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Getting into running


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Hi All

 

I cycle on average 12hrs p week and my mates are trying to con me into doing a triathlon / duathlon / ironman (gasp!)

 

How hard is it to get into running? how will it affect my cycling?

 

while i feel im quite fit on the bike, theres a good chance im gonna frek if i try run 5km's or something... whats the best way to go about it? walking first? i regularly use a HRM on the bike, how do i adapt zones for running?

 

any advice or resources / links would be appreciated.

Cheers

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Buy the book called "the lore off running" from Prof Tim Noakes and do it right from the start.

 

It will improve your cycling. The secret for you is not to overdo it or you will get injuries etc. Start with 2km easy run. Never do more than 10% of what you did the previous week..... so if you did 10km last week then dont do more than 11km this week etc...

 

Also consider trail running from the start as it is more fun. Running is good as you can get a decent workout in 30minutes which is impossible with cycling...............

 

Good luck and welcome to triathlon

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One step at a time.

 

Go do a 5 km run .Run for 4 minutes walk for 1. Repeat until distance is done. Keep doing it until you can run 5km at a pace which you are comfortable with. Then start increasing distance by no more than 10% per week.

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I started by walking and running a little bit, then walking again etc. Choose good shoes and if possible get fitted for the shoes so you can be assessed and not suffer any injuries. I feel a bit quicker on the cycling after doing some running for a couple of months, however that could also be because I have lost some weight!

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Best is to start by running small bit and then walking a bit and so forth building distance until you can run a full 5km in one go.

You could probly just run the full distance but in a day or two you will be so stiff it's not even funny :P

I found that while my legs adjusted quickly, my respiratory (sp?) system took allot longer to be able to cope.

 

Be sure to also go to a reputable running shop that can analyse your gait and running style and recommend the correct shoes for you.

Be carefull of shops trying to sell you minimalist shoes off the batt as well, you need some time to adapt to running first.

Good socks are also nb to avoid blisters on your feet.

 

Depending on your area and focus I would actually recommend taking up trailrunning and not road running.

The dirt is softer and thus less impact on your body, you use more core and other muscles when running off-road and because of the varied terrain overuse injuries are less common than on the road. Also no drunk drivers to worry about. Just be careful of rolling your ankle but it will become allot stronger quite quick.

 

I think all cyclists should do some running, as the impact is good for counteracting the effects of cycling on your bones as a non-impact sport.

 

Sure the more experienced runners like Dangle will provide some more info.

 

Next thing you will be contemplating the Comrades...

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good shoes and take it easy..... slow jog and walking at first. Even though you're fit, running has a different impact on the knees and legs so take it slow

 

rest and stop running the minute you feel any problems, never run through them.

 

and I can vouch for the never do more than 10 percent of the last week. About 4 years ago I jumped from 9km to 21km over the space of one week.... needless to say I've never been able to run again. it was a stupid thing to do but I thought I was fit enough.

 

and trail running is far more fun.

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The biggest trap is overreaching, A A...

Build mileage slowly.

Although you have the cardiovascular capacity built by cycling, this is an entirely different endurance sport.

 

Get a good assessment of shoe choice as well.

 

 

Good Luck!

 

*There's so much to learn here*

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+1 on Tim Naokes' "Lore of running"

 

It looks like a big read, but you don't have to get through the whole thing. The beginner program in there is very conservative and is definitely a good option. He states that often it is the previously active people (read: cyclists :whistling:) that get injured when starting running because they increase their milage too quickly and get frustrated holding back.

 

His programme feels too slow (it starts off with walking for 2 weeks before even running at all!), but trust me and stick with it and you will go far. Most of my friends got injuries and now I out run all of them because they are nursing themselves. Personally I used my running days as active recovery and would do my hard sessions on the bike every other day. Personally I would not even increase by 10%.

 

Also +1 on shoes. As soon as you are running more than 15min per session I would start looking for decent shoes.

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www.beginnertriathlete.com has two "couch-to-5k" programs. A conservative one and a slightly more aggresive one. Even though you are not literally coming off the couch I would still suggest following one of these as it gets your body used to the impact etc.
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don't do it!!

 

...running is for poor people who don't have bicycles!

 

Besides, it's not a real sport. the only times when one should run is when chasing someone/something, or when being chased!

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don't do it!!

 

...running is for poor people who don't have bicycles!

 

Besides, it's not a real sport. the only times when one should run is when chasing someone/something, or when being chased!

 

hahaha, so far i like this answer best!

 

thanks for the advice guys, i quite like the idea of trail running... i live on the spruit so perhaps a basic walk / run a little bit theory is the way forward.

 

should i aim for 5kms first time out though? what sort of time should i be looking at rather than distance . 30/ 45 minutes?

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One step at a time.

 

Go do a 5 km run .Run for 4 minutes walk for 1. Repeat until distance is done. Keep doing it until you can run 5km at a pace which you are comfortable with. Then start increasing distance by no more than 10% per week.

 

Exactly that.

 

Oh, and start with barefoot or minimal from the start.

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hahaha, so far i like this answer best!

 

thanks for the advice guys, i quite like the idea of trail running... i live on the spruit so perhaps a basic walk / run a little bit theory is the way forward.

 

should i aim for 5kms first time out though? what sort of time should i be looking at rather than distance . 30/ 45 minutes?

 

You will run 5k the first time out you just wont be able to walk the next day. Take it easy. When last did you run? Probably when you were back in school. You really need to teach yourself to run again. Start with a 2K run 3k max you'll see its a lot further than you think. Get into running very very very slowly else you will pick up ITB problems very quickly which will screw up your cycling to. Depending on your age and when you last really were able to run it will take you a good 6 to 8 months before you start to feel comfortable on the road. Easy does it Tiger :)

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