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New Zealand - The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.


Wayne Potgieter
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Excellent points.

 

There is a legacy effect for SAFFAS to want good schools.

 

I admit I have a huge amount of bias and judgement here (for which I am not proud) but to me a lower decile rating means a "poorer" community and this reflects more on the standard and type of the community rather than the schooling effectiveness. I want my kids to grow up in an area that they have some degree of cultural and economic similarity to those around them. I don't want them to be "wealthy" kids in a poor area or poor kids in a wealthy school. I am trying to find something that matches their socio economic status.

 

I realise I am part of the problem and not part of the solution and like I said, am not proud of this viewpoint as it smells "elitist" but it is what it is....

 

There is nothing wrong with wanting the best for your kids, and it is your prerogative to make those decisions as you see fit!

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I won't care about the decile of my little ones school, not from a teaching focus at all. Low decile schools have great teachers and they tend to go on more courses keeping up with things more regularly. I'll be more concerned about the influences and examples of the children that's in school with my little one. So bad behaviour from a non respectful way can be at decile 1 and 10 schools (the latter just because they are brats). Typically the middle class are seen as hard workers, but also still with respect because their parents keep them to rules etc.

 

But then again, you'd find bad and good where ever you go.

 

On the money. My Mrs worries about the kids from dodgy backgrounds, and it is a matter for concern as we have a number who you can see are and will be bad influences (arrive late, are antisocial/unpleasant/aggressive). But that's life, too, you get all kinds of people and have to get used to dealing with the good and bad.

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I can't speak for anywhere else, but the schools on the north shore are a real mix, I reckon a lot more immigrant than Kiwi kids.

 

I wouldn't mind moving a bit out of town to get my kids into a more homogenous 'Kiwi' school where there is a real sense of community and every one knows everyone's business.

 

Not gonna happen tho, and maybe immigrant kids will find more in common with immigrant kids.

 

Told ya you should come on down to Whakatown. Lekker in the wop wops.

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A few years ago when myself and 2 buddies did an epic dirtbike rally-adventure through Central Otago, we came across a number of "School Bus Stop" road signs, in the middle of some amazing back country.

 

I remember thinking to myself that those kids, growing up on farms around there, probably have a pretty awesome life. Sure they won't have all the modern conveniences found at Westfield Newmarket or Albany. But they're probably less concerned about having the latest iPhone and more concerned about the outdoor activities they participate in. (a generalisation I know).

 

Either way, I thought it was cool that even out in the wops, there were schools and transport for the kids.

 

Speaking of dirt bikes...these kids will grow up to be the next Jarvis, Haaker or Birch ;-)

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I can't speak for anywhere else, but the schools on the north shore are a real mix, I reckon a lot more immigrant than Kiwi kids.

 

I wouldn't mind moving a bit out of town to get my kids into a more homogenous 'Kiwi' school where there is a real sense of community and every one knows everyone's business.

 

Not gonna happen tho, and maybe immigrant kids will find more in common with immigrant kids.

 

Depends on their age, I guess. My kids are born Kiwis, my 7 year old tells me he is a New Zealander and I am a South African. Bloody xenophobe!!

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Speaking of dirt bikes...these kids will grow up to be the next Jarvis, Haaker or Birch ;-)

 

You know it!

 

Even just in my last visit to the Queenstown, I saw loads of local MTB kids all over. I'm talking probably 12 - 16yr olds, cruising through town after coming down off the trails, to park up outside the KFC and grab some lunch.

 

Chances are 90% of them would smoke most of us on those trails. What a great way to grow up!

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. I'm talking probably 12 - 16yr olds, cruising through town after coming down off the trails, to park up outside the KFC and grab some lunch.

 

Chances are 90% of them would smoke most of us on those trails. What a great way to grow up!

This was the biggest reason for me moving to NZ.

 

So my kids can live an independent life and enjoy themselves.

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On the good, bad and ugly theme, the bad thing about being on the upside-down part of the world is that gravity sucks just as hard here as anywhere else.

 

OTB'ed last Saturday on a drop-off in a local park (constructed by the local feral dirt-jumper and enduro-bro teen wolfpack). Did a right proper job of it, 4 compression fractures of the upper vertebrae, 3 chipped teeth, 2 broken ribs and a partridge in a pear tree. Helmet pics in the other current thread.

 

4 days in hospital, nice individual room in the nearest private hospital. And now back in lockdown mode as in working from home again for the next 6 weeks or so. The Docs do want me to work to the best of my tolerance to speed up the healing process, but recommend lots of position changes, small breaks, stretches etc, which don't work so well in the office environment.

 

In a few weeks it will be time to think about what I need to do to fix up the bike, my new XTR shifter has  shattered, dropper no longer works and I don't yet have the strength to muck around with the RD which is in a weird position entangled with a dropped chain. Fun, fun, fun.

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On the good, bad and ugly theme, the bad thing about being on the upside-down part of the world is that gravity sucks just as hard here as anywhere else.

 

OTB'ed last Saturday on a drop-off in a local park (constructed by the local feral dirt-jumper and enduro-bro teen wolfpack). Did a right proper job of it, 4 compression fractures of the upper vertebrae, 3 chipped teeth, 2 broken ribs and a partridge in a pear tree. Helmet pics in the other current thread.

 

4 days in hospital, nice individual room in the nearest private hospital. And now back in lockdown mode as in working from home again for the next 6 weeks or so. The Docs do want me to work to the best of my tolerance to speed up the healing process, but recommend lots of position changes, small breaks, stretches etc, which don't work so well in the office environment.

 

In a few weeks it will be time to think about what I need to do to fix up the bike, my new XTR shifter has shattered, dropper no longer works and I don't yet have the strength to muck around with the RD which is in a weird position entangled with a dropped chain. Fun, fun, fun.

Sounds bad and the pics of the helmet look bad.

 

I’ve had too many friends in the last year have falls involving back injuries. One is partially paralysed as a result and two others are looking at a minimum of 12 weeks off the bike before being allowed to start on an indoor bike. I hope you have a speedy and full recovery.

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Sounds bad and the pics of the helmet look bad.

 

I’ve had too many friends in the last year have falls involving back injuries. One is partially paralysed as a result and two others are looking at a minimum of 12 weeks off the bike before being allowed to start on an indoor bike. I hope you have a speedy and full recovery.

 

Thanks RossW. For most of the first day I was under neck and spine precautions, dropped the next day to spine precautions only, dropped fully after X-rays confirmed the fractures were stable. Nothing like being trussed up unable to move to make you appreciate what you do have.

 

Will be doing more CT scans in 2 weeks and follow up visits, but I am guessing to most likely to be off for 8 weeks, and start off gradually.

 

On the plus side, after having my vitals checked every hour I now know I have great blood pressure stats and a resting heart rate that is phenomenally low given that I am no pro-athlete! 

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Thanks RossW. For most of the first day I was under neck and spine precautions, dropped the next day to spine precautions only, dropped fully after X-rays confirmed the fractures were stable. Nothing like being trussed up unable to move to make you appreciate what you do have.

 

Will be doing more CT scans in 2 weeks and follow up visits, but I am guessing to most likely to be off for 8 weeks, and start off gradually.

 

On the plus side, after having my vitals checked every hour I now know I have great blood pressure stats and a resting heart rate that is phenomenally low given that I am no pro-athlete! 

I crushed a few vertebrae in an accident around 40 years ago and the doc told me I'd never ride a dirt bike again. Well I rode in my body cast; stupid I know.  Bottom line though he also gave me a set of exercises I still - mainly stretching. Since then I rode enduros and dirt bikes, hiked with a backpack and MTB aplenty. Some pain and panic at first but very little trouble since then; still exercise and Pilates, watch my weight.

 

You'll be good!!

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On the good, bad and ugly theme, the bad thing about being on the upside-down part of the world is that gravity sucks just as hard here as anywhere else.

 

OTB'ed last Saturday on a drop-off in a local park (constructed by the local feral dirt-jumper and enduro-bro teen wolfpack). Did a right proper job of it, 4 compression fractures of the upper vertebrae, 3 chipped teeth, 2 broken ribs and a partridge in a pear tree. Helmet pics in the other current thread.

 

4 days in hospital, nice individual room in the nearest private hospital. And now back in lockdown mode as in working from home again for the next 6 weeks or so. The Docs do want me to work to the best of my tolerance to speed up the healing process, but recommend lots of position changes, small breaks, stretches etc, which don't work so well in the office environment.

 

In a few weeks it will be time to think about what I need to do to fix up the bike, my new XTR shifter has  shattered, dropper no longer works and I don't yet have the strength to muck around with the RD which is in a weird position entangled with a dropped chain. Fun, fun, fun.

So sorry to hear, but glad you are well enough to display a great attitude here :thumbup: Heal well and fast.

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On the good, bad and ugly theme, the bad thing about being on the upside-down part of the world is that gravity sucks just as hard here as anywhere else.

 

OTB'ed last Saturday on a drop-off in a local park (constructed by the local feral dirt-jumper and enduro-bro teen wolfpack). Did a right proper job of it, 4 compression fractures of the upper vertebrae, 3 chipped teeth, 2 broken ribs and a partridge in a pear tree. Helmet pics in the other current thread.

 

4 days in hospital, nice individual room in the nearest private hospital. And now back in lockdown mode as in working from home again for the next 6 weeks or so. The Docs do want me to work to the best of my tolerance to speed up the healing process, but recommend lots of position changes, small breaks, stretches etc, which don't work so well in the office environment.

 

In a few weeks it will be time to think about what I need to do to fix up the bike, my new XTR shifter has  shattered, dropper no longer works and I don't yet have the strength to muck around with the RD which is in a weird position entangled with a dropped chain. Fun, fun, fun.

 

As they say in the old country... "Eina!".

 

Sorry to hear Patham. Hope you heal up quick and proper!

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On the good, bad and ugly theme, the bad thing about being on the upside-down part of the world is that gravity sucks just as hard here as anywhere else.

 

OTB'ed last Saturday on a drop-off in a local park (constructed by the local feral dirt-jumper and enduro-bro teen wolfpack). Did a right proper job of it, 4 compression fractures of the upper vertebrae, 3 chipped teeth, 2 broken ribs and a partridge in a pear tree. Helmet pics in the other current thread.

 

4 days in hospital, nice individual room in the nearest private hospital. And now back in lockdown mode as in working from home again for the next 6 weeks or so. The Docs do want me to work to the best of my tolerance to speed up the healing process, but recommend lots of position changes, small breaks, stretches etc, which don't work so well in the office environment.

 

In a few weeks it will be time to think about what I need to do to fix up the bike, my new XTR shifter has  shattered, dropper no longer works and I don't yet have the strength to muck around with the RD which is in a weird position entangled with a dropped chain. Fun, fun, fun.

 

So sorry to hear and I hope for a speedy recovery with no lagging issues.

 

I "liked" your post simply because you dedicated more words to your broken shifter than your broken vertebrae. This means you get to keep your "man card" and are in fact upgraded to the Nick Offerman version.

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