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I think I've lost my marbles... I've got a bee in my bonnet to do this event... next year. Here's my question to those who have done it:

Am I wasting my time, bearing in mind I had a shoulder op 6 weeks ago? 

I haven't been near a pool in 2 years and normally swim like a brick, but I'm willing to go for lessons (T.I)? I can probably only start swimming mid Nov.

No need to be gentle with your comments, I need the cold hard truth.

 

PS! I do have an Adv racing backround, so afkak does worry me tooooo much!!!
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Well, if you can go for the TI course it will help you a great deal.  I couldn't swim at all last year October and did the TI course.  And I was ready for IM 2006.  If you buy the Runners world edition of this month you will receive a IM info guide as well as a 12 week program. <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 

Remember IM is 80% mental training and 20% physical training and of course you must a very good eating plan!

 

Do NOT over train.  Plan to Race and Race your plan is the secret!!!

 

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Hi There

 

Neve done an I.M. myself but definately plan to someday.  Did a lot of triathlons while at school but am focusing on the cycling at the moment.

 

As far as my experience goes the swimming is the easiest part as it takes the shortest time to complete and if you aren't going for the win the whole aim would be just to get through that leg in one piece.  (and not at the bottom of the sea!!)

 

One thing I have found is that swimming ability does improve quite quickly, once you get into the pool.

 

The adventure racing background should definately help as you are probably used to racing for hours/days on end and you should be strong upstairs!

 

Have you ever run a marathon??

 

Other than that good luck

 
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is there like a duoathlon where you swim and cycle or any event like that where you dont hav to run?? Stupid question but i would like to know.

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Thanks Madelein & le Tour, that's really good news. Yea, I got the new runners world, that's where part of the crazy idea came from... the rest is from a friend that's been on my case... since forever.

 

Madeleine: I'm defintely going to do the TI course as I've only heard good things about it.

Le Tour: Never done a full marathon, couple of halves but plenty of AR hiking at that distance. The way I figure it, if I do a fairly solid swim, a good bike (my strongest leg), I could pretty much walk half of the marathon and still make the cutoff? 
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Even for a brick the swim is the easy part, progress in swimming is quite quick and a wetsuit on the day makes the swim much easier. Dont panic to much about the swim.

The race / event only starts once you begin the marathon and this is what you have to be prepared for.

Get used to eating and "relaxing" on the bike, save the mental stength part for the big run / walk.

 

 
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All good comments.

 

I would add that you have to have time in your life to get sufficient training done.

 

I actually found the bike the hardest part but it was a very hilly course.

 

You can learn to swim pretty fast, as the others have said and finding a good swim club to train with is a good idea

 

Go fo it..
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The good news is you can wear a wetsuit,which will make it easier,do the TI course and then swim as often as you can build up to the distance in intervals start with 100s then progress to 400 take rests in between the sets as you improve shorten the rests.Good luck

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Having done it twice I have to agree that the swim is the easy part. Swimming is 90% tecnique and 10% effort. TI did wonders for my swimming. The bike is for me the toughest part. I did 70% of my training on the bike. This was according to a very structured and expensive training plan. It makes sense because you do most of your endurance work on the bike, much easier to recover from a 6 hour bike ride than a 2 hour run. The longest run I did was 30km.

It is crucially important on the day to have a eating and drinking plan and to stick to it.
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There is no need to do a marathon prior to the race.  I have a lot of probelms with my knees.  So I did a 10km on weekends and the last month of training I only did 1 X 21.1 km a week for training. Lucky for me I have a good running background.  So, my first ever marathon was on the day of the Ironman this year. 

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There is no need to do a marathon prior to the race.  I have a lot of probelms with my knees.  So I did a 10km on weekends and the last month of training I only did 1 X 21.1 km a week for training. Lucky for me I have a good running background.  So' date=' my first ever marathon was on the day of the Ironman this year. [/quote']

 

Yep - sometimes a little less is better than to much - Rather be undertrained than overtrainedWink
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Been there done it, and ya, also haven't done a marathon prior, longest run was Keloggs Striders 32km 5 weeks out, 160km bike 4 weeks out and 3.2 km swim 3 weeks out. And from each of those I tapered down to IM. Last week did bsically training that would rather suit a sprint triathlon just to keep the muscles loose.

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"Don't worry about the swim !!!!!!!"

 

I don not think so, you have to swim before you can get on the bikeErmm You need to be able to swim 4 km. And the 4 km is not in a poolDead So you have to be used, to swimming in open water.

 

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Thanks for all the advice... it's a long shot, but I'm gonna give it a bash. Will keep you up to date on the suffering.

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Some more advice:

1. Set a realistic goal. i.e just finish or 13 hours.

2. Tell your family what is involved, they will see a lot less of you and when they see you, you will be tired.

3. Consistency is the key to all training, don't skip a day because you don't feel like it.

4. If you decide to do it, commit 100%

 

All said, it is an awesome event. The spectators, the venue and the orginisation. They really go out of their way to make everybody feel special.

To finish the race ranks right up there with the most memorable moments in my life.  
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Some more advice:

1. Set a realistic goal. i.e just finish or 13 hours.

2. Tell your family what is involved, they will see a lot less of you and when they see you, you will be tired.

3. Consistency is the key to all training, don't skip a day because you don't feel like it.

4. If you decide to do it, commit 100%

 

All said, it is an awesome event. The spectators, the venue and the orginisation. They really go out of their way to make everybody feel special.

To finish the race ranks right up there with the most memorable moments in my life.  
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