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Cape Epic training


Newboy
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I have been fortunate enough to get a Epic entry.

Some background:

I have been cycling for many years, I have done 4 Sani2C races with my Epic partner and we ride very well together.

I am riding currently but not a lot. I run or go to gym 6 days a week.

I have trained for and completed IM twice so I know how to put in many hours a week.

 

My question is this:

1. how much training a week for Epic?

2. When do I hit peak training?

3. Should I invest (paid for plan) in a training plan specific for Epic?

 

Thanks

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Done 3. Peak training in Feb. No more than 16hrs/week. Run 3 times /week for about 4km. Do some weight training on arms and shoulders and you will be ok. A few fast road races end feb and early march will keep you sharp. Sort the supplements you will use out now . Its important to keep your stomach healthy.

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I have been fortunate enough to get a Epic entry.

Some background:

I have been cycling for many years, I have done 4 Sani2C races with my Epic partner and we ride very well together.

I am riding currently but not a lot. I run or go to gym 6 days a week.

I have trained for and completed IM twice so I know how to put in many hours a week.

 

My question is this:

1. how much training a week for Epic?

2. When do I hit peak training?

3. Should I invest (paid for plan) in a training plan specific for Epic?

 

Thanks

 

All depends on what your goals are, do you want to race and finish in the top 100. 200. 300 or just finish comfortably?

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All depends on what your goals are, do you want to race and finish in the top 100. 200. 300 or just finish comfortably?

 

Important bit I missed. I just want to finish comfortably.

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Done it in 2010 and came 118GC. Doing it again next year and I think Spark has got it right. Take a week off in December sometime to recover. It is also about being in the right mind for it. No need for a trainer but I have just hooked up a Dietician as I need to drop a few kgs. Good luck and see you there. If you come to CT before the race bring your bike and would be happy to join you for a training ride.

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One thing about next years Epic, is that they are making it tougher... Heard talk about the stage to Oak Valley over Groenland can have as much as 3000m climbing in the first 50-100km and that the last day into Lourensford will take a detour over some of the hills in Schapenberg - just to make life interesting!

 

Therefore now is the time for lots of base / endurance training.

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My question is this:

1. how much training a week for Epic?

2. When do I hit peak training?

3. Should I invest (paid for plan) in a training plan specific for Epic?

 

Thanks

 

We did 15 hours a week coming from no prior stage race experience, and we finished with no major issues in the middle of the field (even though we got a few technicals, upset tummies, a cold etc). If you wanna be in top 100 or so, I guess you will need to up to at least 20 hours. We hit our peak in February and then just maintained. Don't think it's necessary for a training plan. Put in the hours and you'll be fine. Just remember it is a tough race, no matter how hard you've trained. Fear it! It will make you train harder!

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banna it's not about quantity but quality ;)

 

I have ridden three epics, the last two I finished 101 and then 73. I did not do more than a 12 hour week for either of them. I think somewhere further back someone said ride lots on consecutive days and I think that is a big thing. 2 hours every day, with some variety on pace (some easy some hard hill intervals) is key.

 

I'd not do more than 12 hours a week, and then do one or two big weeks where on the weekend you do two 4 to 5 hours back to back rides. I hear people doing 20 hour weeks and it is really not needed, it just tired you out and will make you mentally exhausted before you get off the startline!

 

my 2 cents.

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banna it's not about quantity but quality ;)

 

 

Ja I agree, but surely it also depends from what base you're coming off? If you're a doppie like me, who before the Epic only did a Knysna 50km race as a longest race ever, the training must differ from guys who's been riding stage races and marathon events for years?

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Banna, I think you are right, it does make a huge difference.

 

I race and train pretty hard all year through so I don't do much different for the epic :)

 

I just see so many people who overtrain for the epic. I would rather start earlier and build up a good base rather than hammer the last three months at 20 hours a week.

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I have done a few. Just ride a lot till December (aim for 12-14 hours/week). Do a shorter stage in December like the Sabie Experience WITH YOUR PARTNER.

Finish comfortably? What does it mean? Top 100? Top 400? Make sure your partner has the same goal.

Don't do more than 12-14 hours a week, even in February. Rather go for quality.

Read what brussel said.

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I just see so many people who overtrain for the epic. I would rather start earlier and build up a good base rather than hammer the last three months at 20 hours a week.

 

You're right. We trained for about 6 months and I must say by the end I was really gatvol! The one day I rode with Brian Strauss (who's come in the top 30 a few times I think) and he also said that it's not necessary to do these 7 hour training rides. Rather try to split it up in say 6 rides of 2 - 3 hours. It basically echoes what you said. But again, Brian has been riding for years, so he doesn't really need to train specifically for the epic.

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You're right. We trained for about 6 months and I must say by the end I was really gatvol! The one day I rode with Brian Strauss (who's come in the top 30 a few times I think) and he also said that it's not necessary to do these 7 hour training rides. Rather try to split it up in say 6 rides of 2 - 3 hours. It basically echoes what you said. But again, Brian has been riding for years, so he doesn't really need to train specifically for the epic.

 

heck 7 hour rides :blink:

The longest ride I did over the three years of training was 5:30, most of the time our long rides where 4-5 hours once a week. The rest 90 to 180 minutes long

 

I also get to points where I look at my bike, feel nauseous and walk back to the couch :blush:

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heck 7 hour rides :blink:

The longest ride I did over the three years of training was 5:30, most of the time our long rides where 4-5 hours once a week. The rest 90 to 180 minutes long

 

I also get to points where I look at my bike, feel nauseous and walk back to the couch :blush:

 

Ha ha! Ja, it took me about 3 months after the Epic to get back onto my bike. But ja, nothing like Jonkershoek singletrack to get you back into the swing of things!

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Dont forget to ride hard while you are training,do LT intervals, dont hold back and train at a subdued heart rate......quality over quantity.

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