Jump to content

Road race gear set


Bosveldbaas
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi. I have a Scott mtb with Chain set: Shimano FC-M627 2-piece Design 700 Series: 38x24 T, and rear casette: Shimano CS-HG50-10 11-36 T. I have a set of slic tyres for road riding, but want to change my cassette to different gear ratio. I run out of ratio on descents. What cassette will be more suitable for road race?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with VB, the shortcoming is too small a big chainring upfront. Not sure how big you can go and still have it work with your derailleur, but if you want to have a chance to keep up with the roadies on the fast flats and downhills, you are going to need something with at least around 50 teeth. 

 

From my experience, you will be frustrated and buy a road bike sooner or later, purely because it is the right tool for the job. You can buy real 2nd hand roadie bargains that are a few years old but still competitive, will not lose value and won't cost much to maintain. (Unlike mtbs)

Edited by DJR
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A quick thumb-suck?

 

See if there is a pressure indicated on the outside of your tyres. I think 60 to 80 psi (5 bar) should be pretty efficient and comfortable for an average weight rider (70-80 kg) on large volume tyres like yours.  But you can go up to 100 -120 psi (7-8 bar ) which will reduce rolling resistance but also increase harshness and reduce grip. Lighter riders will get the same effect at lower pressures, heavier riders will have to up pressures a bit.

 

Best is to get a floor pump with a good gauge and experiment around the block. I find that I intuitively "feel" where the ride quality feels best - where the sweet spot is - and that is the pressure I use.

Edited by DJR
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A quick thumb-suck?

 

See if there is a pressure indicated on the outside of your tyres. I think 60 to 80 psi (5 bar) should be pretty efficient and comfortable for an average weight rider (70-80 kg) on large volume tyres like yours.  But you can go up to 100 -120 psi (7-8 bar ) which will reduce rolling resistance but also increase harshness and reduce grip. Lighter riders will get the same effect at lower pressures, heavier riders will have to up pressures a bit.

 

Best is to get a floor pump with a good gauge and experiment around the block. I find that I intuitively "feel" where the ride quality feels best - where the sweet spot is - and that is the pressure I use.

 

Remember that MTB rims are not designed for the same pressure as road rims.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Remember that MTB rims are not designed for the same pressure as road rims.

Where is the sensible upper limit? (Asking because I don't know and I don't want anybody to blow a rim at 40 km/h. in the middle of a bunch.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi. I have a Scott mtb with Chain set: Shimano FC-M627 2-piece Design 700 Series: 38x24 T, and rear casette: Shimano CS-HG50-10 11-36 T. I have a set of slic tyres for road riding, but want to change my cassette to different gear ratio. I run out of ratio on descents. What cassette will be more suitable for road race?

 

 

You're pretty much maxed out on the available chainring sizes for the 104/64 BCD cranks.

 

Your options are too;

 

1) fit a CX crank with 110BCD

 

2) fit a 10T cassette  (very limited gearing upgrade)

 

3) get a road/CX/gravel bike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

 

You can change the front rings to a 40/28 set up

I did exactly that with a hardtail mtb and pumped my tyres to 2.5 bar .It was my first road bike .On a 100km race you will lose about 6-8 min because of the bike 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did exactly that with a hardtail mtb and pumped my tyres to 2.5 bar .It was my first road bike .On a 100km race you will lose about 6-8 min because of the bike

 

Pump youre tyres 3bar + all depending what the rim &tyre allows ,my buddy did a 3h28 on his mtb in his first argus on this ratio

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

My Profile My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Settings Help Logout