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Upgrading road aliminium to carbon frame


Tri-coach
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I have a RC6000 aluminum bicycle coming in at +-8.5kg, how much weight would I save upgrading to carbon?

 

What is the difference in frame weights between carbon and aluminum, for example how would rc6000 aluminum compare to rc6000 carbon?

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Totally different rides. Carbon is much smoother than Alu. Some carbon bikes are heavier than Alu too, so it is not always lighter. More bragging rights than anything else

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I have a RC6000 aluminum bicycle coming in at +-8.5kg, how much weight would I save upgrading to carbon?

 

What is the difference in frame weights between carbon and aluminum, for example how would rc6000 aluminum compare to rc6000 carbon?

GOOGLE is your friend!!

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Weight saving depends on the specific frame and fork combination. For that you'd have to do some Googling. Don't trust the manufacturer's specs e.g. independent weighings show that the Pinarello Dogma is about 200g heavier than Pinarello claims.

 

The listings on the Weight Weenies site give actual weights for a number of components and Competitive Cyclist has actual weights for most of the frames they sell.

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I've ridden 3 frames this year, all old but part of my road cycling learning process. First was an old Cannondale R500T aly frame. Was rock solid and super stable down hill but transferred a tremendous amount of vibration through the frame. I could only hang of for sooo long.

 

Next was a Giant Once also aly frame. Was nice and lightweight but very flexible. It gave a smooth comfortable feel for distance rides but took me into an insane speed wobble each time I neared 55k/hr.

 

I've just purchased a 5 year old Giant TCR C2 carbon frame and WOW.... everything about it is just fantastic---logically considering what I'm comparing it to. It's light, feels like it want's to pull me through the bends, ridgid and extremely stable downhill and super comfortable on the rough surfaces. Apparently the carbon as a rule of thumb gives you a stiff frame but with the cussioning benefits of a flexible frame.

 

I wouldn't cry about a few grams extra weight between frames. Ride the option you're looking at buying and base your purchase on the feedback and feeling you get whilst riding.

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carbon is not all about the weight saving, in most cases you will save weight by going carbon, but the main advantange will be the stiffer frame compared to alu which tend to flex more.

Edited by smerds
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carbon is not all about the weight saving, in most cases you will save weight by going carbon, but the main advantange will be the stiffer frame compared to alu which tend to flex more over time.

 

Alu does not go soft over time.

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It depends which of the RC6000 Carbons you want to compare it to. There were two different versions of the RC6000 carbon, I think the first of the two was slightly lighter.

 

But if you really want to compare to Raleigh frames look at the 2009/2010 RC7000, 8000 and LTD. They are at least 400g lighter than the RC6000 alum.

 

Carbon frames also have much nicer curves and have a bit more status than alum and of course a better re-sale. Everybody wants carbon nowdays.

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