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  1. Hello everyone! I am extremely new to the MTB scene and have acquired a pre-owned Rocky Mountain Element 930 (2012) as my starter bike. I took it for a full service and they managed to get everything in top shape except for the ABC bushings on the rear shock (no stock). Can anyone point me to someone who can source these ABC bushings for me? Techie says I have about 6 months or so before needing to replace. Thanks in advance!
  2. InstinctIntended use: Trail Wheel size: 29" (27.5+ ready) Front travel: 140mm Rear travel: 140mm Stable and aggressive, the Instinct is our most versatile trail bike. With 29" wheels and a wide range of RIDE-9™ adjustments, the all new Instinct is available in both carbon and alloy models. An all-new frame for 2018 pushes the rear travel to 140mm, increasing stiffness and tweaking the suspension kinematics. Despite the increase in travel, the new frame has noticeably more efficient pedaling, with better small bump sensitivity and a host of next-generation features. Instinct BC EditionIntended use: Aggressive trail Wheel size: 29" (27.5+ ready) Front travel: 160mm Rear travel: 155mm Born in BC, we’ve turned the Instinct BC Edition into an aggressive trail monster. Designed with an optimized link and long stroke shock that provide155mm of rear travel and ultra-aggressive geometry, we’ve kitted out the Instinct BC Edition with wide bars, big tires, ultra-stiff wheels, and more capable suspension. It smashes all mountain lines, rails corners, and plows over everything in sight, while displaying all the climbing efficiency that makes the Instinct a crowd favourite. I can't believe how much fun I've had riding the new Instinct. I was blown away by how effortlessly the bike carries speed, while improvements to the geometry and stiffness keep it nimble and stable. The Instinct has handled every type of terrain I've thrown at it and even opened up new lines for me on trails I've been riding for over a decade. Thomas Vanderham Improved suspension performance We’ve increased overall progression and support at sag, while making small bump performance even more sensitive. Higher anti-squat values dramatically improve pedaling efficiency. Next generation features Comprehensive evolutionary updates across the platform include features like tooled axles, single-sided bearing pivots, integrated “spirit guide” chainguide, boost spacing, and metric shock compatibility. Updated RIDE-9 Our RIDE-9 system provides a wide range of geometry and suspension adjustability; it has been moved into the link for lighter, narrower packaging. Instinct BC Edition, with its increased travel, comes with a single mounting position in its link to provide the best balance of travel and geometry. Progressive geometry To add control and descending capability, we’ve increased reach, slackened the headtube angle, and lowered the bottom bracket. We’ve retained short chainstays to keep the bike agile, and used a moderately steep seat tube for efficient climbing performance. Technical Details:Increased anti-squat for better pedaling efficiency 29” Wide Trail and 27.5+ compatible Max tire clearance is 29 x 2.6, and 27.5 x 2.8 (3.0 with low profile knobs) Bearings at all pivots, including at lower shock mount (compatible with aftermarket shocks as well) Blind pivots maximize heel clearance Lighter, tooled rear axle All Instinct models include the FSA extend-O-matic headset. The bike ships with a second (taller) headset bottom cup, which allows the rider to opt for 27.5+ wheels without negatively affecting handling, and no fork swap is required. Improved cable management: large headtube ports, full shift housing, large downtube access port, and internal shift and brake housing within the front triangle Future-proofed to be compatible with Di2, Fox Live, and a dropper post simultaneously Seat-tube lengths have been adjusted to accommodate longer dropper posts at maximum insertion. Chainstay and downtube protectors. *Due to production delays, the initial shipment of 2018 Instincts will not include chainstay and downtube protectors. They will be shipped to shops as soon as they’re available. The October shipment will have them installed. Integrated “Spirit Guide” chainguide, with 2-bolt ISCG05 BC Edition features a dedicated link delivering 155mm of travel and fixed geometry 1x optimized design with wider main pivot Lower standover height Significantly stiffer thanks to a one-piece seat stay, new envelope, and updated layup (47.7% more lateral stiffness) Modern parts compatibility (boost spacing, metric shock lengths, post-mount 180mm brakes, etc.) All sizes fit a water bottle in the front triangle, even with a reservoir shock Sizes: S-XL Weight: Frame & shock: 5.09lb (2310g), size Medium Frame & shock: 5.62lb (2550g), size Medium, Instinct BC Ed. Protectors, chainguide, & axle: 0.57lb (260g) Instinct Carbon 70 complete: 27.4lb (12.4kg), size Medium Instinct Carbon 90 BC Edition complete: 29.5lb (13.4kg), size Medium PipelineIntended use: Aggressive trail Wheel size: 27.5+ (29" ready) Front travel: 140mm Rear travel: 140mm The all-new Pipeline combines the confidence of plus-sized tires in raw, technical terrain with an aggressive trail chassis. An all-new 2018 Pipeline frame pushes the rear travel to 140mm, increases stiffness, adjusts the suspension kinematics for more efficient pedaling and better small bump sensitivity, and gives the frame a host of next-generation features. Available in both carbon and alloy models, the Pipeline plows through greasy roots and square-edged chunder with authority, while providing near limitless traction on rocky, slippery climbs. With its plus tires, the Pipeline lets my imagination run wild with what is possible on the trails. It allows me to do all of the crazy things that I can think of. Jesse Melamed Improved suspension performance We’ve increased overall progression and support at sag, while making small bump performance even more sensitive. Higher anti-squat values dramatically improve pedaling efficiency. Next generation features Comprehensive evolutionary updates across the platform include features like tooled axles, single-sided bearing pivots, integrated “spirit guide” chainguide, boost spacing, and metric shock compatibility. Updated RIDE-9 Our RIDE-9 system provides a wide range of geometry and suspension adjustability; it has been moved into the link for lighter, narrower packaging. Progressive geometry To add control and descending capability, we’ve increased reach, slackened the headtube angle, and lowered the bottom bracket. We’ve significantly shortened the chainstays to improve agility and used a moderately steep seat tube for efficient climbing performance. Technical Details:Increased anti-squat for better pedaling efficiency 27.5+ and 29” Wide Trail compatible Max tire clearance is 27.5 x 2.8 (3.0 with low profile knobs), and 29 x 2.6 Bearings at all pivots, including at lower shock mount (compatible with aftermarket shocks as well) Blind pivots maximize heel clearance Lighter, tooled rear axle All Pipeline models include the FSA extend-O-matic headset. The bike ships with a second (shorter) headset bottom cup, which allows the rider to opt for 29" wheels without negatively affecting handling, and no fork swap is required. Improved cable management: large headtube ports, full shift housing, large downtube access port, and internal shift and brake housing within the front triangle Future-proofed to be compatible with Di2, Fox Live, and a dropper post simultaneously Seat-tube lengths have been adjusted to accommodate longer dropper posts at maximum insertion. Chainstay and downtube protectors. *Due to production delays, the initial shipment of 2018 Pipelines will not include chainstay and downtube protectors. They will be shipped to shops as soon as they’re available. The October shipment will have them installed. Integrated “Spirit Guide” chainguide, with 2-bolt ISCG05 1x optimized design with wider main pivot Lower standover height Significantly stiffer thanks to a one-piece seat stay, new envelope, and updated layup (47.7% more lateral stiffness) Modern parts compatibility (boost spacing, metric shock lengths, post-mount 180mm brakes, etc.) All sizes fit a water bottle in the front triangle, even with a reservoir shock Sizes: S-XL Weight: Frame & shock: 5.09lb (2310g), size Medium Protectors, chainguide, & axle: 0.57lb (260g) Pipeline Carbon 70 complete: 29.1lb (13.2kg), size Medium
  3. It’s an Altitude The Altitude Powerplay has the same geometry and suspension performance as the unassisted Altitude platform. It is the first e-MTB that features true aggressive trail ride feel. Next-generation drive system The Powerplay drive system was designed from the ground up to allow true mountain bike performance, while providing class-leading torque, massive battery capacity, and ultra quiet operation. Intuitive pedal assist An in-line torque sensor provides smooth, instant power response, making for an intuitive, natural ride with no learning curve. Get on and go. Charge fast, then charge hard The 48v system provides super short charge times, taking only two hours to reach 80% capacity of the available 632Wh lithium ion battery. Powerplay Drive system details The Powerplay drive system was born from our desire to push the boundaries of electric assist bikes. We knew from the project’s outset that to design an electric mountain bike to our suspension and geometry standards, we would need to take a fresh approach. A low-mounted motor keeps the centre of gravity low and the entire system compact, while allowing for ultra-short chainstays and a bottom bracket that is integral to the frame. We use a high efficiency, three-phase brushless motor to provide class-leading torque and ultra quiet operation. To get instant power response on trail, we put the torque sensor between the chainring and the drive gear, and our 48v battery voltage allows for super fast charging. Designed by us in Canada, the Powerplay drive system is sleek, lightweight, and powerful. Ultimately, it’s a drive system that allows us to deliver electric mountain bikes that ride like true mountain bikes. High efficiency, three-phase brushless motor provides class-leading torque Instant, natural power response makes for an intuitive ride, thanks to an in-line torque sensor Ultra-quiet drive operation 48v battery voltage for fast-charging and heat management in high-torque scenarios To prevent creaking and wear, pedaling forces are isolated from the drive system via a bottom bracket shell that is integral to the frame itself Increased stiffness thanks to structural motor casing Compact, low-pro le motor design with reinforced motor casing and integrated motor-brace bashguard Display-free with a low-pro le remote for a pure ride experience Bar-mounted remote displays assist level, battery level, and diagnostics; controls three assist levels and “walk” mode Optional eBikeMotion mobile app (iOS & Android) connects via Bluetooth and provides a wide range of system customization, reach estimates, ride tracking, and more Available with a massive 632Wh lithium-ion battery Minimal drag when exceeding the motor speed or when drive system is disengaged thanks to crankset clutch and elimination of traditional e-bike gearbox Based on a third generation electric drive system that's been in development since 2010 Dealer service and parts support in Europe Wear items (BB, drive sprocket) are shop-serviceable with common shop tools Works with standard Race Face bottom bracket and crankset Charge fast, then charge hard ultra-fast charge times of 1 hour 40 minutes (to 80%) with the 500Wh battery, or 2 hours (to 80%) with the 632Wh battery Bike Details:Available full Smoothwall carbon frame Weight:Altitude PowerplayTM Carbon 90, size Medium: 47.6lb (21.6kg) Altitude PowerplayTM Carbon 70, size Medium: 49.2lb (22.3kg) Altitude PowerplayTM Carbon 50, size Medium: 49.1lb (22.3kg) [*]Ride-9 system for a wide range of geometry and suspension adjustments [*]All sizes t a water bottle inside the front triangle [*]Geometry & pivot points identical to the traditional Altitude, with suspension kinematics optimized for additional chain torque [*]Upper idler straightens the chainline for reduced drivetrain wear [*]Integral bottom bracket shell is part of the frame, not the drive system—improving sti ness and preventing creaking or wear [*]Standard PF92 bottom bracket is shop serviceable and easily replaceable [*]Single-sided chainstay and seatstay pivots for a narrower rear triangle—reduces heel rub, even with Boost spacing [*]Enduro MAX cartridge bearing pivots with simplified hardware [*]Shock-eyelet bearings for small-bump sensitivity [*]Designed for 27.5x2.5 Wide Trail tires for precise, aggressive performance; compatible with 26+ tires (26x3.0) [*]Clean and tidy: oversized downtube ports for ease of cable routing, with full-length internal dropper post routing and internal brake routing in the front triangle [*]Lightweight bolt-on axle for reduced hardware complexity and extra security in e-MTB applications [*]Tapered ZS44 | ZS56 headset [*]Post-mount 180 brakes [*]Boost spacing [*]1x specific [*]Metric shock, 210mm x 55mm
  4. For 2018 we've designed an all-new frame to increase stiffness, improve pedaling efficiency and small-bump sensitivity, and include a host of next-generation features. Now available in both carbon and alloy models, the Altitude allows for a wide range of RIDE-9™ adjustments to tackle any terrain—from technical BC loam, to clapped out EWS tracks, flowy New Zealand jumps, and Moab slickrock singletrack. The Altitude has always been my go-to, do-everything bike, from technical climbs here on the North Shore to burly descents in the Italian Alps. This new one improves everything I love about the bike—it’s smoother, stiffer, lower, slacker, quieter, and nails all the little details. Just like this old freerider, the Altitude gets better with age! Wade Simmons https://vimeo.com/214787268Key details: Improved suspension performanceWe’ve increased overall progression and support at sag, while making small-bump performance even more sensitive. Higher anti-squat values dramatically improve pedaling efficiency. Next generation features Comprehensive evolutionary updates across the platform include features like tooled axles, single-sided bearing pivots, integrated “spirit guide” chainguide, boost spacing, and metric shock compatibility. Updated Ride-9™Our Ride-9™ system provides a wide range of geometry and suspension adjustability; it has been moved into the link for lighter, narrower packaging. Progressive geometry To add control and descending capability, we’ve increased reach, slackened the headtube angle, and lowered the bottom bracket. We’ve retained short chainstays to keep the bike agile, and used a moderately steep seattube for efficient climbing performance. Rocky Mountain Altitude Carbon 90 Rocky Mountain Altitude Carbon 70 Technical Details:Increased anti-squat for better pedaling efficiency 27.5” Wide Trail and 26+ compatible Bearings at all pivots, including at lower shock mount (compatible with aftermarket shocks as well) Blind pivots maximize heel clearance Lighter, tooled rear axle Improved cable management: large headtube ports, full shift housing, large downtube access port, and internal shift and brake housing within the front triangle Future-proofed to be compatible with Di2, Fox Live, and a dropper post simultaneously Seat-tube lengths have been adjusted to accommodate longer dropper posts at maximum insertion. Chainstay and downtube protectors. *Due to production delays, the initial shipment of 2018 Altitudes will not include downtube protectors. They will be shipped to shops free of charge as soon as they’re ready. Integrated “Spirit Guide” chainguide, with 2-bolt ISCG05 1x only Lower standover height Significantly stiffer thanks to one-piece seatstay, new envelope, and updated layup (25% more lateral stiffness) Modern parts compatibility (boost spacing, metric shock lengths, post-mount 180mm brakes, etc.) All sizes fit a water bottle in front triangle, even with a reservoir shock Sizes: XS-XL Weight:Frame & shock: 5.45lb (2470g), size Medium Protectors, chainguide, & axle: 0.57lb (260g) Altitude Carbon 90 & Carbon 70 complete: 28.4lb (12.88kg), size Medium [*]Select models and sizes available from May 15th. Regional availability may vary. Rocky Mountain Altitude Carbon 50 Rocky Mountain Altitude Alloy C30 Geometry Naming: In the interest of describing our lineup more clearly, we’ve updated our naming conventions. What used to be called Altitude 790 MSL is now Altitude Carbon 90, and what used to be called Altitude 750 is now Altitude Alloy 50. The Altitude still uses high-quality Smoothwall carbon and FORM alloy frames, and higher spec-numbers still indicate higher end specs. Pricing & Availability Select models and sizes available from May 15th. Regional availability may vary.Altitude Carbon 90: $6999 USD, $8699 CAD Altitude Carbon Frameset: $2749 USD, $3499 CAD Altitude Carbon 70: $5299 USD, $6499 CAD Altitude Carbon 50: $4099 USD, $4999 CAD Altitude Alloy 70: $3999 USD, $4999 CAD Altitude Alloy 50: $3199 USD, $3999 CAD Altitude Alloy 30: $2899 USD, $3699 CAD For all markets outside of North America, please contact the regional Rocky Mountain Distributor.
  5. Hey guys, Here's the deal: I want to know how much you would pay for this 2011 Rocky Mountain Element 30msl. Let's say the condition is very good (see ad pics). Throw a figure out, or provide a range: highest and lowest amount depending on whatever your criteria are. The ad has everything you need to know. 26" lovers and haters are ALL WELCOME. Throw the offer on the ground or press it tightly to your bosom and sing sweet songs of longing. Thanks for your input.
  6. I've crisscrossed the globe as a competitor for many years, but I rarely ventured beyond the mountain resorts that contests are held in. As I get older, I've started pushing to escape the industry bubble and get off the beaten path more. The premise behind Gullyver's Travels is to motivate everyone to step outside of their comfort zone and explore new places. Click here to view the article
  7. Episode One takes place in the French Alps and features long time friend and Rocky Mountain teammate, Tito Tomasi. A world traveller who also happens to be a phenomenal mountain biker, Tito has ridden some of the most remote places on earth. His personal motto is vive la vie, and we intended to do just that. Our mission began in the village of Abriès. We pedalled as long as we could, before the grade forced us to dismount and carry our bikes. We reached the Malrif Lakes, which sit at about 8,000 feet, and set up camp for the evening. Just before the sun dropped we got a fire going and filled our stomachs with beer, bread, meat, and cheese—we were in France after all. The next morning, an early rise followed by four hours of carrying our bikes on our back was all made worth it when we arrived at the snow-covered summit of Grand Glaiza. After enjoying the spectacular views, we pointed our bikes down the 10,800 foot descent that lay in front of us. Once back in town, Tito and I parted ways. He was off on another adventure and I was off to Bike Park Chatel for some big rig rippin'. It's no wonder why the Bike Park Chatel locals are all shredders, the park is filled with trails that have great flow and a number of sizeable features. After two days of racking up vertical, it was time to head home. A big thank you goes out to Tito for being an amazing tour guide, and to Bike Park Chatel. Their hospitality is always second to none. Until next time, see you on the trail!
  8. XC Bike of the Year Scalpel Si Carbon 3When the new Scalpel was announced it was clear that Cannondale wasn't trying to play it safe or please the masses. They set out to develop and build the fastest possible XCO / XCM / XCX racing machine and they did a mighty fine job. That it is fast is undisputed, but more importantly is the ease with which it handles its new-found speed. Read the full Scalpel Si review here. Notable mentions Silverback SestaYou can always trust the underdogs to take on the big boys. I think it's safe to say that Silverback have established themselves as an honest player in the bike market. With bikes spanning most genres, they certainly have grown up since their humble beginnings. The Sesta is living proof. The Sesta is a great bike that can run with the big boys while leaving you with some change. The long wait for the Sesta has been worth it. Silverback have created a polished dual suspension carbon race bike. Read the full Silverback Sesta review here. Pyga Stage One of earlier XC / Marathon bikes with contemporary geometry. Long, low, and slack with great pedalling manners. I only had it for a couple of days (Admin reviewed this one), but that was enough for it to show its true colors. The Pyga Stage offers a delicate balance of race focussed performance and more progressive trail capabilities. All in all a highly versatile package which can see you comfortably through a marathon stage race and still keep you smiling on a weekend trail ride with mates. Read the full Puga Stage review here. Trail Bike of the Year Evil The FollowingMany times throughout the year I found myself looking at images of Evil's The Following. It is arguably one of the best-suited bikes for local conditions and more than enough bike for most riders. With its bang up to date geometry, great pedalling manners, and rider-friendly handling, The Following deserves its time on our trails. I would argue that it is light enough for any of our stage races, yet capable enough to huck all but the blackest of black routes on local soil. Having returned it after our review period, I got to ride it again later in the year and immediately felt comfortable. It was a bit like finding your favourite pair of jeans at the back of your cupboard. It just felt right. Fast, good looking, capable, and fun. What's not to like? With all that said, what sums it up best for me is the fact that after all the bikes we rode this year, including all the excellent bikes we rode in 2015, this is the one I would like to have parked in my garage the most. I would happily dive in head first myself and say that as far as Trail / All Mountain bikes go, this is one of the best I've slung a leg over and one of the most well-rounded 29er bikes I've ridden yet. Read the full Evil The Following review here. Notable Mentions Scott Spark 940I only recently got to spend some time on Scott's new Spark and even though it sits closer to a pure trail bike, it certainly is capable and fun once dialled in. The Spark is as fun as many bikes with much more travel but retains the efficiency of a short travel bike. The Spark is a great example of just how good the combination of modern mountain bike suspension and geometry is today. Read the full Scott Spark review here. Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt 750 MSL Let's hear it for 27.5" bikes! Looking back now, I think it's safe to say that the Thunderbolt would not have scored as high on my fun-o-meter if I had ridden the The Following before it, but that's not quite fair to the Rocky. It is a super fun bike that wants to pushed hard all day long and will reward you for it. The Following and Spark are perhaps better all-rounders thanks to the bigger wheels and the rolling they bring. Having said that, if your focus is more on fun than distance, the Thunderbolt will do just fine. If it was a car the Thunderbolt would be a pocket rocket - punching above its weight class and bringing sport car performance to an everyday car. The GTI of mountain bikes. Read the full Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt review here. Products of the YearSRAM Eagle Drivetrain They gave us the Pike, they gave us the Reverb dropper post, and then 1x11 drivetrains. Then they launched the 12 speed Eagle drivetrains and with it a broad enough spread in gear ratios to put the final nail in the 2x drivetrain's coffin. Shifting is everything one would expect from a top of the range groupset, and with the option to buy an upgrade kit only, there are few reasons not to go 12-speed when the time comes to replace your current groupset. For those looking to upgrade to 1x or to replace their current worn XX1 or X01 11-speed groupsets, with the greater range of gears offering a true benefit out on the trails, it would only make sense to go Eagle. Read our first ride review of SRAM Eagle here. Specialized Power Saddle The Power saddle has ruined most other saddles for me. Before the fateful day that I tried a Power saddle for the first time, my sitting area was happy with most saddles. I've always preferred low-profile saddles with a slight raise towards the rear and a cut-out or relieve channel running down the middle. The Specialized Power ticked all those boxes, but managed to throw in a stubby nose and a fit and feel like a glove. Since then a Power saddle has been fitted to my hardtail all mountain bike, trail 29er, and road bike. I can't bear riding without one. The Power Pro offered great support and comfort on all the bikes it was tested on regardless of position and has become my saddle of choice. Read the full Specialized Power Saddle review here. Oakley Jawbreaker sunglasses I love these. I love the fit, the tech, the quality and most of all how they disappear once on your face. Coverage is great with excellent field of view and ventilation. No corners were cut and no compromises made in the design and manufacture of these. Fit, features, comfort and the quality of the optics are all outstanding, cementing Oakley's reputation as a premium manufacturer. Read the full Oakley Jawbreaker review here. Other notable mentions are ODI's Rogue Grips and DVO's Diamond fork. I will remember 2016 for ... Capable 29ers The year 29ers decided to rather go big than go home. Evil's The Wreckoning & The Following, Santa Cruz Hightower (full review to follow soon) and Pyga Stage Max all showed that 29ers have arrived in a big way. Thanks to boost and the advent of 1x drivetrains, bike designers and manufacturers have found ways to make chainstays shorter and shorter and crank the fun factor of these once called wagon wheelers to eleven. I'm not sure what the future holds for all the different wheel sizes and how each will finally be pitched but what I do know is you no longer need a smaller wheel size to play in the twisties. E-bikes For me, 2016 will also be the year of the Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo FSR 6Fattie. The way it rides (like a mountain bike), the integration of the motor, battery and other bits that make this an e-bike. The app that lets you "tune" the "e" in the e-bike sets it apart from other offerings currently on the market. With the Levo range, Specialized gave us a pedal assist bike that can be fussed about for just how good a mountain bike it is when out on the trails. In the Levo, Specialized have not only built an e-bike. They have taken their time to re-think and develop the platform to deliver a product that takes full advantage of available technology. With the advent of apps and the smartphone computer in your pocket, it makes complete sense to go the full monty, instead of simply strapping a motor to a bike.
  9. In review of 2016, Iwan Kemp looks at the best bikes and gear that he rode last year. Click here to view the article
  10. "This is a seriously nimble whip—not what you're used to from traditional fat bikes. The narrow q-factor is a dream to pedal for big racing efforts, and its short chainstays and extended reach make for balanced, natural handling on singletrack." — Andreas Hestler Intended Use: Fat XC Wheel Size: 27.5 FAT DetailsFull carbon and aluminum models available. 192mm Q-factor is 20mm narrower than standard fat bikes to improve pedaling performance and comfort. 27.5x3.8 tires for improved rollover and lower rotating weight. Fits up to 27.5x4.2 tires (when available, with safe clearance from 770mm x 104mm). Next generation fat bike geometry is longer, slacker, and more agile. Integrated chainstay protector and downtube protector. Di2 electronics-compatible with internal stealth battery port. Full carbon monocoque fork on the -90°, -70°, and -50° models. Lightweight bolt-on axles save 100g per bike compared to a Maxle. Suspension compatible. A 100mm Bluto at 20% sag maintains the ideal stock geometry. Two bottle cages on the fork, plus two in the front triangle. Front triangle Rivnuts for custom, bolt-on frame bags (not included). 1x specific. Stealth dropper post compatible. Internal cable housing. PressFit BB107 bottom bracket, ZS44|56 headset, 177mm real axle spacing. Sizing: S/M/L/XL. GeometryThe Suzi Q has a stable and balanced ride that still feels agile, thanks to super short chainstays and a lengthened reach. During the bike's design and testing phases we evaluated a wide variety of geometry and offset combinations to hone its steering dynamics. The result is a bike without any of the "autosteer" instability that plagues other fat bikes. Wheels We worked with Maxxis to design a high performance 27.5x3.8 tire and wheel system. Compared to a traditional 26x4 "race fat" system, our 27.5x3.8 tires have a larger outer diameter. That means better rollover performance and plenty of traction, without the added weight and rolling resistance of 26x5 systems. In ski terms, 26x4 tires are traditional camber skis, and the larger diameter 27.5x3.8 tires are early rise tips. No, 27.5x3.8 tires won't let you carve turns in waist-deep powder, but they do roll up over soft snow more easily. Pedaling Designed specifically to have a narrow Q-factor, pedaling the Suzi Q is more efficient and comfortable than traditional fat bikes. Whether you're racing the 1,000-mile Alaskan Iditarod Trail Invitational or going for a quick rip on your local single track, the result is a more natural feel with less fatigue and knee strain. See all the models here.
  11. The new Suzi Q challenges the narrative of slow, plodding fat bikes. Its lightweight carbon frame and narrow Q-factor are more efficient and comfortable than traditional fat bikes, perfect for everything from local singletrack loops to fat bike racing. Short chainstays and extended reach make for a stable and balanced ride that still feels agile. Click here to view the article
  12. South Africa’s leading marathon mountain bike racer, Max Knox, will race on Rocky Mountain bikes in 2017. The 29-year-old Knox won both the South African marathon championship and the Ashburton Investment National Marathon Series in 2016 and has set his sights on an expanded racing programme in 2017. Click here to view the article
  13. South African champion, Max Knox, gets familiar with the 2016 Rocky Mountain Element 990RSL in Johannesburg last week. Photo credit: Dino Lloyd Rocky Mountain is a Canadian-based international bicycle brand, which has been producing premium performance mountain bikes since 1981. It has achieved international success in various forms of mountain bike racing over the past 35 years, including overall victory in the inaugural Absa Cape Epic in 2004. Knox will be racing on the Rocky Mountain Element 999RSL, the brand’s flagship marathon/XC model, which has recently been refined with more stable (and adjustable) geometry, more efficient suspension and the accommodation of two bottles inside the main frame, making it what Rocky Mountain believes is the ideal marathon or stage race bike. “Max has shown this year that he’s really matured into a classy, consistent marathon racer. He’s reaching an age where he is likely to develop even further as an endurance athlete and we are pleased to have him competing on a Rocky Mountain Element,” said Hylton English, Rocky Mountain brand manager. “I’ve been racing full time for over a decade and have confirmed in the past two years that marathons and stage races are indeed my greatest strength. After one of my most successful years, I am looking forward to expanding on that into 2017. I’ve done a few weeks of riding on the 2016 Rocky Mountain Element 990RSL already and am thrilled with the bike,” said Knox. “I’m looking forward to the arrival of the new Element 999RSL in January and am excited to be racing on one of the world’s premier mountain bike brands. My 2017 season will be slightly different to 2016, but will still be focussed around marathons and stage races, mostly in South Africa,” added Knox. Knox will also be supported by Helly Hansen casual wear, Northwave performance clothing, shoes, helmets and gloves, adidas eyewear and This Way Out, an outdoor sport retail store chain. His title sponsor will be New Holland Agriculture. For more information on Rocky Mountain bikes, visit www.hullabaloo.co.za.
  14. The Bike I tested the 2015 Element 970 RSL. The 970RSL is second from the top in the Element range and features a full carbon frame and rear triangle using Rocky Mountain’s Smoothwall carbon technology and Smoothlink suspension design. The Element features 100mm of travel up front and 95mm on the rear. This is supplied by a Fox 32 Float fork and a Fox Float Remote CTD shock. The wheelset features Stans ZTR Crest rims, laced to Shimano XT hubs, and grip is supplied by 2.2” Maxxi’s Ikon tyres front and back. Brakes and groupset are the ever-reliable Shimano XT, while crank, bars, seatpost and stem are all Race Face Turbine parts. In most respects this is a traditional XC bike- the head angle is an aggressive 70.6 degrees. However, the stem on my small test frame was a nice and short 70mm, and paired with 740mm bars, this gives the bike a slightly more modern look and feel. It seems, however, that the bar width is consistent across the size range, so taller riders might find the bars a little narrow for their taste. Before I go on, I should note that the Element has had some exciting updates to the 2017 design- including a longer travel fork, lengthened reach, shortened chainstays, and a slacker head angle which you can read more about here. These should make the Element a more than competent trail-slayer, while hopefully maintaining pedalling efficiency and race pedigree, so it will be exciting to see how this turns out. The Ride I got to know the Element by jumping in at the deep end racing the inaugural Varsity MTB Challenge. Luckily, the Element is easy to get along with, and I had a great weekend of racing.My first impression of the Element was that it is a fun bike. When fully opened the suspension is plush, and eats up rocks and roots in the trail. When pointed downhill it feels like a bike with a lot more than 95mm travel. The wide bars and short stem mean that the steering is very direct, and gives the bike a secure, planted feel while cornering, which I found confidence inspiring. The bike also feels very nimble- certainly not the boat-like turning sensation of some 29ers. When locked out, the suspension is suitably stiff and pedals very efficiently. Using the lockout snaps the Element into race mode, and it shoots up hill like an arrow. I found the gear range of the 2x10 drivetrain to be more than adequate for any gradient encountered, despite the fact that I have been spoiled with 2X11 on my own bike. The gears shifted reliably, during prolonged racing through alternately thick mud and very dry sand. The only thing I would have considered changing with the setup is perhaps putting a meatier tyre on the front, but that is just personal preference, and the Maxxi’s Ikon performed admirably, despite my reservations. I found the remote lockout on the shock to be very handy. I prefer having remote lockout for the shock rather than the fork as it reduces potentially dangerous reaching and fiddling underneath the top tube, at the top of a trail, while the fork can be more easily adjusted on the go. The only real issue I had with the bike was with water bottles. On my small test frame, it was only possible to fit a small bottle with a very specific shape into the bottle cage, due to the position of the rebound adjust knob on the shock. This meant that I had to take great care when removing and replacing the bottle, so as not to knock the rebound switch and change the settings. I found this a bit off-putting and ended up not drinking as often as I usually would, which is not an ideal scenario. This issue is only relevant to the small frame, as the medium frame and upward fit a bottle without interference. The Verdict In short, the Element is a more-than capable marathon bike, but one that will still allow you to have a party on the trails at the weekend. Looking at the 2017 range, this is likely to be even more the case. So if you want to have your cake, and eat it too, with a bike that allows you to complete gruelling all-day rides, and also properly rip it up on the trails, the Element is well worth investigating.
  15. The Element is a dual suspension 29er XC-race weapon from Rocky Mountain. Click here to view the article
  16. Why the silk route? My idea is to cross every continent with a bike. The Silk Route is not one single path, but more a web of routes from Istanbul through Iran, Central Asia, Southern Siberia and Mongolia, all the way into China. I am riding from Beijing to Istanbul. How did you prepare for this adventure? I ride my bike regularly. I also cross train with some swimming, running and light weights. Experience from previous expeditions I know what level I need to be at. How many days and kilometres have you already completed on this adventure? What is still to be conquered ahead? I am now in Gorno-Altaysk, Southern Siberia in the Altai Mountain district. I am on day 30 and I have completed 3,330 km of the 13,000 kilometres from Beijing to Istanbul. What is the most challenging part of doing something like this solo? I am doing it unsupported through an expedition that offers you a breakfast and a dinner each day. I still need to fix my own bike, pitch my own tent, and look after everything else myself. Which situation has been your most challenging so far and why? The 3 weeks in Mongolia has been the most challenging time in my life. The weather is extreme and very unpredictable. From -10 degrees (in the Spring) to extreme headwinds in the Gobi desert with storms so strong that it broke my tent's poles. I also got lost in the Northern part of Mongolia, the day before I entered Russia. An extra 80 km on any given day is not ideal.The biggest challenge so far was breaking my pedal from my crank. The crank snapped where the pedal screws in. I was forced to pedal 100 km with one leg to get to camp at the end of the day. The next day I struggled along another 100 km to get to a town where I got it fixed temporarily. I am currently working on a long term, permanent solution. Which country have you enjoyed riding through the most this far? Mongolia without a doubt. Absolutely AWESOME and dangerously beautiful. Have you done any similar adventures before? Cairo to Cape Town. 4 months. 10 Countries.Windhoek to Cape Town via Seeheim and Solitaire is an absolute must for every biker. Expedition riding is not racing. It is a 24 hour-a-day challenge over 120-150 days and it is not just about cycling. It is about the adventure and experiencing it with all your senses. Has doing Cape to Cairo helped with your preparation for this? Without a doubt. I was able to streamline everything. Gear, clothes etc. And mentally it is a huge advantage. What bike are you riding and have you had to modify it for this journey? A standard Rocky Mountain Element 950 RSL. It worked for Africa and it is working now. Comfortable riding position and I have the option for the much needed front and rear shocks for the off road sections which are pretty rough. Completing 13,300 km on a bike - what do you do to keep your bike and gear in good working condition? Keeping the bike clean, lubing the chain regularly will save you a lot of trouble in the long run. You will have to replace the chain and cassette twice on these kinds of distances but cleaning and lubing will help prevent unnecessary breakage. What does one need to pack for an adventure like this? Do not buy any cheap gear. Pay slightly more for quality.Tent (top of the range) - two man tent Sleeping bag (top of the range) - and make sure of the temperature range Sleeping mat (top of the range) - sleep is your best recovery. Make sure you sleep well. Spares: 2 sets of extra folding tyres, 2 chains ,2 cassettes, chainlinks, tubes, patch kits, spare derailleur hanger, chainrings, extra gear cables, and brake pads. Hydration pack Little bags to attach to your frame for snacks Sunscreen minimal clothes (layer when it is cold) rain jacket amen to the guy who invented the buff (take 3) something to capture the moments (camera etc) respect for the locals and most importantly a great, open, positive attitude (and a smile). Have you had any technical difficulties so far? The storm in Mongolia broke the poles of my tent. The tent was anchored strongly to the ground but the wind bent the structure. I am still without a pole but somehow the tent still works. A bit crooked though but it works.I broke my left crank straight through at the bottom where the pedal screws in. I managed with one leg for two days and then got a temporary crank that is not really compatible. I am currently trying to get a crankset sent to me. Why cycling as a means to raise awareness and funds? It is more about the adventure and the challenges you face on such an journey. To bring a message across that one should never quit. There is ALWAYS a solution. NEVER QUIT. I love biking and biking is my choice of transportation to get through this challenging time. It is a great analogy to life actually. Know yourself. Do what you love, commit to it, prepare for it and then the challenges that are unavoidable through life will be easier.So people can relate to this story of not giving up. My slogan is #LeadersNeverQuit How can people get involved and support the initiative? They can pledge at www.feesforall.org.za. When you pledge you stand a chance to win a trip to Istanbul in October. How can people follow your journey? Live tracking at www.ivanzimmermann.com.Twitter and Instagram: @IvanZimmermann1 Facebook Page: Ivan Zimmermann Actor and Adventurer We will also be releasing a 40 minute documentary later this year.
  17. Ivan Zimmerman is riding the 2016 Silk Route cycle tour from Beijing to Istanbul to raise money for university education in South Africa. His marathon journey started on 15 May and will continue until 5 October – covering 12,280km of gruelling terrain. Since Zimmerman will be covering around 125km per day, he is asking his supporters each to pledge R125 to the #Pledge125 project. Click here to view the article
  18. “This new Element is a full-on XC marathon weapon, but with the confidence of a trail bike” says product director Alex Cogger. “People used to show up to BC Bike Race expecting to grind fire roads all day, only to walk the descents and snap their made-for-the-scale bikes in half. XC racing has evolved, and bikes that can’t handle the real world have no business on the course.” Details Full Smoothwall carbon frame weighs 2250g (size Medium, including shock and hardware. Two-tone paint on T.O. frame adds 30g) Ride-9 adjustability chip moved into the link, saving weight and bulk All sizes fit two water bottles inside the front triangle Future-proofed to run Di2, Fox Live, and a dropper post concurrently Frame available with special edition Team Only paint job Cartridge bearing pivots with simplified hardware Single-sided chainstay pivots for a narrower rear triangle—eliminates heel rub, even with Boost spacing Fits standard, widely available 6.5x1.5 shocks 2x compatible Clearance for 29x2.35 tires Full-length internal shift, dropper post, and lockout routing, plus internal brake routing in the front triangle Oversized headtube and downtube ports for ease of cable routing New derailleur hanger design reduces hardware complexity Lightweight bolt-on axle saves 35g compared to a traditional Boost axle PressFit BB92 bottom bracket, ZS44 | ZS56 headset Post-mount 160mm rear brake Max 1x chainring size is 38t with SRAM, 36t with Race Face Max 2x chainring size is a full size 28t/40t Sizing: S/M/L/XL/XXL Suspension We tuned our four-bar Smoothlink suspension to increase the anti-squat values and maximize pedaling performance without sacrificing the traditional Rocky Mountain ride feel. It’s supple off the top and features good progression to avoid bottoming. We focused on mid-stroke support to keep more travel available, and lowered the shock leverage ratio for better suspension performance and adjustments. Party up front, business in the back. The new Element was designed around a longer 120mm fork because it’s nice to have a bit more forgiveness four hours into a hammerfest. The result is a bike that pedals like a rocketship, but doesn’t get hung up or turn skittish when things get technical. Geometry The new Element received a substantial geometry update, while retaining the confidence and handling that people loved about the previous generation. It’s slacker to keep things stable when you’re seeing stars four hours in, but uses a longer fork offset to keep steering dynamics precise. We’ve shortened the rear centre, lengthened the reach slightly, and steepened the seat-tube angle—allowing for shorter stems and wider bars without sacrificing a powerful pedaling position. The bike hasn’t been stretched into downhill sled territory, but we’re offering an XXL size for those that need longer reach. Ride-9 Adjustability With the increased demands of modern XC courses and stage races, our Ride-9 adjustment system allows riders to fine-tune the Element’s geometry and suspension. In adapting the system from our trail bikes, we moved it from the forward shock mount into the link—reducing weight and bulk. The headtube angle can be adjusted from 69° to 70° and the suspension rate can be tuned for an XC race feel or a more aggressive trail feel. For multi-day stage racing, marathon racing, and real world XC, this makes it easy to dial in the perfect balance of snappy, confident, and responsive. TechnologiesThe Ride-9 system allows riders to adjust geometry and suspension to specific riding styles and terrain. Nine configurations are possible thanks to two interlocking chip inserts. Smoothwall carbon uses one of the world’s most sophisticated carbon processes to build frames with industry leading stiffness-to-weight, ride quality, and durability. By using rigid internal molds, we are able to perfect the shape of the internal features and eliminate excess materials. We use different types of carbon in specific frame areas to maximize stiffness and impact resistance while minimizing overall weight. Smoothlink suspension stays supple yet supportive through a wider range of gears than conventional single pivot or other four-bar suspension configurations. This patented system reduces both pedal-bob and bottom-outs, while allowing us to fine tune variables like braking and climbing traction across a wide range of intended uses. Size Specific Tune ensures that riders of all sizes get the right balance of small-bump compliance, mid-stroke support, and end-stroke progressiveness. Our design team does custom shock tunes based on real world field testing, and adjusts each tune for every specific frame size, from S to XXL. Element Models Element 999 RSL. Element 990 RSL BC EDITION Element 990 RSL BC EDITION Element 970 RSL Element 970 RSL Element 950 RSL Element 930 RSL
  19. This is the result of over two decades at the front of the pack. The new Element features more efficient suspension performance, refined marathon geometry, Ride-9 adjustability, and room for two bottles inside the front triangle. The smallest details were examined in search of point-n-shoot rigidity and unrivalled speed. Click here to view the article
  20. Hi, Does anyone know where I can look at "Rocky Mountain" Bikes is Johannesburg ? Is there a retailer that sells this brand in Jhb ? I like the look of the bikes but would like to get a good feel before buying one. Your feedback will be appreciated. Thanks Mark
  21. Dear Fellow MTB Cyclists! I have narrowed down my choice of MTB Hardtail (29 inch): 1. Momsen AL 329 - R12k 2. Rocky Mountain 940 Trailhead - R10k Considering that I am not a racer, but rather a casual rider who likes to do +- 30km to 40km on weekends, mostly on easy routes (dirt roads, footpaths - ie not too technical) I would like to know which of these is more comfortable to ride ? They both have similar components but the Momsen has a slightly different (more relaxed) geometry. What do you think ? Regards Mark
  22. Rocky Mountain make an aluminium hardtail with a modest specification. Yes, it came as a surprise to me too. Departing from the image of their mid to high end performance bikes, the Trailhead seeks to bring the Rocky Mountain brand to a wider market. Click here to view the article
  23. The bike The Rocky Mountain Trailhead 940 is build around a sturdy aluminium hardtail frame equipped with a well thought out component selection. The royal red colour scheme and maple leaf decals gives the bike a classy look. With head angle a smidgen over 70 and chainstays measuring in at 447 mm, the Trailhead's geometry leans more towards comfortable distance covering rather than single track rowdiness. The components So what can we expect from a R13,999 hardtail these days? Quite a lot actually.Drivetrain: The Trailhead features a Shimano 2x10 drivetrain. The crankset and shifters are Shimano’s workhorse Deore range while the derailleur is the more upmarket SLX level. Rocky Mountain took no short cuts with the Shimano gearing. They worked flawlessly without missing a shift throughout testing. The Deore range may be heavier than Shimano’s pricier tiers but out on the trails the difference in performance is nearly unnoticeable.Brakes: Stopping is controlled by Shimano’s M446 hydraulic disc brakes. Shimano have a reputation for making good stoppers and this carries through to their non-series brakes. Although the brakes felt a bit crude under hard braking, they stopped the bike well and consistently. Fork: The fork is a RockShox Recon Silver with a coil spring featuring a TurnKey lockout and rebound adjustment. The RockShox coil fork, although lacking the small bump sensitivity and adjustment of more expensive forks, did a good job of soaking up the knocks with a confidence inspiring sturdy feel. Wheels: All too often manufacturers skimp on the wheelset to make savings in the lower end of the bike market. The Trailhead makes an attempt to avoid this trap with a reliable feeling set of WTB SX19 rims on Shimano hubs. Tyres: The spindly Schwalbe Rapid Rob tyres let the rest of the Trailhead build down. Tyres thankfully are a relatively easy fix. More on this in the 'On the Trail' section below. Controls: The Rocky Mountain branded cockpit has some modern inspiration with a shortish stem (considering the 100mm plus stems usually applied in this price range) and a decent length handlebar. The saddle is a comfortable WTB Volt. On the trail Out on the trails, the Rocky Mountain Trailhead impressed me with its no nonsense performance.I found the extra large Rocky Mountain to be a good fit for me at 193 cm tall. All it took was a quick seatpost height adjustment and I was ready to ride. The frame is a rather standard for a entry level hardtail with a sloping toptube for a more compact feel. The widish handlebar and restrained stem meant that handling felt up to date. The Trailhead ate up kilometres on open sections like jeep tracks or smoother single track. Morning Table Mountain King's Blockhouse attacks and commutes through the Constantia Greenbelts were the ideal type of riding for the Trailhead. For this type of riding, I thought the Trailhead matched the performance of bikes twice its price. The Trailhead would be well suited to fun rides and moderately technical marathon type events. Climbing on the Trailhead was efficient, even with our extra large bike tipping the scales at 13.7 kilograms. The 2x10 gearing has excellent range and versatility, making even the steeper climbs and more remote parts of the mountain accessible to less fit riders. The Trailhead is composed on technical single track (both up and down) and will get you through most intermediate trails. But should you really want to push hard on the climbs and descents, you will need to replace the Schwalbe Rapid Rob for a tyre with more grip and strength, as they simply gave up when speeds increased and turns became tight. Rocky Mountain Trailhead 950 If you wish the Trailhead 940 had just a few more luxuries, then Rocky Mountain also have a Trailhead 950. The 950 model features a Manitou Marvel air fork, Shimano XT rear derailleur and shifters, and Shimano Deore brakes. This model retails for R16 700. In the end The Rocky Mountain Trailhead shows that trickle down technology is improving the offering of new bikes in the lower end of the market. If you're in the market for a new mountain in the R14 000 range, it may be worth considering the Rocky Mountain Trailhead. Full specification: FrameROCKY MOUNTAIN 6061 SL SERIES CUSTOM HYDROFORMED ALLOY. THREADED BB. TAPERED ZEROSTACK HEADTUBEForkROCKSHOX RECON SILVER TK 29. 100MM (XS: 80MM). TURNKEY LOCKOUT / REBOUNDHeadsetFSA #57 INTERNAL: ZS44 | ZS56MMStemROCKY MOUNTAIN L7 7° X 60-90MMHandlebarROCKY MOUNTAIN ZERO9 FLAT 31.8MM X 720MM X 9° SWEEPGripsROCKY MOUNTAIN XC KRATONBrakesSHIMANO M446 HYDRAULIC DISC 160MMBrake LeversSHIMANO M446ShiftersSHIMANO DEORE RAPID FIRE 10SPDFront DerailleurSHIMANO DEORE 31.8MM 10SPDRear DerailleurSHIMANO SLX SHADOW 10SPDCranksetSHIMANO M615 170-175MM 38/24T 2X10SPDBottom BracketSHIMANO SM-BB52 2 PIECECassetteSHIMANO HG50 11-36T 10SPDChainSHIMANO HG54 10SPDHubsSHIMANO RM33 / CENTERLOCK / 32HSpokes STAINLESSRimsWHEELTECH SX19 BY WTB RIMSTyresSCHWALBE RAPID ROB 29" X 2.1"SeatpostROCKY MOUNTAIN L2B 27.2MM X 400MMSaddleWTB VOLTSizesXS - S - M - L - XL
  24. Designed to lay waste to the world’s roughest trails, the Slayer is back as an all-carbon weapon. From the most aggressive Enduro World Series tracks to bike park laps and big mountain lines, its downhill-bike capability and pedaling responsiveness are matched with an uncanny ability to find and hold speed in rugged terrain. All killer, no filler. Click here to view the article
  25. Intended Use: Enduro / All Mountain Front Travel: 170mm Rear Travel: 165mm Wheel Size: 27.5” “I’m super fired up that the Slayer is back,” says team rider Thomas Vanderham. “A few things really stood out to me through the development process—it pedals incredibly well, carries a ton of speed, and that extra bit of travel is awesome when you really want to rally! I see myself spending a ton of time on this bike." DetailsFull Smoothwall™ carbon frame Ride-4™ adjustability chip for precise geometry adjustments All sizes fit one water bottle inside the front triangle Future-proofed to run Di2 and a dropper post concurrently Max type Enduro cartridge bearing pivots with simplified hardware, Pipelock™ rocker link pivot Shock-eyelet bearings for small-bump sensitivity Single-sided chainstay and seatstay pivots for a narrower rear triangle—eliminates heel rub, even with Boost spacing Metric shock, 230x65 1x specific Clearance for up to 27.5x2.5 “wide trail” tires, and compatible with 26+ tires (26x3.0) Full-length internal dropper post and lockout routing. Internal brake routing in the front triangle, internal tube-in-tube shift routing Oversized downtube ports for ease of cable routing New derailleur hanger design reduces hardware complexity Lightweight bolt-on axle saves 35g compared to a traditional Boost axle PressFit BB92 bottom bracket, ZS44 | ZS56 headset Post-mount 180mm rear brake Max chainring size is 36t Sizing: S/M/L/XL Suspension Our four-bar Smoothlink™ suspension has been tuned to eat up rough terrain and square-edged hits. We also increased the anti-squat values to make sure the bike pedals efficiently—whether you’re sprinting for a transfer stage or grinding towards a backcountry descent.The Slayer features shock-mount bearings for incredible small-bump suppleness. Predictable, efficient, and capable, its rate curve provides good support at sag and a moderate ramp towards the end-stroke. Geometry When we decided to bring the Slayer back, we knew it needed the crush-everything-in-its-path attitude of the previous generation while keeping the agility and efficiency that made it a favourite among aggressive trail riders. The updated geometry retains a fairly steep seat-tube angle, while the reach has been extended and the head-tube angle has been slackened. We kept the BB drop neutral and the rear centre quite short to improve cornering, and shortened the seat-tube lengths to make room for the next generation of longer dropper posts. Our Ride-4™ adjustability system was chosen for the Slayer in order to provide precise geometry adjustments while leaving the suspension curve virtually unaffected. The head-tube and seat-tube angles can be changed by just over a degree, and the bottom-bracket can be raised or lowered by 7.5mm. This allows racers to adapt their geometry from track-to-track while keeping shock tuning predictable and simple. TechnologiesThe RIDE-4™ system uses a single chip insert to adjust the geometry on bikes that require more subtle changes. This allows for more precise adjustments and more isolated shock-tuning. Smoothwall™ carbon uses one of the world’s most sophisticated carbon processes to build frames with industry leading stiffness-to-weight, ride quality, and durability. By using rigid internal molds, we are able to perfect the shape of the internal features and eliminate excess materials. We use different types of carbon in specific frame areas to maximize stiffness and impact resistance while minimizing overall weight. Smoothlink™ suspension stays supple yet supportive through a wider range of gears than conventional single pivot or other four-bar suspension configurations. This patented system reduces both pedal-bob and bottom-outs, while allowing us to fine tune variables like braking and climbing traction across a wide range of intended uses. The Pipelock™ collet system expands radially and locks into the frame, creating a wide and rigid pivot stance. Using Pipelock collets lowers front triangle pivot weights while maximizing lateral stiffness. Size Specific Tune™ ensures that riders of all sizes get the right balance of small-bump compliance, mid-stroke support, and end-stroke progressiveness. Our design team does custom shock tunes based on real world field testing, and adjusts each tune for every specific frame size, from S to XXL. Models Slayer 790 MSL Slayer 770 MSL Slayer 750 MSL Slayer 730 MSL Slayer 790 MSL Frame Only
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