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  1. Still trying my hand for my very first build project. Converting a 2010 Cannondale Trail F4 SL MTB to a “gravel bike”. Think its more like trying to get it the same as my Giant ATX 760 in the 90’s with a rigid fork. Anyway, I digressed. Need to get reducer cups or new headset to be able to fit new fork (1.5” to tapered or 1 1/8). Was thinking Cane Creek 40something Done the research: asking to confirm that I got the type right please? What type of headset is it? There are three types of headset, IS (Integrated System), EC (External Cup) and ZS (Zero Stack). Integrated headsets have the bearing cups pre-built into the head tube. You simply drop the bearings in and you're away (This isn't the Cannondale Trail SL). External cup headsets are pressed into the frame (commonly also known as press-fit headsets) and the bearings sit outside of the frame. Zero stack headsets are the half-way house. They are pressed into the frame and the bearing is generally within the frame too. From the images of my bike I would say Zero Stack. That right? Thanks!
  2. Hi everyone, not sure if this is the best place to post this but I came across someone trying to sell a bike today that I think was stolen. It is a very unique bike and seemed to be well-loved, hence my thoughts on why it is odd that the owner was trying to sell it. The bike is a red Cannondale R300, that has been converted to a one-by with a Shimano XT (I think M8000 Derailleur and cassette) drivetrain, and a cSixx front chainring that was inverted. It also had flat Easton bars on it. Very similar to the picture below, with a slimmer seat, black foam grips and the one-by drivetrain. Let me know if this is actually is a stolen bike.
  3. It’s no secret that COVID-19 has decimated the racing calendar over the last 12 months but it is great to see Factory Racing Teams making moves to strengthen their squads ahead of what will hopefully be a fierce 2021 World Cup season. The Cannondale Factory Racing Team recently announced the signing of Alan Hatherly, winner of the 2018 U23 Cross Country World Championships and the 2019 e-MTB XCO UCI World Championships, among many other accolades. We caught up with Alan between training camps to get the low down on his new race machine, the 2021 Cannondale Scalpel Hi-Mod 1. [h2]Alan Hatherly's Cannondale 2021 Scalpel Hi-Mod 1[/h2] [spec_list][spec_list_row='Frame']Cannondale 2021 Scalpel Hi-Mod 1[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Fork']Lefty Ocho Carbon 100mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Shock']Fox Float DPS Factory EVOL, 100mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Rims']Enve M525 Carbon[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Rear Hub']DT Swiss 240s[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Front Hub']Lefty[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Front Tyre']Schwalbe Racing Ralph 29 x 2.25[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Rear Tyre']Schwalbe Racing Ralph 29 x 2.25[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Handlebar']Enve M5 720mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Stem']Enve 90mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Seatpost']Cannondale Dropper Post[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Saddle']Prologo Scratch M5 Space[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Brakes']Shimano XTR M9100[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Rotors']Shimano RT 81 160mm[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Shifter']Shimano XTR[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Rear derailleur']Shimano XTR[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Cassette']Shimano XTR 10 - 51T 12-Speed[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Crank arms']Shimano XTR with Stages powermeter[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Chain']Shimano XTR[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Chainring']Shimano XTR 36T[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Pedals']Shimano XTR[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Bottle cages']Cannondale carbon[/spec_list_row][spec_list_row='Weight']9.76kg (without pedals)[/spec_list_row][/spec_list] Cannondale has significantly updated the Scalpel range, a frame that has become famous from winning races all over the world since 2001 and garnering an almost cult-like following. Alan’s Scalpel features Cannondale’s iconic Ocho Lefty carbon fork with a significant practical update, the StopLock release system which quickly frees the brake and mount for easy removal of the front wheel. The rear shock is the industry-leading Fox Float DPS Factory EVOL 100mm but the most interesting part of the rear suspension technology is the updated rear triangle. It features what Cannondale call their “FlexPivot” chainstays. Basically, the chainstays flatten out at the rear to add more flex. This also means the rear triangle has fewer pivots and bearings, significantly reducing frame weight and maintenance requirements. The geometry on the 2021 Scalpel frame has been updated to feature Cannondale's “OutFront” steering geometry. This means that the head tube angle is slightly slacker than previous Scalpels, among other tweaks. In conjunction with the longer Lefty fork offset, Cannondale claims that the new geometry has significantly increased traction and rider confidence. It is no surprise to find Shimano’s race-focussed XTR 12-speed groupset fitted with a 10-51t rear cassette and 36t front chainring. The matted XTR shifters share space on the handlebars with remote suspension lockouts and a lever for the Cannondale dropper post. Interestingly, the chain guide has been reduced from a closed cage to just a block which appears to act more like a limiter. The XTR cranks are also matted with a Stages crank arm for power readings, and lightweight XTR cross-country pedals. The front hub is the Lefty 60 and the rear hub is the highly regarded DT Swiss 240s. Both hubs are laced to Enve's M525 carbon rim via Hologram spokes. Schwalbe Racing Ralph 29 x 2.25 tan walls finish off this lightweight wheelset. The cockpit features the Enve M Series carbon handlebar and stem that is found on across the Factory Racing Team bikes. No need to change a good thing right? With all the race team updates, the claimed weight (excluding pedals) on this 2021 Scalpel is 9.76 kg.
  4. ROLA Motor Group are putting their money where their mouth is in a big way by supporting some of SA’s best athletes. In a sport where sponsorship is often hard to come by it is great to see a company backing our local cycling legends as much as they do. We caught up with Alan Hatherly after he took delivery of his Toyota Hilux 2.4 GD6 double cab to chat about 2020 as a pro rider and what he has lined up for the future with his new team, Cannondale Factory Racing. Click here to view the article
  5. Bike Hub: 2020 was a tough year for everyone, how have you stayed motivated with so few races? 2020 was an insane year that’s for sure. So many times back to the drawing board to reassess the current situation and rebuild a new game plan. For me the challenge of adjusting to indoor riding was a big motivation. I really enjoyed the change and still use what I’ve learnt during that time today. Additionally - knowing that we had so few races really was a motivation booster. Since the race ‘season’ was so condensed I really had to commit 110% and be in the best shape possible, which I’m really glad I was and that it worked out the way it did with me grabbing my first Elite World Cup podium after such a tricky build up. Alan Hatherly BH: Tell us about that World Cup podium result. You're no stranger to podiums, but this was your first at Elite level and in a turbulent year. With only two World Cup XCO races last year it must have been all the more special. It was an unreal moment for me as it’s been a career goal for many years to one day reach an elite World Cup podium. To achieve it after such an insane year is really special to me and it’s definitely lifted my personal goals and expectations for the 2021 season. My eyes are set now on building towards podium/close to podium consistency throughout the season. AH BH: 2021 looks to be a huge year with the Olympic Games, how has your preparation gone so far? So far 2021 has been a little bit like last year with closed borders and travelling being difficult. I’m really hoping to head over to Europe soon to get some international racing done with the Cannondale Factory Racing crew. Having no races so far this year has opened up my preparation period and I’ve managed to really capitalise on that so far fortunately. The season has shifted a little later with Cape Epic now being in October which I think works out really well for me actually because I can now focus fully on my World Cup and Olympic aspirations for this season. So far all looks good to go ahead with the Olympics so I’m really excited to see the game plan start coming together! AH BH: Your team sponsorships are of course vital, but what do sponsors like Rola Motor Group mean for you as an athlete? Partnerships like Rola Motor Group are invaluable. The journey, friendship and networking opportunities that are presented really allow me to expand my brand awareness while giving back to Rola. The group is passionate about cycling which makes the vision, projects and engagement that much better for the relationship. Obviously it’s also really amazing to be able to drive incredible new cars around like my current vehicle - the 2021 Toyota Hilux 2.4 Raider 4x4! AH BH: 2021 also sees you racing with a new team, how did that come about? I was up for renewal of my current contract and it opened a door for discussion with the Cannondale Factory Racing team. The team always appealed to me with how they operate, always delivering when it counts the most, and the good vibes around the crew at all times. They also have had legends of the sport in their colours and I’m really honoured to be wearing those colours for the years ahead! So far it’s been an amazing adjustment and I’m looking forward to hitting the start line and levelling up around my power team mates Henrique Avanicini, Manuel Fumic and Simon Andreassen. AH BH: What are you looking forward to the most with the new team? Learning from the crew and my teammates so I can keep progressing and working towards some top World Cup results consistently. It’s going to be a dream when the four of us CFR riders are rolling together at the World Cups and at the Cape Epic later this year when we go for yellow! AH BH: In closing, what advice would you give your teenage self trying to come through the ranks into professional cycling. Patience is the key! Steady progression is worth more than having one stand out year and then disappearing into the back of the field. Also get as much international exposure as you can because the adjustment to the level and depth of field takes a lot of time but if you work step by step you’ll find yourself working your way towards the sharp end of the field. The South African level is really high, it’s just a matter of executing that level and still going fast when you’re around 100 riders! AH This feature was made possible by the Rola Motor Group.Make use of their Online Car Services for: Buying new, demo or pre-owned vehicles. Selling your current car. Vehicle Finance solutions or servicing a vehicle: They also provide Bicycle finance. https://www.rola.co.za/
  6. We caught up with Alan to get the low down on his new machine, the 2021 Cannondale Scalpel Hi-Mod 1. View full article
  7. Cannondale Factory Racing is ready for 2021 and beyond. World #1 Henrique Avancini and veteran teammate Manuel Fumic are joined by former junior CX and XC World Champion Simon Andreassen (DEN) and former U23 & E-bike World Champion Alan Hatherly (RSA) on the CFR roster. Both additions to the team had breakout results in 2020, with Andreassen winning his first Elite XCO World Cup and Alan securing an Elite XCO World Cup podium. The newly formed team spent two weeks together for a small team camp to prepare for the 2021 season, where the focus will be on the UCI MTB XC World Cup, UCI World Championships, the Olympic games in Tokyo and the ABSA Cape Epic in October. This is really a dream come true to be wearing the Cannondale colors for the upcoming season and beyond. Excitement levels are high for this new journey alongside powerhouse teammates! I can’t wait for the season to commence and to get racing on the new machine with some big goals in place for the 2021 season. I’m confident that I’m going to level up and learn in this space which is also really exciting. Alan Hatherly It’s with such excitement and honor that I am joining Cannondale Factory Racing. One of those scenarios where reality beats imagination. It’s a complete game changer for me - especially after being on the first team camp and seeing how professionally the team works and how much fun we have together. Simon Andreassen It’s great to see young guys with so much talent and willing to work hard toward their goals. With their talent and the Cannondale Factory Racing way of working, they going to have the tools to become important and significant athletes for our sport. CFR has developed a great working method and I believe Alan and Simon are going to have the best environment for their development. They both know what it takes to win. They both showed how fast they can go. Now it’s about learning how to be consistent and built a solid career. They add a lot of freshness and I truly believe they going to find the finest expertise on how to get the work done. CFR future looks great. Henrique Avancini Having Alan and Simon on board for 2021 and beyond, alongside World #1 Henrique Avancini, and Manuel Fumic was the next logical step for CFR. Simon and Alan are 2 of the most promising up and coming riders from the U23 and already delivered Elite World Cup podium performances in 2020. Every single rider on the team has been a World Champion in their careers already. We expect some great things from this new team composition and the fun and laughs we had at team camp are a good indicator to be on the right track. Daniel Hespeler (CFR Team Manager)
  8. Hello all, I am looking at investing in a road bike with the idea to use it for the next decade, at least. I am weighing up two options, the Cannondale super six carbon (2015), 10-speed, which has american classic wheels, easton carbon handle bars and comes with a left-crank watt meter... compared to a Merida Scultura 4000 (2016), 11-speed, which has upgrades of campagnolo chorus parts. The Merida is about R3000 cheaper, when comparing both bikes as is. Any advice? I am waiting to hear whether a 52/36 crankset can fit the Merida, otherwise it will come with compact crank. Cannondale has a 52/36 already. Both bikes are second hand
  9. Evening all. I’m thinking of doing an everesting, and I was hoping to find out if I could convert my Supersix’s 53/39 spidering on si sl2 cranks to a 1x MTB chainring, I’m thinking 30t cannondale spidering. The reason I want to do this is because I am running campy super record and my max rear cog is 29, and this seems like a cheaper option if possible than a drivetrain upgrade. If you have any knowledge on the topic, please let me know!
  10. I found this Cannondale on the FB marketplace with cryptically little written about it: https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/1337450769777748/ in case anyone is on the lookout for this bike.
  11. Keen-eyed South Africans might have had a little teaser of this bike as the Cannondale Factory Racing team did a fair amount of testing in the Cape. Those taking part in pre-COVID lockdown racing might have spotted Manuel Fumic and Henrique Avancini riding the bike at the Tankwa Trek ahead of the ill-fated Cape Epic. Also if you hung around at the right coffee shop in Stellenbosch, you’d have gotten a glimpse of a lightly camouflaged bike during the summer. Well, the speculation is now over as we’ve got all the details about the all-new Scalpel. We rode the previous iteration of the Scalpel in early 2018 and the Ocho version when it was released later that year. Back then we sang its praises and even by 2020 standards the bike mostly holds its own. So what does a brand improve on when the existing platform is already well optimised? Scott Vogelmann, Senior Product Manager at Cannondale, explained the process they followed in developing the new Scalpel via a Zoom call. Driven by feedback from the Cannondale Factory Racing, the ability to not hesitate during any part of the race was a guiding principle for the product team. Among other things, that means knowing you have traction on a slippery climb or not having to ease up when charging into a downhill corner with confidence in braking power. All-New FlexPivot Suspension The most obvious change is the all-new four-bar FlexPivot suspension design. The out-going bike used a single pivot with a swing link that dropped down from the nook of the top tube and seat tube. The new design utilises a more compact rocker that now connects to a mounting midway down the seat tube. Vital to the new Scalpel’s suspension system is the flattened carbon fibre flex zones into the rear of both chainstays. Cannondale says that these flex zones perform similarly to how a Horst link pivot would. The advantages of this system to racers is weight savings and a stiffer rear end with fewer parts to flex under power. An important consideration for hot South African marathon riding is that there is still plenty of space for two water bottles within the front triangle.The FlexPivot bends to provide a pivot-like compliance for the Scalpel's new suspension system. Of course, on the front of the bike is Cannondale’s iconic Lefty Ocho fork. Geometry and Frame Details Along with the new suspension, the Scalpel has undergone the knife on the frame shape too. The tubing has been refined with a more angular shape that carries the new Cannondale design language. The geometry has been adapted to be more forgiving with a 68-degree head angle (that’s one-and-a-half degrees slacker than the outgoing bike) and sharper effective seat tube angle (now 74.5 degrees) to give the rider a commanding pedalling position in the saddle. The reach on the Large frame we tested is 455 millimetres with a 1175 millimetre wheelbase. Cannondale claim that the new Scalpel frame weighs just over 1900 grams with the shock. This is the first Scalpel with Boost 148mm rear axle spacing and the bike continues to employ Cannondale’s Asymmetric Integration (Ai) by outwardly offsetting the drivetrain and rear hub. This allows Cannondale additional space to shorten chainstay length (which is 436mm) while widening tyre clearance and improving wheel stiffness. The bottom bracket is PressFit with Cannondale’s HollowGram cranks fitted across the range. Cross country riders who appreciate the benefits of higher volume tyres will be pleased to hear that the Scalpel is rated for up to 2.4” tyres. The nifty Speed Release axle, developed in partnership with Mavic and carried over from the disc road bike models, allows for quick removal of the rear wheel. The Scalpel has full internal cable routing. The chainstays now tuck neatly into an alcove just above the bottom bracket which allows for a completely internal cable path to the back of the bike while the shock lockout moves through the top tube. It’s mountain biking and you’re bound to have a mechanical or flat. The all-new Stash Kit hopes to make carrying spares convenient. The Stash adaptor attaches neatly to the downtube of the Scalpel under the water bottle mount. A Fabric 8-in-1 multitool slides snuggly into a compartment with attachments for a Dynaplug tubeless kit and a CO2 canister or a mini pump on the other side. It’s an included item on some of the higher specification models. Scalpel SE Cannondale will also be releasing a Scalpel SE for riders who enjoy a super-light trail bike or simply some comfort for longer format racing. The travel on the SE models is bumped up to 120mm on both the front and the rear; resulting in an even slacker, more compliant bike. The SE models will be equipped with higher volume tyres and a dropper seat post. Scalpel Carbon SE 1 The bike is not ready alongside the launch of the shorter travel Scalpel but will be announced in detail later in the year. In the meantime, as the Scalpel and Scalpel SE use the same platform, the local distributor can custom build a 120 mm Scalpel using Fox components. Chat to your local Cannondale dealer for more details on this option. First Ride Impressions: Cannondale Scalpel 2 Testing out a new mountain bike during lockdown presents some unique challenges. My five-kilometre radius offers little in the way of terrain suitable for a proper thrashing of a bike destined for World Cup courses. With some imagination my neighbourhood transformed into an urban cross country circuit, but still lacked the features needed to truly test out the bike. While I can’t yet attest to the grip or braking performance under pressure, initial impressions are good. Visually, the new bike is still unmistakably a Scalpel with some modernisation. The Stash Kit is very neatly integrated with the frame and easy to access even while riding. The orange fade colourway on the new bike didn’t appeal at first, but it’s slowly growing on me. On the bike my position felt a touch more comfortable relative to the previous Scalpel, with less of that aggressive “over the bars” feel. I was happy to throw it down a few steep staircases, despite the lack of a dropper post I’ve become too dependent on. Uphill the bike is light and responsive, even helping to set a new PB on a sprint up a regular tar climb. Not bad with knobblies, but the real test will be on slippery, technical trails. The Wheel Sensor records speed, distance and time which it transmits to your device or the Cannondale App. Although this is an admittedly thin “First Ride Review”, the new Scalpel has us excited. Let’s be honest, it was hard to go too far wrong coming from the old platform. Aside from the visual refresh, under the “hood” the new four-bar suspension linkage promises meaningful improvements in braking and traction performance. Finally, despite the death spiral in the value of the ZAR, the R 99,995 price tag is reasonable in the context of high-end carbon mountain bikes. Available Models The new Scalpel is available immediately in South Africa from your local Cannondale dealer. At launch the following models will be available Scalpel Hi-MOD 1, Scalpel Carbon 2, and Scalpel Carbon 3. There will be more models at varying specification levels announced in the near future but for now, take a look at the details of the available bikes below. Scalpel Hi-MOD Ultimate FrameAll-New, 100mm travel, BallisTec Hi-Mod Carbon, Proportional Response Tuned, FlexPivot Chainstay, PF30-83, Tapered Headtube, Speed Release 12mm thru axle, Ai Offset, Stash compatibleForkLefty Ocho Carbon, 100mm, Chamber Damper with remote lockout, OppO Spring System, tapered steerer, 55mm offsetRear ShockFox Float DPS Factory EVOL, 100mm, remote lockout, adjustable reboundRimsENVE M525 Carbon, 24h, tubeless readyHubs[F] Lefty 60 / [R] Custom DT Swiss, 36t Star Ratchet, 12x148mm thru-axleSpokesDT Swiss Aerolite, straight pullTyres[F] Schwalbe Racing Ray EVO, 29 x 2.25", SnakeSkin, Addix Speedgrip, tubeless ready, [R] Schwalbe Racing Ralph EVO, 29 x 2.25", SnakeSkin, Addix Speed, tubeless readyCranksetSRAM XX1 Eagle DUB, 34T, Ai offsetBottom BracketSRAM DUB PF30 MTB83ChainSRAM XX1 Eagle, Copper, 12-speedRear CogsSRAM XG-1299, XX1 Eagle, Copper, 10-52, 12-speedRear DerailleurSRAM XX1 Eagle AXSShiftersSRAM Eagle AXS, 12-speedHandlebarENVE M5, Carbon, 31.8mm, 5mm rise, 9° sweep, 760mmGripsESI Chunky Silicone, 32mm dia.StemCannondale 1, 7075 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 7°HeadsetIntegrated, 1-1/8 to 1.5", sealed angular contact bearings BrakesSRAM Level Ultimate hydraulic disc, 160/160mm Centerline X rotorsBrake LeversSRAM Level Ultimate hydraulic discSaddlePROLOGO Dimension NDR CPC Tirox SaddleSeatpostENVE Carbon, 31.6 x 400mm, 0mm offsetSizesS, M, L, XLColourCopper (CPR)ExtrasStash Kit (Fabric 8 in 1 Mini Tool and Dynaplug tubeless puncture repair tool)Claimed Weight (excluding Stash)9.45 kgSuggested Retail PriceR 199,995.00 Scalpel Hi-MOD 1 FrameAll-New, 100mm travel , BallisTec Hi-Mod Carbon, Proportional Response Tuned, FlexPivot Chainstay, PF30-83, Tapered Headtube, Speed Release 12mm thru axle, Ai Offset, Stash compatibleForkLefty Ocho Carbon, 100mm, Chamber Damper with remote lockout, OppO Spring System, tapered steerer, 55mm offsetRear ShockFox Float DPS Factory EVOL, 100mm, remote lockout, adjustable reboundRimsHollowGram 25, Superlight Hi-Impact Carbon, 28h, 25mm IW, tubeless readyHubs[F] Lefty 60 [R] DT Swiss, 12x148 SpokesHollowGram 2.0/1.8/2.0Tyres[F] Schwalbe Racing Ralph, 29 x 2.25", Snake Skin, Addix Speed Compound, tubeless ready, [R] Schwalbe Racing Ralph, 29 x 2.25", Snake Skin, Addix Speed Compound, tubeless readyCrankHollowGram, BB30a, OPI SpideRing, 34T, Ai offsetBottom BracketCannondale Alloy PressFit30ChainShimano XT, 12-speedRear CogsShimano XT, 10-51, 12-speedRear DerailleurShimano XTR, Shadow PlusShiftersShimano XTR, 12-speedHandlebarCannondale 1 Flat, Carbon, 31.8mm, 9° back, 760mmGripsESI Silicone 32mm GripsStemCannondale 1, 7075 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 7°HeadsetIntegrated, 1-1/8 to 1.5", sealed angular contact bearings BrakesXTR hydraulic disc, 160mm Ice Tech rotors Brake LeversShimano XTR hydraulic discSaddlePrologo Dimension NOR, Tirox railsSeatpostENVE Carbon, 31.6 x 400mm, 0mm offsetSizesS, M, L, XLColourTeam Replica Carbon w/ Cannondale Green (REP)ExtrasStash Kit (Fabric 8 in 1 Mini Tool and Dynaplug tubeless puncture repair tool)Claimed Weight (excluding Stash)9.76 kgSuggested Retail PriceR 139,995.00 Scalpel Carbon LTD FrameAll-New, 100mm travel, BallisTec Carbon, Proportional Response Tuned, FlexPivot Chainstay, PF30-83, Tapered Headtube,Speed Release 12mm thru axle, Ai Offset, Stash compatibleForkLefty Ocho, 100mm, Chamber Damper with remote lockout, OppO Spring System, tapered steerer, 55mm offsetRear ShockFox Float DPS Performance Elite EVOL, remote lockout, adjustable reboundRimsHollowGram 25, Superlight Hi-Impact Carbon, 28h, 25mm IW, tubeless readyHubs[F] HollowGram Lefty 60 / [R] HollowGram w/DT Swiss Star Ratchet internals, 12x148mmSpokesDT Swiss Competition Race, straight-pullTyres[F] Schwalbe Racing Ray Performance, 29 x 2.25", Addix Compound, tubeless ready, [R] Schwalbe Racing Ralph Performance, 29 x 2.25", Addix Compound, tubeless readyCranksetTruvativ Stylo C, 34T, Ai offsetBottom BracketSRAM DUB PF30 MTB83ChainSRAM X01 Eagle, 12-speedRear CogsSRAM XG-1295, XO1 Eagle, 10-52, 12-speedRear DerailleurSRAM X01 EagleShiftersSRAM XO Eagle, 12-speedHandlebarCannondale 1 Flat, Carbon, 31.8mm, 9° back, 760mmGripsESI Chunky Silicone, 32mm dia.StemCannondale 1, 7075 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 7°HeadsetIntegrated, 1-1/8 to 1.5", sealed angular contact bearings BrakesShimano XT hydraulic disc, 160/160mm XT rotorsBrake LeversShimano XT hydraulic discSaddlePrologo Dimension NDR, Tirox railsSeatpostCannondale 1, UD Carbon, 31.6 x 400mmSizesS, M, L, XLColourCarbon (CBR)ExtrasStash Kit (Fabric 8 in 1 Mini Tool and Dynaplug tubeless puncture repair tool)Suggested Retail PriceR 119,995.00 Scalpel Carbon 2 FrameAll-New, 100mm travel, BallisTec Carbon, Proportional Response Tuned, Flex Pivot Chainstay, PF30-83, Tapered Headtube, Speed Release 12mm thru axle, Ai Offset, Stash compatibleForkLefty Ocho, 100mm, Chamber Damper with remote lockout, OppO Spring System, tapered steerer, 55mm offsetRear ShockFox Float DPS Performance Elite EVOL, remote lockout , adjustable reboundRimsHollowGram 25, Superlight Hi-Impact Carbon, 28h, 25mm IW, tubeless readyHubs[F] Lefty 60 [R] DT Swiss, 12x148 SpokesHollowGram 2.0/1.8/2.0Tyres[F] Schwalbe Racing Ralph , 29 x 2.25", Snake Skin, Addix Speed Compound, tubeless ready, [R] Schwalbe Racing Ralph , 29 x 2.25", Snake Skin, Addix Speed Compound, tubeless readyCrankHollowGram, BB30a, OPI SpideRing, 34T, Ai offsetBottom BracketCannondale Alloy PressFit30ChainShimano XT, 12-speedRear CogsShimano XT, 10-51, 12-speedRear DerailleurShimano XTShiftersShimano XT, 12-speedHandlebarCannondale 2 Flat, butted 2014 Alloy, 31.8mm, 3° rise, 8° sweep, 760mmGripsESI Silicone 32mm GripsStemCannondale 1, 7075 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 7°HeadsetIntegrated, 1-1/8 to 1.5", sealed angular contact bearings BrakesShimano Deore XT M8100 hydraulic disc, 160mm XT rotorsBrake LeversShimano Deore XT M8100SaddlePrologo Dimension NDR, STN rails SeatpostCannondale 2, 7075 Alloy, 31.6 x 400mmSizesS, M, L, XLColourSlate Gray (SLT)ExtrasStash Kit (Fabric 8 in 1 Mini Tool and Dynaplug tubeless puncture repair tool)Claimed Weight (excluding Stash)10.71 kgTest Bike Weight (Large)10.95 kgSuggested Retail PriceR 99,995.00 Scalpel Carbon 3 FrameAll-New, 100mm travel, BallisTec Carbon, Proportional Response Tuned, FlexPivot Chainstay, PF30 -83, Tapered Headtube,Speed Release 12mm thru axle, Ai Offset, Stash compatibleForkLefty Ocho, 100mm, Chamber Damper with remote lockout, OppO Spring System, tapered steerer, 55mm offsetRear ShockFox Float DPS Performance Elite EVOL, remote lockout, adjustable reboundRimsStan's NoTubes Crest S1, 28h, tubeless readyHubs[F] Lefty 60 [R] Shimano MT510 12x148SpokesDT Swiss ChampionTyres[F] Schwalbe Racing Ralph Performance, 29 x 2.25", Addix Compound, tubeless ready, [R] Schwalbe Racing Ralph Performance, 29 x 2.25", Addix Compound, tubeless readyCrankHollowGram, BB30a, OPI SpideRing, 34T, Ai offsetBottom BracketCannondale Alloy PressFit30ChainShimano SLX, 12-speedRear CogsShimano SLX, 10-51, 12-speedRear DerailleurShimano XTShiftersShimano SLX, 12-speedHandlebarCannondale 2 Flat, butted 2014 Alloy, 31.8mm, 3° rise, 8° sweep, 760mm GripsESI Silicone 32mm Grips StemCannondale 3, 6061 Alloy, 31.8, 7°HeadsetIntegrated, 1-1/8 to 1.5", sealed angular contact bearings BrakesShimano Deore M6000 hydraulic disc, 160mm RT54 rotorsBrake LeversShimano Deore M6000 hydraulic discSaddlePrologo Dimension NDR, STN rails SeatpostCannondale 2, 7075 Alloy, 31.6 x 400mm SizesS, M, L, XLColourBlack (BLK)Claimed Weight (excluding Stash)11.76 kgSuggested Retail PriceR 74,995.00
  12. Cannondale lifted the lid on their all-new Scalpel cross-country race bike today. The latest Scalpel has a completely new suspension design, updated geometry, and has managed to shed those all-important grams. Click here to view the article
  13. Doing so will not be easy. They are up against a formidable field and the route, which may be the most challenging on equipment, in recent years. Manuel Fumic and Henrique Avancini have their sights firmly set on the yellow jersey. Photo by Shaun Roy As two of the most likeable and charismatic riders in the sport, Fumic and Avancini are crowd favourites. Their bid to win The Race That Measures All which has, thus far, eluded them will be closely followed by mountain bike fans from across the globe, but particular attention will come from South Africa, Germany and, of course, Avancini's native country, Brazil. "The mountain biking scene is growing fast in Brazil" the four-time Brazilian cross-country champion stated. "I can't explain all the reasons why Brazilians have so much passion for MTB. All I can say is that we have a special love for this sport." The proof of Brazil’s adoration of mountain biking is in the fact that there are 25 Brazilian teams registered to race the 2020 Absa Cape Epic; further to the physical commitment of these riders, Brazil contributed the second highest amount of views to the 2019 Live Broadcast. Turning his attention to fitting the world's premier mountain bike stage race within the confines of a busy Olympic year, the former Marathon World Champion added: "From my point of view, this race is one of the biggest for any mountain biker. I believe any top rider that starts the Absa Cape Epic needs to race it.” Cannondale Factory Racing will put their singletrack skill to good use on the testing 2020 Absa Cape Epic route. Photo by Nick Muzik. Avancini's thoughts on the matter are echoed by his partner, Fumic. "In recent years, South Africa in general, and Stellenbosch, in particular, have become the team base for our preparations" the German began. "We are happy to come back to participate in one of the biggest MTB events on the calendar. The Absa Cape Epic is the ultimate test.” "We have evolved over the years, achieved many stage victories and two overall podium finishes" Fumic pointed out. "We are coming back this year to finally get the yellow jersey and the overall victory." Cannondale Factory Racing’s training camp took place once again in South Africa over December 2019. The entire team, consisting of the riders, team manager, performance manager, technical coach, gym coach, mechanic, physio, and chef, spent 15 days reacquainting themselves with the terrain and the temperatures of the Western Cape, as well as testing equipment on routes similar to those raced in March. On one of their few days off, Avancini and Fumic joined Oliver Munnik and Craig Kolesky to film the Land Rover Technical Terrain for Stages 1 and 2, which will be released in the coming weeks. For Fumic, the senior partner in the team, 2020 will be his final tilt at the title. "2020 is my last season, after 20 years of racing" he clarified. "I have won many races in my career, but I am still missing the big win at the Absa Cape Epic. I am highly motivated and really looking forward to that last challenge with Henrique and my Cannondale Team." To do so, Cannondale Factory Racing will need to overcome the 2019 victors, SCOTT-SRAM MTB-Racing. Given the ferocious nature of their battles in Hermanus, Elgin and Stellenbosch in March 2019, mountain biking fans are eagerly awaiting the rematch between the Nino Schurter/Lars Forster combination and Fumic/Avancini. "Sure, Nino and Lars will be one of the teams to watch in 2020 and I like to have that kind of a rematch in my final year," Fumic said. "We had some good fights with them and it was close racing in 2019." Will Cannondale Factory Racing's 2020 Absa Cape Epic celebrations outdo those of 2019? Photo by Nick Muzik "I am excited to see Nino and Lars back in the race and have the chance to battle against them while riding with Fumic for one last time" Avancini concurred. "It's important to be on the same page as your partner, otherwise you can be more motivated about something than your partner is" Avancini advised. "This is related to everything in the race. To keep the emotional balance and ambitions on the same level is key to success." "The Absa Cape Epic is unpredictable though; it is wild and hard to win" Fumic reflected. Fans can be sure that the Cannondale Factory Racing team will once again ensure that the 2020 Race is an exciting one. Eight exhilarating stages of mountain biking action await and as Fumic said: “Anything can happen and that makes the Absa Cape Epic so unique. We can't wait…"
  14. In 2016 they finished fourth. In 2017 they finished fifth. In 2018 they stepped onto the podium, finishing third. In 2019 they went one better, earning the silver medal. The question for the 2020 Absa Cape Epic is if Cannondale Factory Racing can add the names "Manuel Fumic and Henrique Avancini" to the race's list of overall winners. Click here to view the article
  15. Press release: Cannondale SystemSix Cannondale today announced the launch of its newest road bike, the SystemSix. Designed as a complete speed system, this race-bred machine is the lowest-drag, most efficient, all-around fastest UCI-legal road bike on the market today. Not only the fastest in the wind-tunnel, not only the fastest for a select few riders in a select few scenarios, but the SystemSix is the fastest road bike for anyone interested in going faster anywhere. “SystemSix is the result of a ground up design where each element is optimized in pursuit of speed,” said Nathan Barry, Cannondale Design Engineer. “Aerodynamic drag is the single greatest resistive force that riders have to overcome so it is important to everyone, not just racers. SystemSix delivers more speed, to more riders, more of the time.” Downtube and seat tube shapes minimize the aero effect of bottles, because that’s how we ride. And multi-option mounts let you choose maximum aerodynamics or maximum hydration. The SystemSix is built on a six-part foundation – frame, fork, seatpost, bar, stem and wheels that all work together as a system. The disc-brake only design freed SystemSix from the constraints imposed by rim brakes, allowing engineers to achieve new levels of drag-reducing integration between the frame, fork and wheels. Precisely truncated airfoil profiles in the frame, fork and seatpost maintain airflow attachment across important yaw angles and minimize drag, while delivering world-class stiffness and ride feel. Completing the system are Cannondale’s new HollowGram KNØT64 wheels and KNØT SystemBar. The HollowGram KNØT64 wheels are engineered to combine the comfort and feel of larger volume tires with the aerodynamic efficiency of the fastest wheelsets in the world, while the KNØT SystemBar provides the low drag and sleek look of a one-piece bar and stem, with the adjustability and convenience of a two-piece system. With a full 8° of pitch adjust, as well as the ability to change stem length and bar width, it makes it easy to dial in the perfect position. The KNØT SystemBar is a slick bit of speed wizardry, providing the low drag and sleek look of a one-piece bar and stem, with the customizable adjustability of a two-piece system. The carbon bar features a full 8° of pitch adjust, so you can dial in your perfect position. And the rounded truncated airfoil shape of the flat section not only maintains consistent airflow throughout the pitch range, it’s also way comfier on your hands than other bars with sharp trailing edges. Fast and convenient Speed Release thru-axles and easy-to-service internal cable routing, the SystemSix is a full tilt, fully integrated road racing machine. Riders will climb faster, descend faster, sprint faster and draft easier on the all-new SystemSix. In addition to giving the bars a place to perch, the mating System Stem routes brake and Di2 lines cleanly into the headtube via a channel underneath a mechanic-friendly cover. And speaking of mechanic-friendly, shape- matched gated spacers allow you to easily adjust the stem’s stack height, without having to disconnect cables. Fast and easy, just how you like it. For full details on the science of speed, validation and test data on the fastest road bike in the world, see Cannondale’s whitepaper at Cannondale.com/SystemSix. The SystemSix line-up features four men’s models, in sizes 47, 51, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62 and one Women’s model, sizes 47, 51, 54. For more information on the new SystemSix, visit www.cannondale.com. Go Faster. Easier. SystemSix produces the least aerodynamic drag of any road bike on the market, which is a pretty big deal. Because of all the resistive forces your power has to overcome to make speed, aerodynamic drag is the big dog. Really big. Like, more important in most situations than all the other resistive forces (weight, rolling resistance, bearing friction, etc.) combined. And even in those few scenarios where it’s not THE most important thing, it’s still a really important thing. So cutting drag translates into more speed, with less effort, in all the places you’d expect. And a lot of places you wouldn’t. Faster Up. The SystemSix’s aerodynamic advantage makes it faster than a lightweight climbing bike, such as our gold standard SuperSix EVO, on any climb up to a 6% gradient or more, depending on rider’s power to weight. To put that in perspective, most revered HC climbs in the Tour only average 7-8%. Faster Down. Descending a 5% grade at 60 km/h (37 mph), a rider on a modern lightweight race bike, like an EVO, would need to expend over 300 watts to match a rider pedaling at a 200 watt recovery pace on a SystemSix. Meaning SystemSix riders can truly recover while making others suffer. Faster on the Flats. Compared to a modern, lightweight race bike like our SuperSix EVO, at 48 km/h (30 mph), SystemSix saves you over 50 watts — huge savings considering an average Cat 1 racer’s Functional Threshold Power is around 350 watts. And even when you’re drafting, you’re still getting up to 60% of that benefit. If you’re not up on watts, trust us, that’s more than enough to notice. Faster in the sprint. In a 200m sprint at 60 km/h (37 mph), all other things being equal, SystemSix will beat a modern lightweight race bike, like EVO, to the line by four full bike lengths. That’s no photo finish. Everyday faster. Even at an easy 30 km/h (18 mph) group ride pace, SystemSix requires about 10% less power to maintain speed than a lightweight race bike like SuperSix EVO, leaving you with more in the tank when it’s time to throw down. Optimized Against Every Aspect of Drag. Foiling Drag. Every section of the frame and fork features tailored airfoil profiles, with differing degrees of truncation designed to maintain flow attachment across important yaw angles to minimize drag. The Chine. The unique chine shape at the base of the headtube redirects air flow coming up the back of the fork leg, channeling it downstream. This prevents the fork’s airflow from mixing with the wake of the head tube and interrupting clean air over the fork crown. Sleek as Fork. Freed from the constraints of rim brakes, the fork crown area is radically different from traditional road bikes. Sleekly integrated with the frame for minimal drag. Larger opening for bigger tires and cleaner airflow. Asymmetric legs for handling disc brake loads. Geometry Models Note that not all the models and colours below will be available in South Africa. SystemSix Hi-MOD Dura-Ace Di2 FRAMESETALL-NEW SystemSix, BallisTec Hi-MOD CarbonGROUPShimano Dura-Ace Di2 Hydro Disc, 11-SpeedWHEELSETCannondale HollowGram KNØT64, CarbonCRANKSETCannondale HollowGram SiSL2 w/ Power2Max NG Eco Powermeter and Vision rings, 52/36COCKPITCannondale KNØT SystemBar, SystemSix Seatpost with Prologo Dimension NACK SaddleCOLORJet Black w/ Stealth Gray - Matte/Gloss (BBQ) SystemSix Hi-MOD Ultegra Di2 FRAMESETALL-NEW SystemSix, BallisTec Hi-MOD CarbonGROUPShimano Ultegra Di2 Hydro Disc, 11-SpeedWHEELSETCannondale HollowGram KNØT64, CarbonCRANKSETCannondale HollowGram Si w/ Power2Max NG Eco Powermeter and Vision rings, 52/36COCKPITCannondale KNØT SystemBar, SystemSix Seatpost with Prologo Dimension Tirox SaddleCOLORBlack Pearl w/ Sage Gray and Volt - Gloss (SGG) SystemSix Hi-MOD Dura-Ace Women’s FRAMESETALL-NEW SystemSix, BallisTec Hi-MOD CarbonGROUPShimano Dura-Ace Hydro Disc, 11-SpeedWHEELSETCannondale HollowGram KNØT64, CarbonCRANKSETCannondale HollowGram Si w/ Power2Max NG Eco Powermeter and Vision rings, 52/36COCKPITVision Metron 4D Flat UD Carbon, SystemSix Seatpost with Fabric Line Shallow Pro SaddleCOLORJet Black w/ Acid Strawberry and Stealth Gray - Satin (ASB) SystemSix Carbon Dura-Ace FRAMESETALL-NEW SystemSix, BallisTec CarbonGROUPShimano Dura-Ace Hydro Disc, 11-SpeedWHEELSETCannondale HollowGram KNØT64, CarbonCRANKSETCannondale HollowGram Si w/ SpideRing, 52/36COCKPITVision Metron 4D Flat UD Carbon, SystemSix Seatpost with Prologo Dimension Tirox SaddleCOLORVolt w/ Jet Black - Gloss (VLT) or Sealth Gray w/ Jet Black and Graphite - Gloss (SGY) SystemSix Carbon Ultegra FRAMESETALL-NEW SystemSix, BallisTec CarbonGROUPShimano Ultegra Hydro Disc, 11-SpeedWHEELSETFulcrum Racing 400 DBCRANKSETCannondale HollowGram Si w/ SpideRing, 52/36COCKPITVision Metron 4D Flat UD Carbon, SystemSix Seatpost with Prologo Dimension Tirox SaddleCOLORVulcan w/ Green Clay and Volt - Gloss (VUG) or Black Pearl w/ Acid Red and Meteor Gray - Gloss (ARD)
  16. Hi all I have in the past posted some photos in the Cannondale thread, but thought I'd add a little more detail here. My hope is to go under 5kgs by the end of the year. A little bit about me, I grew up in Cape Town and now live in London, so sourcing parts has been a little easier for this build, as eBay 2nd hand items have been great. Now, to the bike. The frame is a 2012 Supersix Evo HiMod. I had all the paint stripped by a custom paint shop in the UK. It was done by hand with sandpaper. Initially I planned on building this bike up mechanically, but I got a good deal on an eTAP group so went done the electronic road. The wheels are sub 1kg, along with sub 200gram tubs and 33gram(for the pair) skewers. The cassette is a SeqLite Alloy cassette weight just over 120grames, this means as a complete unit, the wheels are just over 1500grams. The bars are 3T ergonova 420mm nd weigh 193grams. The stem is a 3t Arx II in 130mm -17. I will be replacing the bar and stem with Bontrager's XXX Bar/Stem combo, which should save me around 100grams. Currently the bolts in the stem are hollow, and you can see through the center of them. I recently replaced the seatpost but have not yet trimmed it down so cannot comment on the weight. The sdalle is a Chinese copy of a Fizik Arione, but is pure carbon and weighs 115grams. the brakes are KCNC CB1, they were originally Zero Gravity Ti, but I was able to save around 30grams, and as this is a summer only bike, I can live with the braking quality (or lack there of) of the KCNC's Crank is a Cannondale SiSL2 50/34 and attached to that are Look Keo Blade Ti 20NM pedals. The bottle cage along witht he seatpost clamp and seatpost are all from a British lightweight tuning company called Mt.Zoom. The cage is 11grams and the seat clamp is 6 with a Ti bolt. I am on the hunt for the new style fork, as that will save around 50-60grams over my current one. Prior to the new seatpost, which Im hoping will save me around 20grams, the bike was sitting at 5.18kgs on the scales I do not have an up to date build list, but the build and progress can be viewed here: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=148290 I look forward to dragging this up all the hills I can find in CT at the end of the year, as I am home for Xmas. If anyone fancies a ride and a coffee, hit me up.
  17. Perhaps the most obvious change, aside from the looks is that the latest Habit iteration drops Cannondale’s signature Lefty in favour of a standard fork. While the frame might look a little more mainstream, Cannondale has packed in some interesting touches, most notably something they call “Proportional Response suspension design”. Through this approach, the engineers have tailored the kinematics to ensure riders across the size curve experience a consistent suspension feel. Where many bikes will have a single suspension design across all sizes, the Habit has unique pivot points per size to optimise the response. The Habit 2 frame that we tested features a BallisTec carbon front triangle with an alloy rear triangle. It provides 130mm of rear travel enabled by a Fox Float Performance Elite DPX2 EVOL shock (that’s a mouthful!) while upfront is a trusty 130mm Fox Float Performance Elite 34. A flip chip allows the rider to switch between 29” or 27.5+ wheels with clearance for up to 2.6” and 3.0” tyres on the respective wheel sizes (brand depending). Visually, the frame is a significant evolution on the departing Habit. The angular tubes and contemporary aesthetic are finished off with a unique, understated paint job and a touch of flair in the green anodised linkage. Cables are all routed internally via carbon tubing and yes, there is room for a water bottle mounted on the down tube. Specifications & local availability Before we get stuck in let's get some details out of the way when it comes to specifications and availability. Our demo bike was a close proxy for the stock Cannondale Habit 2, aside from the carbon wheel-set, tyres and rear derailleur, but is a higher spec build compared to what's currently available in our market. The Cannondale Habit Carbon 3 is available in South Africa as a complete build with the same frame in a stealthy 'Black Pearl' colour-way, SRAM Eagle GX/NX groupset, SRAM Guide R brakes, Stan's Arch rims and a lower specification Fox Float Performance DPS EVOL shock. Weight wise, it sneaks in just under 14kg and you can expect to pay around R 60 000 for the Habit Carbon 3.Specifications - as tested SizesS, M, L, XLFrameAll-New Habit, 130mm travel, BallisTec Carbon front triangle, SmartForm C1 Alloy swingarm, Proportional Response Tuned, Ai offset drivetrain, ISCG05, PF30, Post mount brake, tapered headtubeForkFox Float Performance Elite 34, 130mm, FIT4 Damper, 3-Pos adj., 15x110, tapered steerer, 51mm offsetShockFox Float Performance Elite DPX2 EVOL, 130mm, 3-Pos adj.HandlebarCannondale C3 Riser, Alloy, 15mm rise, 9° sweep, 4° rise, 780mmStemCannondale C1, 3D Forged 6061 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 0°SeatpostLyne Contour DropperSaddleFabric Scoop Shallow Elite, cro-mo railsShiftersSRAM GX Eagle, 12-speedRear DerailleurSRAM GX Eagle, 12-speedBrakesSRAM Guide RS hydro disc, 180/180mm Centerline rotorsBrake LeversSRAM Guide RS hydro discCassetteSRAM XG-1275, GX Eagle, 10-50, 12-speedChainSRAM GX Eagle, 12-speedCranksetTruvativ Stylo 7K, 30TBottom BracketCannondale Alloy PressFit30WheelsetZeroTwo CarbonTiresKenda Regolith Pro 29x2.4 On the trail Getting on the bike, I was immediately pretty comfortable. With long legs and a short torso, I’m on the cusp of sizing and although typically riding a large, I felt at home on a medium Habit. The frame gives a generous enough reach at 430mm on the medium frame and for a bike, in this class, the head angle is progressively slack at 66 degrees.Since all my go-to trails start with a long climb this was the first experience of the bike. The Habit is a capable climber, it pedals well in open mode and aside from a few test-driven sprint bursts, there wasn’t a need to lockout for any part of the climb. The position is comfortable and the steering response is suitably nimble for a trail bike. What goes up must come down and this is arguably what the Habit is biased towards. Tested on a variety of terrain from fast and flowing non-technical trails, to rocky and weather-beaten tracks with mild drops and boosts, the Habit was a joy. The bike is super responsive and feels snappy in and out of turns. The slack head angle, Fox Float 34 and grippy tyres work well in combination to soak up the bumps and guide you through rough terrain. While test bikes often take a few rides to get accustomed to, perhaps it was a bit of luck in the setup, or perhaps it was the geometry, but I was instantly comfortable and pushing the fun factor on the trails. As an avid stage racer and mildly competent trail rider, a bike like the Cannondale Habit excels in giving you that extra bit of control and comfort while providing good pedalling efficiency. Where on a typical 100mm marathon bike I’d be on the edge of control, or simply avoiding gnarlier trail features, the extra travel and relaxed geometry provide room for more confidence and more fun. Verdict All round the Habit is a genuinely well-balanced bike. It pedals well enough on the climbs and flats to get you to the trailhead. And when the trail narrows, gradient steepens or things get the right kind of twisty, it’s all about capability and fun. For a casual weekend ride at your home trail, a local Enduro or even a shorter, single-track heavy stage race, the Habit would be a blast. With a single water bottle in the frame, you’re not going to be blitzing through water points or spending uninterrupted hours in the saddle, but that's not the sort of thing you ought to make a habit of on this bike. Cannondale Habit Carbon 3 In case you missed the earlier note, currently you'll be able to get the Habit Carbon 3 in South Africa which does sport a lower spec than the build tested, but features the same frame and suspension platform with a decent component list.
  18. Bike Hub had the privilege of hopping over to Alpbach, Austria to spend a couple of days of learning all about the new bikes first hand from the Cannondale product and engineering team. And naturally, it included a good dose of riding the new bikes on some incredible alpine trails. 
Cannondale Habit Neo 2. The Habit NEO is the shorter travel version with 140mm front travel, 130mm rear travel and 29” wheels. The Neo takes some inspiration from the standard Habit which launched in 2018 in both looks and character. It is designed to be a versatile, fun and agile trail bike aimed at the less gnarly end of the trail riding spectrum. It's not afraid of some gnar though, with wide bars, a super short stem, grippy 2.6" tires, a dropper post and suitably sized rotors to bring things to a halt when required. Cannondale Moterra. Moterra SE. Although not likely to be available or in high demand in the South African market, the Moterra is the all-mountain oriented option with 160mm front and rear travel. And then there’s the Moterra SE with a 180mm RockShox Boxxer fork for those who want to kick it up a few notches. We set our sights on the Habit Neo which arguably best matches the demands of most South African mountain bike riders and the local terrain. Our test bike was the Cannondale Habit NEO 1 which sits at the top of the pecking order in specifications (and price), but more on that a little later. The Habit NEO is for those who want a more poppy, responsive and playful feeling bike who aren't totally descending oriented. We think the 130mm rear travel and 140mm in the front provides the best balance for that. Peter Vallance, Global Director of Product Management 
 The Frame and Geometry 

The front triangle is a full-carbon construction including a proprietary motor mount which neatly tucks it away keeping the drive unit low and forward. This keeps the centre of gravity low and allows for shorter chainstays for improved handling. While the frame is still light, as a general approach to the NEO package the Cannondale engineers favoured durability over gram-counting. The result is a frame that is confidently backed by a lifetime warranty. On the geometry side, the reach ranges from 42.5cm on the small to 49.5cm on the extra-large. The NEO’s headtube angle at 66.5 degrees is half a degree steeper than the standard Habit, but in the sensible range for a short-to-mid travel trail bike.
The chainstays at 45.5cm are reasonably short in e-bike terms and should keep the handling snappy. The Habit NEO is available in four frame sizes (S, M, L, XL) each of which uses what Cannondale call Proportional Response Suspension Technology which alters the shock layout per size to ensure the feel and performance is best matched to the rider. This approach takes into consideration the lower centre of gravity, overall weight and the extra power from the drive unit. Cannondale says this delivers exceptional grip in the climbs, superior braking performance on the descents and an all-round responsive, lively feel on the trail. The geometry chart - click to zoom in. Alloy rear end with offset drivetrain

The rear triangle is constructed from alloy with an asymmetric (offset) drivetrain which means there’s more room for bigger tires while, again, chainstay length is kept in check.
 Motor protection

Cannondale opted for an alloy skid plate below the frame to guard the all-important (and expensive) motor against inevitable bashing on the trail. On the side, a plastic cover to protects the motor from debris and impacts.
 Proportional response

Each frame size has unique shock links and pivot placement to align kinematics with the rider. Water bottles (and batteries) included

Don’t think an engine means you won’t need to hydrate - the frame accommodates a decent sized water bottle. The drive unit
 Both the Habit NEO and Moterra are driven by the new Bosch Performance CX system. Bosch released a new range of drive systems earlier this year were able to shrink the motor to around half the size of its predecessor and shed nearly 3kg. The top two models feature the Bosch PowerTube 625Wh battery, while the lower models are equipped with the 500Wh version.
A new “eMTB” mode dynamically matches the assistance to the rider’s output (from 140% up to 340%) which means you shouldn’t need to worry about changing modes mid trail. In the standard modes, Eco will give you a steady 60% assistance, Tour gives 140% assistance and Turbo gives 340%. Regardless of mode, the system will only give assistance up to 25km/h. 
 
 First impressions While I’m by no means an e-mountain bike hater, I’ve been in the camp adopting the “they’re great fun, but not quite as agile/playful/capable as my standard bike” view. Having ridden various iterations of e-bikes there always seemed to be one or more limiting factors. Either the motor response wasn’t great (too slow or unpredictable), or the bike felt cumbersome on the descents and twisty trails or it simply just didn’t look great. Although some brands are changing those perceptions with more recent iterations, it’s still the pervading view among many e-bike doubters.With the glowing promise of the marketing materials and genuine enthusiasm from the team behind it, I was eager to give the Habit NEO an open-minded test run. Before even getting on the bike, Cannondale had already addressed a common e-bike complaint: the looks. The Habit NEO gives a great first impression and thanks to its clean lines, neat integration and attractive colour-ways it’s a good looking bike, never mind e-bike. On the bike Before we set off we all settled onto our allocated bikes, tweaking saddle height, pressures and performing the obligatory parking lot test. You can't ask for more than having your suspension set up done personally by the Habit and Habit NEO's Frame Design Engineer and suspension wizard, Luis “El Kinematico“ Arraiz.From the get-go, we hit an early climb, first tar and then gravel. It was a good opportunity to get acquainted with the Habit NEO and under the guidance of none other than enduro legend Jérôme Clementz, we duly set our bikes to eMTB mode. In this setting, the assistance is responsive to rider input while still smooth and predictable. On long, non-technical climbs a steady pedalling action and cadence of 70rpm or more is rewarded. Any lazy pedal-stomping and the dynamic assistance became over-active. But on more technical climbs with more erratic power output across varied terrain, that extra kick comes into its own, nudging you up and over root steps or rocky sections. After around 500m of steady climbing on relatively smooth surfaces, we’d reached the summit and prepared to head downwards onto the trails. The first climb was a low effort, chatty affair, but even in the variable eMTB mode the level of assistance was restrained enough to get the lungs working, blood pumping and warm up stale legs. Although comfortable on the Habit NEO I was apprehensive. It was still a new bike, an e-bike, and not to mention the steep alpine trails lying in wait. Attempting to follow Jérôme Clementz from the outset was definitely unwise, but the bike kept well-composed and saved me from myself on a few occasions. While he quickly disappeared I backed off to get a better feel for the bike (and trails) and build confidence. After a few sections, I quickly got a feel for how to use the weight of the bike and immense grip to my advantage. Despite carrying a few extra kilos the bike has a very nimble, responsive feel and once I'd loosened the death drip I began to throw it around, using the weight into corners and the extra kick from the motor to power out and quickly regain speed. On some eye-poppingly steep sections, bashing through roots and ruts the bike was composed and the 140mm Pike provided great support for both the expected and unexpected hits. My initial apprehension was quickly abated and it was time to play. Where an e-bike in this category comes into its own is with ability to quickly get you back up to allow "sessioning" of complete trails or specific sections. On one particular piece of trail which was both fun and challenging I charged back up the hill three times just to have another run down. Now wanting to test the modes and battery we whacked on Turbo mode and powered back up the hill. The boost from this mode is obvious, but if anything I just found myself pedalling harder in response and at 20km/h at 250 watts (human power) I was gleefully racing back to the trail head. Only at the top did I realise the need to regroup and lower the heart rate. I enjoy climbing, but sans the electric assist there's just no way that third or fourth session would have happened. Without any hard numbers to back it up, overall confident I worked harder in climbing and descending while getting more opportunities to have fun and hone in my trail craft than I would have done on an analogue bike. Is that cheating? Whatever you choose to call it I'm okay with it. Where do I sign up? On the all-important topic of range, after two and half hours of riding, 23.2km, 1455m ascent, 1452m descent and 1653 calories spent the battery was sitting at 26%. And that after trashing numerous climbs in Turbo party in an effort to see who in our group could get the lowest battery reading upon our return, without running out of course. Range will vary based on the terrain, the chosen modes and your riding style, so while flatter routes and more economical modes might get you up to 100km, big climbs and more assistance will of course reduce the range dramatically. In our case, I'm not sure my body would have outlasted the battery though. E-volution or revolution?Whether you’re sitting on the left or right of the e-bike debate, it might be time to forget everything you think you know or feel about e-bikes. There’s an emerging generation of e-mountain bikes which might just redefine the trail bike category as a whole. I might be a bit buzzed from the fresh alpine air and overdosed on trail stoke, but perhaps there’s an argument to be made that trail e-bikes will take mountain biking back to where it began. A bunch of friends, misfits and adventure seekers looking to simply have fun on a bicycle. That's not to say e-mountain biking or the Habit NEO is for everyone. If your ideal mountain biking is clocking miles, scrutinising power meter readings or feats of ultra-endurance it's probably not going to tick your boxes. Equally if you are gravity inclined on a non-electric bike of 140mm or more you might just be more at home on the Moterra. And there is the not so small issue of cost. Motors, batteries and a carbon dual-suspension mountain bike all do come with a price tag that unfortunately won't be for everyone. If you're sitting on or anywhere near the fence, give one a try, you will be surprised. Cannondale Habit Neo Models
Back to business then, below is a run down of Habit Neo models earmarked for South Africa. Local recommended retail pricing has yet to be determined, but as an indicator we've included Euro pricing. 
 Cannondale Habit Neo 1

 Frame130mm travel, BallisTec Carbon Front Triangle, SmartForm C1 Alloy Swingarm, Proportional Response Tuned Suspension, removable downtube battery, alloy skid plate, Ai offset drivetrain, internal cable routing, 148x12mm thru-axle, post mount brake, tapered headtubeForkRockShox Pike Select + RC, 140mm, DebonAir, 15x110mm tapered steerer, 51mm offsetRear ShockRockShox Deluxe Ultimate RT, DebonAirDrive UnitBosch Performance Line CX 250WBatteryBosch PowerTube, 625WhDisplayBosch KioxChargerBosch 4aRimsStan's NoTubes Flow MK3, 32h, tubeless readyHubs(F) Formula DC-511, 15x100 ® SRAM 746, 12x148SpokesDT Swiss ChampionTyresMaxxis Rekon, 29 x 2.6", 3C compound, EXO, tubeless readyCrankBosch Gen4 w/ custom Ai offset, 34TChainSRAM NX Eagle, 12-speedRear CogsSRAM PG-1230, NX Eagle, 11-50, 12-speedRear DerailleurSRAM X01 EagleShiftersSRAM GX Eagle, 12-speedHandlebarCannondale 1 Riser, Carbon, 15mm rise, 9° sweep, 4° rise, 780mmGripsFabric Funguy Locking GripsStemCannondale 1, 3D Forged 6061 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 7°HeadsetIntegrated Sealed Bearing, TaperedBrakesMagura MT7 Trail hydro disc, (F) 4-piston / ® 2-piston, 220/203mm Spider rotorsBrake LeversMagura MT7 Trail HC hydro discSaddleFabric Scoop Shallow Elite, cro-mo railsSeatpostCannondale DownLow Dropper Post, internal routing, 31.6, 100mm (S), 125mm (M), 150mm (L-XL)SizesS, M, L, XLEuropean Pricing€ 7,999ExtrasLights - Supernova M99 Mini Pro Cannondale Habit Neo 2
 Frame130mm travel, BallisTec Carbon Front Triangle, SmartForm C1 Alloy Swingarm, Proportional Response Tuned Suspension, removable downtube battery, alloy skid plate, Ai offset drivetrain, internal cable routing, 148x12mm thru-axle, post mount brake, tapered headtubeForkRockShox 35 Gold RL, 140mm, DebonAir, 15x110, tapered steerer, 51mm offsetRear ShockRockShox Deluxe Select+ RT, DebonAirDrive UnitBosch Performance Line CX 250WBatteryBosch PowerTube, 625WhDisplayBosch KioxChargerBosch 4aRimsStan's NoTubes Flow S1, 32h, tubeless readyHubs(F) Formula DC-511, 15x100 ® SRAM 746, 12x148SpokesDT Swiss ChampionTyresMaxxis Rekon, 29 x 2.6", 3C compound, EXO, tubeless readyCrankBosch Gen4 w/ custom Ai offset, 34TChainSRAM NX Eagle, 12-speedRear CogsSRAM PG-1230, NX Eagle, 11-50, 12-speedRear DerailleurSRAM GX EagleShiftersSRAM NX Eagle, 12-speedHandlebarCannondale 3 Riser, 6061 Alloy, 15mm rise, 8° sweep, 4° rise, 780mmGripsCannondale Locking GripsStemCannondale 1, 3D Forged 6061 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 7°HeadsetIntegrated Sealed Bearing, TaperedBrakesMagura MT5 Trail hydro disc, (F) 4-piston / ® 2-piston, 220/203mm Spider rotorsBrake LeversMagura MT5 Trail HC hydro discSaddleFabric Scoop Shallow Elite, cro-mo railsSeatpostCannondale DownLow Dropper, internal routing, 31.6, 100mm (S), 125mm (M), 150mm (L/XL)SizesS, M, L, XLEuropean Pricing€ 5,999 
 Cannondale Habit Neo 3
 
 Frame130mm travel, BallisTec Carbon Front Triangle, SmartForm C1 Alloy Swingarm, Proportional Response Tuned Suspension, removable downtube battery, alloy skid plate, Ai offset drivetrain, internal cable routing, 148x12mm thru-axle, post mount brake, tapered headtubeForkRockShox 35 Gold RL, 140mm, DebonAir, 15x110, tapered steerer, 51mm offsetRear ShockRockShox Deluxe Select R, DebonAirDrive UnitBosch Performance Line CX 250WBatteryBosch PowerTube 500WhDisplayBosch PurionChargerBosch 4aRimsWTB ST i29 TCS, 32h, tubeless readyHubs(F) Formula DC-511, 15x100 ® SRAM 746, 12x148SpokesDT Swiss ChampionTyresMaxxis Rekon, 29 x 2.6", 3C compound, EXO, tubeless readyCrankBosch Gen4 w/ custom Ai offset, 34TChainSRAM SX Eagle, 12-speedRear CogsSRAM PG-1210, SX Eagle, 11-50, 12-speedRear DerailleurSRAM NX EagleShiftersSRAM SX Eagle, 12-speedHandlebarCannondale 3 Riser, 6061 Alloy, 15mm rise, 8° sweep, 4° rise, 780mmGripsFabric Funguy Locking GripsStemCannondale 1, 3D Forged 6061 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 7°HeadsetIntegrated Sealed Bearing, TaperedBrakesMagura MT30 Trail hydro disc, 220/203mm Spider rotorsBrake LeversMagura MT30 Trail hydro discSaddleFabric Scoop Shallow Sport, steel railsSeatpostTranzX dropper, internal routing, 31.6, 80mm (XS), 100mm (S), 120mm (M), 130mm (L-XL)SizesS, M, L, XLEuropean Pricing€ 4,999 Cannondale Habit Neo 4
 
 Frame130mm travel, BallisTec Carbon Front Triangle, SmartForm C1 Alloy Swingarm, Proportional Response Tuned Suspension, removable downtube battery, alloy skid plate, Ai offset drivetrain, internal cable routing, 148x12mm thru-axle, post mount brake, tapered headtubeForkRockShox Recon RL, 140mm, Solo Air, 15x110, tapered steerer, 51mm offsetRear ShockRockShox Deluxe Select R, DebonAirDrive UnitBosch Performance Line CX 250WBatteryBosch PowerTube 500WhDisplayBosch PurionChargerBosch 4aRimsWTB STX i29 TCS, 32h, tubeless readyHubs(F) Formula DC-511, 15x100 ® Formula DC-1248, 12x148SpokesDT Swiss ChampionTyresMaxxis Rekon, 29 x 2.6", EXO, tubeless readyCrankBosch Gen4 w/ custom Ai offset, 34TChainSRAM SX Eagle, 12-speedRear CogsSRAM PG-1210, SX Eagle, 11-50, 12-speedRear DerailleurSRAM SX EagleShiftersSRAM SX Eagle, 12-speedHandlebarCannondale 3 Riser, 6061 Alloy, 15mm rise, 8° sweep, 4° rise, 780mmGripsFabric Funguy Locking GripsStemCannondale 3, 3D Forged 6061 Alloy, 1-1/8", 31.8, 0-degreeHeadsetIntegrated Sealed Bearing, TaperedBrakesSRAM Level T hydro disc, 200/200mm Centerline rotorsBrake LeversSRAM Level T hydro discSaddleFabric Scoop Shallow Sport, steel railsSeatpostTranzX dropper, internal routing, 31.6, 80mm (XS), 100mm (S), 120mm (M), 130mm (L-XL)SizesS, M, L, XLEuropean Pricing€ 4,499 Enough talking - watch the video
  19. Aerodynamic efficiency has a huge affect on speed and performance in cycling, so reducing drag on the new SuperSix EVO was a priority. But it was equally important that the new bike retain the light weight, responsiveness and composed ride that made the previous iterations so successful. Nathan Barry, Cannondale Design Engineer To balance the competing demands of light weight and aerodynamics, the new SuperSix EVO utilizes a new family of highly truncated airfoil tube shapes that greatly reduce drag, while delivering equal or better weight, stiffness and ride feel than the former frame. These fast tube shapes are a key part of the sleek system-integrated design, where the frame, fork, seatpost, bar, stem and wheels are engineered to work together for optimal performance. It all adds up to a bike that will save a rider a full 30 watts of power at 48 km/h (30 mph) over the previous version, making it the fastest of the lightweight road bikes currently available. The frame features highly truncated airfoil tube shapes that offer the same weight, and equal or better stiffness, than round tubes, but reduce drag by up to 30%. Hidden Cable Routing On the disc versions, brake lines route through an opening in the front of the headtube for minimal drag and headache-free serviceability. Clearly Capable The new frame design has clearance for some seriously big rubber. The disc versions will fit 30mm tires with tons of clearance, for extra comfort and capability on any kind of road. Key BenefitsLess Drag. More Speed. 30 watts. That's how much power the drag- reducing tube shapes and integrated design of the new SuperSix EVO saves over the prior version at 30 mph (48.3 km/h). Fast just got faster. Feel the Light. The lightest disc brake road frameset that Cannondale has ever made. The new SuperSix EVO is ready to throw down when the grade goes up. Swift and Sure. Racy geometry and stiffness for explosive speed. Better micro-suspension and big tyre clearance for surprising smoothness. It all adds up to precise handling and a ride-feel that’s out of sight. For more details and testing data on the SuperSix EVO see Cannondale’s Take Flight Technical Paper at Cannondale.com/SuperSixEVO. SuperSix EVO Technology Since its inception, SuperSix EVO has been known for its elegantly smooth ride quality, and the new one is even smoother. The new SAVE rear stays, integrated binder and 27 KNØT seat post increase compliance by up to 18%. The frame has space to run 30mm tires with plenty of clearance, and the new SAVE bar offers bump absorbing deflection and less aero drag, for more comfort, control and speed over less than perfect road surfaces. SuperSix EVO has always been known for its elegantly smooth ride quality, and the new one is even smoother. The new SAVE rear stays, integrated binder and KNØT 27 seat post increase compliance by 18%. HollowGram SAVE SystemBar Thin bar profile absorbs shock and reduces drag for better comfort and speed. Two-piece design allows interchangeability and 8° of pitch adjustment to perfectly fine-tune rider position. HollowGram 45 KNØT Wheels An evolution of our wide, ultra-fast, low-drag rim profile with a light, versatile 45mm depth. Maintains high aerodynamic efficiency even with big tires. The HollowGram 45 KNØT Wheels are an evolution of Cannondale’s wide, low-drag rim profile, with a light, versatile 45mm depth. They are one of the fastest all-around race wheelsets in the world, and they maintain exceptional aerodynamic efficiency even with big tires, opening up possibilities for more speed in more places than ever. The SuperSix EVO also offers riders a new way to connect with their bike and the ride experience. Cannondale connected technology seamlessly pairs an integrated wheel sensor with the new Cannondale App to deliver hyper-accurate speed, route and distance info, as well as provide curated information about their bike, send detailed service reminders and more all through their smartphone. With thoughtful details like ready-to-activate Power2Max power meters, fast and convenient Speed Release thru-axles and easy-to-service internal cable routing, the SuperSix EVO is a pure road bike through and through, and it’s ready to fly. The disc versions feature Speed Release thru-axles for faster, easier wheel changes. Compatible with most standard thru-axle wheelsets. Connected. An integrated wheel sensor delivers hyper accurate speed, route and distance info, registers your bike, reminds you of needed service and more, all through the free Cannondale App. Power2Max Power Meter. Light, accurate and reliable Power2Max spider-based power meters are included on some models. Turn it on with a one-time activation fee and start getting faster. It's power made easy. SuperSix EVO Geometry Model selection in South Africa: SuperSix EVO Hi-Mod Disc Dura Ace (Agave) SuperSix EVO Carbon Disc Ultegra (BBQ) SuperSix EVO Carbon Ultegra (Black Pearl) SuperSix EVO Carbon 105 (BBQ)
  20. Henrique Avancini's Cannondale Scalpel Si FrameCannondale Scalpel SiForkLefty OchoShockFox Float DPS FactoryRimsEnve M525Rear HubDT Swiss 240sFront HubLeftyFront TyreSchwalbe Racing RalphRear TyreSchwalbe Thunder BurtHandlebarEnve M6 730mmStemEnve 90mm 6 degreeSeatpostKS Lev CiSaddleProlog Scratch X8 NACKBrakesShimano XTR M9100RotorsShimano RT 81 160mmShifterShimano XTR Rear derailleurShimano XTR CassetteShimano XTR 51-10TCrank armsShimano XTR with Stages powermeterChainShimano XTRChainringShimano XTR 36TPedalsShimanoBottle cagesCannondale carbonStorageSchwalbe saddle bagWeight11.2 kg Being a Cannondale cross-country race bike, Avancini's bike boasts the distinctive Lefty Ocho fork. The rear suspension is powered by a golden-brown Fox Float DPS Factory shock with the lockout controlled by a remote lever. The Cannondale Factory Racing team has been supported by Shimano for a number of years and it's no surprise to see them racing with the company's latest XTR drivetrain and brakes. Avancini paired the 51-10 tooth cassette with a 36 tooth chainring. There is a neat Shimano chain guide to keep the chain in check. The team's riders measure their power outputs via a Stages power meter attached to the non-drive side crankarm. A SahmuraiSword tyre plug end cap is also wedged into the crank axle hollow. Avancini's wheels feature Enve's M525 carbon cross-country race rim. The rear hub is a lightweight DT Swiss 240s with a Lefty specific hub on the front wheel. The team ride on Schwalbe rubber with the combination of a Racing Ralph on the front and Thunder Burt for the rear wheel. The handlebar and stem is a carbon pairing from Enve with an M6 730mm bar and a 90mm stem, which appears to come from their road product catalogue. The seat post is a KS Lev Ci with its carbon seat mast (which we also say on Ariane Lüthi's bike). Mounted to the seat post is a Prologo Scratch X8 NACK saddle. An interesting personal touch for Avancini is a cable tie placed around the axle on the inside of the Shimano clipless mechanism to reduce float for the rider. Avancini's Scalpel weighed 11.2 kilograms which is fairly light for a race-ready Cape Epic bike.
  21. I know it is late in the day, but it doesn’t hurt to try! My husband and I are looking to rent a Cannondale Road Tandem s/m road bike to use for the Argus (Cape Town Cycle Tour). We train at home (Namibia) on a 29’er Cannondale MTB but want to avoid traveling with the bike. Any leads would be appreciated. Thanks
  22. Hi guys, Help on this would be greatly appreciated! I am a roadie looking to dabble in some mtbing - in my long search for a mtb within my price range - the options have been narrowed down to the 'Cannondale Scalpel-SI 6' and the 'Merida Ninety-Six 600'. I would really appreciate the hubs advice on both these bikes. Below is the low down on each bike (apologies for adding in ALL the detail, just have no clue what's important to look at and what isn't): Cannondale: FRAME: Scalpel-Si, 100mm, SmartForm C1 Alloy, Zero Pivot seatstay, Carbon Link, PF30, 1.5 Si head tube, Ai Offset FORK: RockShox Reba RL, 100mm, Solo Air, Tapered Steerer, Maxle Lite, 51mm offset REAR SHOCK: RockShox Monarch RL, 100mm RIMS: Stan's NoTubes Crest S1, 32 hole, tubeless ready HUBS: Formula DC51 front, Formula DHT-142x12, (Ai Offset dish - Rear) SPOKES: DT-Swiss Champion (Ai Offset dish - Rear) TIRES: WTB Nineline Comp 29x2.25" DNA Compound. PEDALS: Not included CRANK: Cannondale Si, BB30, 36/26 CNC Rings BOTTOM BRACKET: Cannondale Alloy PressFit30 CHAIN: KMC X11, 11-speed REAR COGS: SunRace, 11-40, 11-speed FRONT DERAILLEUR: Shimano SLX, side swing REAR DERAILLEUR: Shimano XT Shadow Plus, 11-speed SHIFTERS: Shimano SLX , 1x11-speed HANDLEBAR: Cannondale C3 flat, Butted AL6061 Alloy, 760mm GRIPS: Cannondale Locking Grips STEM: Cannondale C3, 6061 Alloy, 1.125", 31.8, -5° HEADSET: Cannondale HeadShok Si BRAKES: Shimano Deore MT500 hydro disc, 180/160mm BRAKE LEVERS: Shimano Deore MT500 hydro disc SADDLE: Cannondale Stage 3 SEATPOST: Cannondale C3, 6061 alloy, 31.6x350mm (S,M) 400mm (L,X) SIZES: M,L,XL (29") Merida: FRAME NINETY-SIX LITE 96mm suspension travel FRAME SIZE M, L, XL COLOR GLOSSY BLACK ((BLUE/SILVER)) FORK Manitou Markhor Comp SHOCK Rock Shox Monarch RL BRAKE FRONT Shimano MT-500 BRAKE REAR Shimano MT-500 BRAKE LEVER Shimano MT-500 HEADSET FSA NO.55E HANDLEBAR MERIDA Expert CC HANDLEBAR STEM MERIDA Expert CC GRIP MERIDA Comp EC DERAILLEUR FRONT no DERAILLEUR REAR Sram NX Eagle SHIFTER FRONT no SHIFTER REAR Sram NX Eagle SEAT POST MERIDA Comp CC SEAT CLAMP MERIDA Expert SADDLE MERIDA Comp CC CHAIN Sram NX Eagle CHAINWHEEL Sram NX Eagle 32 teeth FREEWHEEL Sram NX 1230 Eagle 11-50 teeth 12 speed BOTTOM BRAKET Sram BB DUB PF MTB 92 RIM MERIDA Comp CC TIRE FRONT Maxxis Ikon TIRE REAR Maxxis Ikon HUB FRONT Shimano MT400-B HUB REAR Shimano MT400-B AXLE REAR JD-QR48R Boost axle 12x148mm ROTOR FRONT Shimano RT10 ROTOR REAR Shimano RT10 SPOKES Double Butted Black stainless WEIGHT 13.13 kg
  23. What’s the difference? According to them, it meant fewer tradeoffs in terms of feel and handling compared to what you’d typically expect in an aero bike. Just how fast is it? We were keen to find out. SystemSix is a name ardent Cannondale fans will be familiar with from the mid-2000’s era hybrid carbon / alloy road bike which carried the same name. While the earlier edition was revolutionary in its day, the new SystemSix boasts some of the latest advancements in carbon construction and aerodynamics which define high-performance road bike design. The “Six” in the model name refers to the six unique elements the Cannondale team focussed on in delivering the SystemSix. Those are the frame, fork, seat post, stem, handlebar, and wheels. Upon the release of this new model, Cannondale engineers treated the cycling media and tech-hungry fans to a forty-eight page white paper detailing the design approach, performance and a healthy dose of science to back up their claims. Graph depicting the 6% tipping point before which aero beats weight weenie. Source: Cannondale white paper The frame and fork are noticeably aero shaped, as one would expect from a system that was moulded through computer simulations and real-world wind tunnel testing. All that extra carbon does add up, and like most aero bikes, the SystemSix does carry some extra grams. Here though is where the Cannondale engineers employ some science to show that for most of us in everyday riding conditions the aerodynamic savings will typically outweigh any weight penalties. They reckon that tipping point is at 6% gradient after which the extra weight on the SystemSix vs. the SuperSix Evo would mean the Evo is the better choice for extended, steeper climbs. While I’m the sort of rider who typically leans away from “aero” in favour of a lighter, normal road bike, you’ve got to ask yourself, how often do you ride upwards of 6% for any meaningful period?The geometry on the SystemSix was designed to be inline with Cannondale’s top-end road range like the SuperSix. The designers wanted it to feel like a “normal” bike, and importantly to be familiar for existing Cannondale riders, delivering a similar feel on the road with all the aero advantages. It has a race-oriented cockpit, with a low stack to offer an aggressive long and low posture. Specifications (as tested) FrameALL-NEW SystemSix, BallisTec Carbon, Di2 ready, SAVE, BB30a, flat mount, Speed Release thru-axleForkALL-NEW SystemSix, BallisTec Carbon, Speed Release thru-axleHeadsetTapered, 1-1/8" upper, 1-1/4" lower bearingBottom bracketCannondale Alloy PressFit30CranksetCannondale HollowGram Si, BB30a w/ OPI SpideRing, 52/36StemVision Trimax OS, 2014 Alloy, 3D ForgedSeatpostCannondale KNØT Carbon, 330mmGripsPrologo One TouchHandlebarVision Metron 4D Flat, UD CarbonFront derailleurShimano Ultegra, braze-onRear derailleurShimano Ultegra GSBrakesShimano Ultegra hydro disc, 160/140mm RT81 rotorsShiftersShimano Ultegra hydro disc, 2x11SaddlePrologo Dimension, Tirox railsSpokesFulcrum double-butted, Stainless, BladedHubsFulcrum Racing 400 DB, 12x100 front, 12x142 rearRimsFulcrum Racing 400 DB, Alloy clincher, 35mm deepChainShimano 105, 11-speedCassetteShimano 105, 11-30, 11-speedTyresVittoria Rubino Pro Speed, 700 x 26mm (23c)Weight8.44kg (incl. pedals & bottle cage), 8.15kg out of the boxPriceR 65 000 We tested the entry model in the SystemSix range, the Cannondale SystemSix Carbon Ultegra. Within the SystemSix line up, the entry point is arguably is on the upper end of mid-level in terms of specification and price point. The lower price does mean that this model forgoes some of the aero touches which define the SystemSix. Instead of the Cannondale Knot SystemBar this model arrives with a standard Vision alloy stem, complete with an aero front cover and Vision aero bars. In place of the Knot Carbon Wheels the Ultegra model sports 35 mm deep Fulcrum alloy wheels. Although these do mean some components in the “system” are not fully optimised, both are expected components at the entry to mid-level, and in line with what the majority of aero competitors offer at a similar price point. Although out of the box the high spacer stack makes the bike look at bit ungainly, once dropped down (and with the steerer chopped), I have to say it doesn’t look all that bad. Although the fully integrated stem on the high-end model does completely hide gear cabling at the junction of the handlebar and stem, with some trimming of housing lengths the standard stem setup has the potential to look neat.In order to safely route the disc brake hoses through the frame, Cannondale has implemented a “stopper” on the steerer which limits the range of motion to 50 degrees left or right. This prevents damage to the hoses due to over-extension. Although in my head I thought this could be an issue on the road, in the real world there aren’t any situations I encountered where you need more range than what the SystemSix offers. As an example, I could comfortably execute a sharp U-turn in a single lane without hitting the stoppers. On the bike On the road, the Cannondale SystemSix does indeed feel fast. To be fair, you would say the same about most high-end aero road bikes these days, but after a couple of rides on the SystemSix, I was impressed with the balance of speed, comfort and handling. The expectation with an aero bike is that it will offer a harsh ride and skittish handling. While the SystemSix is an unmistakably stiff frame, the ride is firm as opposed to bone chattering. The handling is good and steering is precise.I found my happy place in the drops on the SystemSix. For once the setup along with the Prologo saddle and shallow drop bar ticked all my comfort boxes, but mostly it was about the feel. In the drops, you get a yearning sense of "go fast" from the bike and in this position I found the handling to be most confident. Whether just the euphoria of a new bike or a little too much of the marketing kool-aid, out on windy Cape rides I found myself reeling in (and leaving for dead) countless lonely stragglers losing the battle with fierce headwinds. ProsIt’s fast! Skips most of the aero bike handling foibles Offers a smooth, relatively comfortable ride within this category ConsNot a natural climber when out of the saddle
  24. In case you missed the news, or just need a refresher, here are the feature highlights for the new Lefty Ocho: Single crown: The most obvious change is the new single crown design. Doing away with the double crown arrangement sees Cannondale employ a standard 1-1/8” tapered steerer for greater compatibility. Weight reductions: The simpler structure reduces the leg length and removes the need for brackets, reducing weight by up to 250 grams. Improved internals: Internally the Lefty has also undergone changes. There is a new Chamber damper and Delta Cage needle bearing assembly said to improve suppleness and reliability. Updated remote lockout: The previous hydraulic dual fork and shock lockout is replaced with a simpler cable operated system. "Stop Lock" brake mount: There is also a convenient new brake release mechanism that requires a single turn of a hex key and a push of a button to release the front wheel. Our first impressions We managed to get our hands on a new Lefty Ocho for a few test rides to see what all the fuss is about. Meeting the Ocho for the first time most striking change is the visual. Dropping the dual crown in favour of single crown gives the new Lefty a sleek and slender appearance, far more refined than its now somewhat industrial looking predecessor.It’s not all about looks though. The Ocho hit the market with some big claims around being the smoothest and stiffest lightweight cross-country fork. Just how smooth and stiff is it? Having ridden the Lefty 2.0 for some time earlier this year, along with the primary two-legged lightweight competitors since, I was curious to see if it was as good as the marketing suggests. With just two outings the get a feel for the Ocho, this is very much a first impression take. First impressions are good though. Within the realm light cross country “forks” the Ocho is stiff and provides a super smooth and predictable feel across a range of trail conditions. It is noticeably smooth over small and large bumps, dare I say best in class, but without back-to-back tests and some pseudoscience I’ll steer away from a definitive result on this point. Other smart touches like the standard tapered steerer tube, an easy one-bolt quick release for the front wheel and a reliable cable actuated lockout lever make for a refined package which is more readily compatible. From the press release: Suspension is movement. The smoother it can move, the better it can do its job. Insulating you from impacts. Floating through the chop. Tracking over the things that would throw you off. Delivering you where you want to go. When it comes to smoothness, Ocho stands alone. Fewer friction-causing bushings and seals than any other fork. The supple new Chamber damper. And the new Delta Cage evolution of Lefty’s revolutionary needle bearing telescope assembly. It all adds up to the smoothest fork ever made. No sticking, no binding, no shuddering or hesitation, no matter how hard you push it. Just pure, smooth action always, for ultimate control. Cannondale Lefty Ocho has the best overall stiffness of any lightweight XC fork, which is great. But what separates it from the rest is not so much how stiff it is, but rather how it is stiff. Because stiffness, like so many things, is a double-edged sword: Too flexy and you’ve got a noodle that won’t go where it’s told. Too stiff, or stiff in the wrong places, and it wants to ricochet and bounce, instead of float and flow. Ocho’s unique single-crown design, and triangle-in-triangle telescope, give us unprecedented ability to tailor the stiffness of the fork. For the stiffness to go, and the give to flow. Cannondale A deeper look at the details.The world’s first single crown, single-sided suspension fork, for singularly impressive performance. Normal tapered 1-1/2” to 1-1/8” steerer. Lighter. Simpler. Standard. Simple, reliable cable remote lever engages lockout on the fork or fork and rear shock. Guide Guard. Simple and Strong. Guiding the brake cable smoothly and quietly in any situation. With just one leg, Ocho has way fewer seals, for way less friction, for way smoother action. SideCar Air Valve. Easier to access. Reduces rotor contamination. Rebound Adjust. Video Not keen to read? Hear all about it from the Cannondale Factory Racing Team in the video below. So when can you get one? The Lefty Ocho is now available on the 2019 Cannondale Scalpel-Si and F-Si range. Below are some highlights from the 2019 Scalpel-Si range which recently arrived on our shores. 2019 Cannondale Scalpel-Si Hi-Mod 1 R 110 000 2019 Cannondale Scalpel-Si Carbon 2 R 99 000 2019 Cannondale Scalpel-Si Carbon 3 R 80 000 2019 Cannondale Scalpel-Si Carbon 4 R 69 000 2019 Cannondale Scalpel-Si 5 (Alloy) R 49 000 2019 Cannondale Scalpel-Si Women's 1 R 110 000 2019 Cannondale Scalpel-Si Women's 2 R 65 000 Those keen on a standalone Ocho will have to wait a bit longer. Market demand means that the Lefty Ocho is unlikely to be available as an aftermarket purchase in the first year of production. See the full Cannondale range (or even order yours) via www.cannondale.co.za
  25. CAAD 12 SUB 7.0 kg Project Aim to build a sub 7 kg disk bike without selling any body parts for funding… FRAME CAAD12 54cm SmartForm C1 Premium Alloy, SAVE, BB30a, Di2 Ready FORK CAAD12, SAVE, BallisTec full carbon, HEADSET CAAD12, 1-1/4" lower bearing, 25mm top cap WHEELS 420 Aero Disc Tubeless Wheel Pair 1630g TIRES Kenda Valkyrie, 700x25c 182g x2 264 g TUBES Tubolito 700x25c 40g x2 80 g PEDALS Look Keo Blade Cr 232 g CRANKS Cannondale Si, BB30a, FSA rings, 53/39 484g POWER METER Cannondale Si Stages Hollowgram +20 g on above BOTTOM BRACKET FSA BB30 Bearings 74 g CHAIN Sram Eagle XX1 Gold 12 Speed 260 g REAR COGS Sram Red 11-28, 11-speed 144 g SHIFTERS Sram Red 22 Hydro Disk 378 g FRONT DERAILLEUR Sram Force 22 (with catcher) 95 g REAR DERAILLEUR Sram Red 22 146 g HANDLEBAR 3T Aernova 40cm 225 g BAR TAPE Ryder foam 32 g STEM 3T Team ARX 100mm 120 g SADDLE Fabric Scoop Carbon 165 g SEATPOST Mcfk 25.4 105 g BOTTLE CAGES Blackburn Cinch 16 g x 2 32 g Currently this build is on 7.00 kg Flat.
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