong too.

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You do have a couple of options here: 

  • Go with contacts - this will as per the other folks here already mentioned be an easy option if your eyes can handle putting your finger into your eyes every morning (some folks find it easy - my eyes are way too sensitive and I can't get used to it :D)
  • Find a brand that offers inserts - Adidas, Smith, Rudi - the downside with this has already been mentioned, the inserts sits closer to your face and fogs up and you struggle to see everything especially in the corners if the inserts are too small. 
  • You could go to an optometrist and do one of a few things: 
  1. Get a pair of sunnies and have them remove the lenses and order you a set from the manufacturer. Now bear in mind that this will be the most expensive option, a manufacturer like Oakley pours all their R&D money into the quality of the lenses. Therefore you will pay to have the same amount of said coatings fitted with your prescription lenses. It will also take an eternity to get ordered (normally about 3-4 weeks). An educated guess as to price will be in the region of R5-R6k just for the lenses, if you now choose a R2k Oakley frame you can see that this option will set you back close to R10k. The medical aid will only pay a portion of this.
  2. Get the same pair of sunnies (as mentioned in point 1) and have the optom remove the lenses and fit their lenses with a tint on it. This will actually defy the purpose of buying such an expensive pair of sunnies to begin with. As mentioned in point 1, the majority of the R&D goes into the tech of the lenses so effectively you pay R2500 - R3000 just to remove around 90% of the value and put a couple of hundred bucks worth of lenses with a tint on it. The second problem with this scenario (any optom worth their salt will tell you the same thing) is a thing called: Prismatic Disorder. This is where you take a lens and bend it past a base curve of 8 (this is to be able to wrap the lenses to fit the frame). When a prescription lens goes over this level you get a "jump" in the lens when you move your eyes around whilst riding. This will mess you up from a depth perspective and items will also appear to move around. This is a no-no when cycling at speed. 
  3. You can get yourself a cheap pair of sunnies and apply number 2 with them, the same negatives mentioned above applies here as well but it will be more cost effective  :D.
  4.  You can get a new prescription glasses and fit a clip-on to it (you do get quite a few options here)
  5. You could get yourself some photo-chromatic lenses and use the pair for cycling and just about everything else  :D. This will be my option as the medical aid will most probably pay for 80-90% of the costs depending on which scheme you're on. You may have to pay for the lens coating or one or two other things.
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I have a set of Rudi projects with clip ons, nice for a lot of things but not where one sweats a lot in my experience.

 

My local optometrist had my Oakley prescription lenses made, not sure from where, think GP. Frame plus lenses around R4500.

Edited by BSG
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slightly off topic ....

 

reading this thread as somebody that dont need prescription glasses while cycling I notice various tid-bits of information that may well be super handy for the likes of me ....

 

 

I have a cheap pair of plastic glasses that I sometimes use while cycling .... I dont like the feel of glasses while on the bike.  That said, had my second "bug-in-the-eye" situation today ....  so am trying to get my facts sorted ....

 

 

For mountain bike trails - are transition lenses important ?

 

 

YES, I do sweat while cycling ... so this should be considered when choosing glasses.

 

 

 

Junior - which of these manufacturers cater for kids ?

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slightly off topic ....

 

reading this thread as somebody that dont need prescription glasses while cycling I notice various tid-bits of information that may well be super handy for the likes of me ....

 

 

I have a cheap pair of plastic glasses that I sometimes use while cycling .... I dont like the feel of glasses while on the bike. That said, had my second "bug-in-the-eye" situation today .... so am trying to get my facts sorted ....

 

 

For mountain bike trails - are transition lenses important ?

 

 

YES, I do sweat while cycling ... so this should be considered when choosing glasses.

 

 

 

Junior - which of these manufacturers cater for kids ?

I saw the optician on Friday and spoke to her about the transition lense. She advised that she has had a few people complain about the speed in which they change being to slow. Oakley make a lense called Prism that is meant to work better than the transition lense and has got good feedback from MTB riders.

 

I have not ridden with either but decided to go for the Prism.

Edited by Markellis
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I saw the optician on Friday and spoke to her about the transition lense. She advised that she has had a few people complain about the speed in which they change being to slow. Oakley make a lense called Prism that is meant to work better than the transition lense and has got good feedback from MTB riders.

 

I have not ridden with either but decided to go for the Prism.

 

I don't get the issue people have... 

 

They are not supposed to instantly change as you go into the shade, and normal sunglasses will be even worse (by not changing at all). The alternative is a person with normal sight or contact lenses that takes off their glasses when they go into shade (which means taking the hands off the bars, tucking it into helmet or onto shirt etc.)... this is not going to happen fast either so... Why do people expect instant changing? 

 

For me the point is I can go riding at 5am or on a cloudy day and still works when it gets sunny too.

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For mountain bike trails - are transition lenses important ?

 

I personally don't use transition lenses for MTB although I do use them for road. I've got a pair of Oakleys with the Prizm Trail lenses in that I use for MTB and I find them to be much better.

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Have done the contacts +Rydons - Works well if you don't mind contacts. 

 

Currently just have prescription oakleys. They awesome except when you go through a Forrest and can't see anything.  

 

Photochromic > Tint but Prescription > Contacts

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I recently came across this:

Orthokeratology (ortho-k) is the fitting of specially designed gas permeable contact lenses that you wear overnight. While you are asleep, the lenses gently reshape the front surface of your eye (cornea) so you can see clearly the following day after you remove the lenses when you wake up.

 

link

 

Have not used it myself, but looks like a great option for mountain bikers.

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You do have a couple of options here: 

  • You could go to an optometrist and do one of a few things: 
  1. You can get yourself a cheap pair of sunnies and apply number 2 with them, the same negatives mentioned above applies here as well but it will be more cost effective  :D.
  2. You could get yourself some photo-chromatic lenses and use the pair for cycling and just about everything else  :D. This will be my option as the medical aid will most probably pay for 80-90% of the costs depending on which scheme you're on. You may have to pay for the lens coating or one or two other things.

 

 

I have both of the above. Sunglasses with (distance only) prescription lenses and a pair of varifocal glasses with photo-chromatic lenses.

 

But I am scared to wear either for cycling. They both have "plastic" lenses, but I am not sure how safe they would be in a crash? Are "proper" cycling glasses lenses stronger/safer than standard prescription lenses?

 

My wife had a fall while wearing her prescription glasses. The plastic lenses broke and cut her eyebrow - which had to get stitched up by a plastic surgeon. Things could have been much worse if her eye was wounded. Since then I stopped wearing "normal" lenses while cycling.

Edited by i24
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Glasses are like saddles, not all solutions work for all people. Unfortunately due to my prescription I do not have another option but wearing specs.

 

I have for the past couple of years been using the Adidas Evil Eye with the Adidas insert. There were three different inserts for Adidas the last time I checked. I found A731 to be he insert that worked best for me.

 

The people from Adidas are also super helpful, compared to the likes at ASG. And I have purchased a couple of extra sets of lenses. If I know it is going to be a ride with little to no shade, I have lenses specific to more bright conditions or when unsure, I use the LST Active lenses which does not cause any issue when transitioning between sun and shade. Happily have used them on the Sani (and similar forest conditions) more than once and never have had issues with not seeing the trail, rocks, trees and or other cyclists clearly.

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