Jump to content

70.3 & Full Ironman Training Programs


Gunston
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

 

I've been looking around for a good structured training program that can take me to 70.3 and then on to Ironman in April. I've scoured the internet and found several vastly different programs making me wonder about their relevance. Without much luck there - I contacted one or two tri-coaches but they all seem to be quite expensive and I as far as virtual coaches go, I cant help but wonder if they dont just give everybody the same generic programs they pulled of the web themselves.

 

So here's my questions - what training program do you follow? Where did you get it? Any advise on reputable coaches that wont break the bank?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gunston

 

The monthly Triathlon magazines have training programs in them. You can also go to exclusive books as they have various beginner guides.

 

In principle however I can maybe suggest that you do all the 100km bike races in November and also target a marathon somewhere along the line.

 

There are also 3 other 70.3's that I know of in the months Dec to March. (Prestige Ultra / Buffelspoort / Midmar) They should be good prep.

 

Anyways, training is very experimental. It differs for each person. I am now in year 6 of triathlon and still testing different approaches.

 

One tip however is to make sure you focus on the running as it is the toughest of the 3 disciplines

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Garfield offers some good solid advice but if you really want to go the route of a more structured approach that a coach or training program gives, then look at the option of purchasing a program from Training Peaks (www.trainingpeaks.com) or contact Claire Horner at MyTraining Day (www.mytrainingday.com).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Garfield offers some good solid advice but if you really want to go the route of a more structured approach that a coach or training program gives, then look at the option of purchasing a program from Training Peaks (www.trainingpeaks.com) or contact Claire Horner at MyTraining Day (www.mytrainingday.com).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used one from www.beginnertriathlete.com - free, which worked for me, but they are not very specific. You can upgrade your account and get tailored programmes

 

Apparently the Don Fink programs are pretty good too, but you'll have to get his book then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gunston

 

The monthly Triathlon magazines have training programs in them. You can also go to exclusive books as they have various beginner guides.

 

In principle however I can maybe suggest that you do all the 100km bike races in November and also target a marathon somewhere along the line.

 

There are also 3 other 70.3's that I know of in the months Dec to March. (Prestige Ultra / Buffelspoort / Midmar) They should be good prep.

 

Anyways, training is very experimental. It differs for each person. I am now in year 6 of triathlon and still testing different approaches.

 

One tip however is to make sure you focus on the running as it is the toughest of the 3 disciplines

 

dont forget about Jailbreak :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used one from www.beginnertriathlete.com - free, which worked for me, but they are not very specific. You can upgrade your account and get tailored programmes

 

Apparently the Don Fink programs are pretty good too, but you'll have to get his book then.

+1 on beginnertiathlete.Have used it for both 1/2 and full. :clap: :clap: :clap:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A bit late on the reply but a big +1 for Don Fink. I know several people who have successfully completed IM on his programs. PM me your email address and I will send you a copy of his competitive programme that I put into Excel. If it seems a bit much then you can tone it down a little bit to suit your needs.

 

FYI - the Don Fink book "Iron Fit" has three programs called "just get around", "intermediate" and "competitive" based around how much time you have for training. There is quite a lot of volume in the competitive program but the five people I know who have used it have all gone sub 11 so I know it works. I am going to be using it this year myself having used the intermediate and private coaching before.

 

One thing to note is that the programs have quite a high running volume so if you are injury prone it might be worth substituting one of the runs for some sort of cross training session. Maybe rowing or circuits or something.

 

Also I would highly recommend buying the book. It is a good read and a great introduction to Ironman training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

would you mind sending me the IM training plan.. justinfraenkel@gmail.com

 

 

A bit late on the reply but a big +1 for Don Fink. I know several people who have successfully completed IM on his programs. PM me your email address and I will send you a copy of his competitive programme that I put into Excel. If it seems a bit much then you can tone it down a little bit to suit your needs.

 

FYI - the Don Fink book "Iron Fit" has three programs called "just get around", "intermediate" and "competitive" based around how much time you have for training. There is quite a lot of volume in the competitive program but the five people I know who have used it have all gone sub 11 so I know it works. I am going to be using it this year myself having used the intermediate and private coaching before.

 

One thing to note is that the programs have quite a high running volume so if you are injury prone it might be worth substituting one of the runs for some sort of cross training session. Maybe rowing or circuits or something.

 

Also I would highly recommend buying the book. It is a good read and a great introduction to Ironman training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Generic programmes. Yep thats a big concern. But it also applies to programmes from Fink, Friel et al. What happens if you miss a week, what happens when you just don't seem to be progressing, how does it take into account the fact that people adjust to training at different rates.

 

A programme from a coach should in the first instance be periodised for you, the questions that have to be asked would include; 1) What volume of training currently are you doing in each disapline and how is it made up, 2) What is your goal race and your goals for that race, 3) how much time can you afford to put into your training and how is this made up, 4) Your current health and state of any current and or recent injuries; 4) Age 5) Support structures 6) Equipment and facilities that are available, it goes on...

 

Only when a coach has that can they begin to consider things like, rate of build, length in respective period of training, ie base, base transition etc, what micro structure to use eg 2 week on 1 week off, 4 week s on 1 week off, what percentage of endurance, threshold, v02 and speed work is required.

 

Once that is done the coach can then begin to design sessions that fit in with the athletes abilities, requirements and goals, if that is done then it is in no ways a generic programme if not well then its not a programme!

 

Cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

My Profile My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Settings Help Logout