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Slowbee's CTCT 2020 ride report


Slowbee
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The day started off with a panic, which had actually set in the day before ride day.

 

In getting ready for the big ride I was hunting round for that racechip. But I could just not find it anywhere. Then Mrs Slowbee reminded me my bike was stolen and also most likely my chip. And no, I did not take it with me to have it scanned at the expo.  Time was 15H45 and the expo was closing at 16H00. Lucky someone answered the phone and told me I could buy a new one at the start.

 

No late sleep in for the 08H45 start (5e). I had a chip to buy! I really enjoy the start of these big events. The total chaos of people going in every direction except yours. And what a mix of bikes. Some I think are steel from old world war 1 tanks and others have such flimsy plastic they were bend in a breeze.  Not that there was a wind at the start. What I liked about our start group was that it had a mix of first timers, with a 0 on their numbers to others who had like 19. None of this panic sprint nonsense, just a gentle pedal to get us going.

 

Now hospital hill was very quiet. As in no noise, nothing. Sure one or two folk were out, but the huge groups of people shouting hello were all gone. But the pain was not. That Hospital hill hurts, and I don’t like it. The hill that it is.

 

All to soon it was flying past the fire base and up Whineburg hill. For us back markers the tricky bit is speed down the hill cannot be used to help going up the other side. The road just clogs full of people. Then it is a case of just sit up and pedal gently. Till someone offers you a late morning rusk.  Thank you to the Jones family just before the top for the rusk, tea and a chat. It was a perfect break to the hectic pace.

 

But Ladies’ Mile was a jol! Was strolling along and 3 riders came past. I asked if I could hook onto the back and then then fun started. The lead guy was clueless, he would pull us along like mad and then slip back and then try sprint past. I had two young Nedbank riders with me  with takkies on. Sheesh they were strong. I asked them how fast they wanted to go …. the answer… we dunno … as fast as possible. By this time another guy had joined us (thank you Alain). I asked him if he could pace at 27km/, no worries. I told the two youngsters to stick to his wheel. Even if he slows down, don’t try overtake, just brake slowly and stick with it. Don’t overlap wheels and just keep the pace even.  The group will work better together.  Lots of folk tried to sprint past, but eventually we reeled them in again. It was only when we got to Kalkies did I realise how big the train had become. So many guys where just taking turns in the front. Those two guys with the Nedbank shirts (the one guy was Eric) were smiling from ear to ear. I don’t think they stopped smiling after that.

 

But then it was Simons Town.  Coffee and croissant.  And toilet. That tea needed processing.

 

By the time I was on the road again I saw an oldish guy with an upturned bike. A quick ask for help let me know it was a jammed chain and he was battling. Turns out his daughter  jammed the chain in-between the frame and chain ring. Every time he turned it the chain would hook over an ever so slightly raised bolt on the chain ring. We need something flat, like a screw driver. No worries, out came 4 teaspoons. I mean who carries teaspoons…..we have fancy plastic tyre levers now. He said not to worry about bending them, his wife has lots. But a few minutes later, a happy daughter that she was going to finish her first argus, a quick lesson in no cross chaining, a few handshakes exchanged and we were all back on the road.

 

As we started heading towards Millers I met a bloke with a Zim flag, Mr Jabulani. Turns out he was down with a friend in a camper van for the argus. Turns out the friend is the bloke who many years ago used to ride Sani2c on a steel bike with takkies and rugby shorts (maybe some of you will remember them). It was just a great experience for him and he loved having a chat to make the time go by. Actually it landed up that a whole bunch of us got chatting. And so Smits arrived, but by this time, the weather had started to turn, the wind did blow and it blew in the clouds. I really like riding up Smits, it just is such a nice hill. And then the ebikes arrived and the 2nd lappers. But the weather chased the people away from Scarborough. Well Misty Cliffs lived up to its name.  Redhill is also a pain in the butt, it just drags on and on. And more  2nd  lappers started arriving. One of the them was a Savage rider (Dawid). Him and his mate heard me joking around and said I need to pedal faster. I said race on – but about 5 seconds later they were nothing but specs on the horizon. Nearing Noordhoek that family listening to eye of the tiger, over and over and over. It drove me to drink. The champagne was good, but somehow the castle light was perfect. And the couch fitted well.

 

But now I was hungry again. Wait, the firefighters at the bottom of little chappies… bacon+egg+bread = stop! Have a quick snack and hit the road again. Chappies, which is my favourite hill on the ride, was really nice as the wind was now from behind. But by the time we got to the top the heavens opened. Sheesh that rain was hectic side gusting stuff. I have to give all those backmarkers credit! They have some skill! The side gusts were just terrible and everyone managed to stay upright.

 

But alas Suikerboosie arrived. I was wanting to stop for another toddy half way up but happened to come up to the Caleigh trust guys. So I decided I need to suffer a little first. These guys looked knackered. Now I was not going to say I stopped in Hout Bay for a beer, but that would be lying. No Corona though. I offered to help push all the way up little bossie. But the guy i swapped with took my my beer. Never give another Argus rider your beer. It was empty when I got it back!!  But full credit must go to the A batch riders that sprinted past. A quick shout for help, some banter about 2nd laps and to much energy and when they looked round and saw the buggie with a little guy being pushed, they came back to help. That buggie flew up Bossie quick sticks.

 

And then it was time to drop the hammer and fly home –but hells bells you never turn down an offer for free cappuccino and fresh toasted banana bread! Bootlegger for the win.

 

So ended another great ride with more fond memories made.

 

But for those who are interested in the stats:

Overall ride time out some 6hrs give or take.

Total moving time some 4 hrs give or take.

Total stopped time 2 hrs.

Avg Speed about 18km/hr or thereabouts.

Finish position, somewhere near the middle back.

 

 

 

 

 

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The day started off with a panic, which had actually set in the day before ride day.

 

In getting ready for the big ride I was hunting round for that racechip. But I could just not find it anywhere. Then Mrs Slowbee reminded me my bike was stolen and also most likely my chip. And no, I did not take it with me to have it scanned at the expo.  Time was 15H45 and the expo was closing at 16H00. Lucky someone answered the phone and told me I could buy a new one at the start.

 

No late sleep in for the 08H45 start (5e). I had a chip to buy! I really enjoy the start of these big events. The total chaos of people going in every direction except yours. And what a mix of bikes. Some I think are steel from old world war 1 tanks and others have such flimsy plastic they were bend in a breeze.  Not that there was a wind at the start. What I liked about our start group was that it had a mix of first timers, with a 0 on their numbers to others who had like 19. None of this panic sprint nonsense, just a gentle pedal to get us going.

 

Now hospital hill was very quiet. As in no noise, nothing. Sure one or two folk were out, but the huge groups of people shouting hello were all gone. But the pain was not. That Hospital hill hurts, and I don’t like it. The hill that it is.

 

All to soon it was flying past the fire base and up Whineburg hill. For us back markers the tricky bit is speed down the hill cannot be used to help going up the other side. The road just clogs full of people. Then it is a case of just sit up and pedal gently. Till someone offers you a late morning rusk.  Thank you to the Jones family just before the top for the rusk, tea and a chat. It was a perfect break to the hectic pace.

 

But Ladies’ Mile was a jol! Was strolling along and 3 riders came past. I asked if I could hook onto the back and then then fun started. The lead guy was clueless, he would pull us along like mad and then slip back and then try sprint past. I had two young Nedbank riders with me  with takkies on. Sheesh they were strong. I asked them how fast they wanted to go …. the answer… we dunno … as fast as possible. By this time another guy had joined us (thank you Alain). I asked him if he could pace at 27km/, no worries. I told the two youngsters to stick to his wheel. Even if he slows down, don’t try overtake, just brake slowly and stick with it. Don’t overlap wheels and just keep the pace even.  The group will work better together.  Lots of folk tried to sprint past, but eventually we reeled them in again. It was only when we got to Kalkies did I realise how big the train had become. So many guys where just taking turns in the front. Those two guys with the Nedbank shirts (the one guy was Eric) were smiling from ear to ear. I don’t think they stopped smiling after that.

 

But then it was Simons Town.  Coffee and croissant.  And toilet. That tea needed processing.

 

By the time I was on the road again I saw an oldish guy with an upturned bike. A quick ask for help let me know it was a jammed chain and he was battling. Turns out his daughter  jammed the chain in-between the frame and chain ring. Every time he turned it the chain would hook over an ever so slightly raised bolt on the chain ring. We need something flat, like a screw driver. No worries, out came 4 teaspoons. I mean who carries teaspoons…..we have fancy plastic tyre levers now. He said not to worry about bending them, his wife has lots. But a few minutes later, a happy daughter that she was going to finish her first argus, a quick lesson in no cross chaining, a few handshakes exchanged and we were all back on the road.

 

As we started heading towards Millers I met a bloke with a Zim flag, Mr Jabulani. Turns out he was down with a friend in a camper van for the argus. Turns out the friend is the bloke who many years ago used to ride Sani2c on a steel bike with takkies and rugby shorts (maybe some of you will remember them). It was just a great experience for him and he loved having a chat to make the time go by. Actually it landed up that a whole bunch of us got chatting. And so Smits arrived, but by this time, the weather had started to turn, the wind did blow and it blew in the clouds. I really like riding up Smits, it just is such a nice hill. And then the ebikes arrived and the 2nd lappers. But the weather chased the people away from Scarborough. Well Misty Cliffs lived up to its name.  Redhill is also a pain in the butt, it just drags on and on. And more  2nd  lappers started arriving. One of the them was a Savage rider (Dawid). Him and his mate heard me joking around and said I need to pedal faster. I said race on – but about 5 seconds later they were nothing but specs on the horizon. Nearing Noordhoek that family listening to eye of the tiger, over and over and over. It drove me to drink. The champagne was good, but somehow the castle light was perfect. And the couch fitted well.

 

But now I was hungry again. Wait, the firefighters at the bottom of little chappies… bacon+egg+bread = stop! Have a quick snack and hit the road again. Chappies, which is my favourite hill on the ride, was really nice as the wind was now from behind. But by the time we got to the top the heavens opened. Sheesh that rain was hectic side gusting stuff. I have to give all those backmarkers credit! They have some skill! The side gusts were just terrible and everyone managed to stay upright.

 

But alas Suikerboosie arrived. I was wanting to stop for another toddy half way up but happened to come up to the Caleigh trust guys. So I decided I need to suffer a little first. These guys looked knackered. Now I was not going to say I stopped in Hout Bay for a beer, but that would be lying. No Corona though. I offered to help push all the way up little bossie. But the guy i swapped with took my my beer. Never give another Argus rider your beer. It was empty when I got it back!!  But full credit must go to the A batch riders that sprinted past. A quick shout for help, some banter about 2nd laps and to much energy and when they looked round and saw the buggie with a little guy being pushed, they came back to help. That buggie flew up Bossie quick sticks.

 

And then it was time to drop the hammer and fly home –but hells bells you never turn down an offer for free cappuccino and fresh toasted banana bread! Bootlegger for the win.

 

So ended another great ride with more fond memories made.

 

But for those who are interested in the stats:

Overall ride time out some 6hrs give or take.

Total moving time some 4 hrs give or take.

Total stopped time 2 hrs.

Avg Speed about 18km/hr or thereabouts.

Finish position, somewhere near the middle back.

Very cool way to do the CTCT - I had a similar day out where my riding time was fast by my standards but it was the stops and the chats along the way that made the day special

 

I bragged before the day that I had moved myself up to 13 000th on Sukerbossies Stava list and planned to improve on race day - fuelled but a good pint in Houtbay I am now the 8009th fastest person up  - so next year a few more beers and maybe I'm a contender

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Man I wish I could do the Argus like this.

 

No my bloody ego gets in the way - stupid.

 

Same medal in the end but more experience.

Find a friend slower than you but not too slow - commit to being his/her/insert other domestique

 

Place friends or family en route - you'll stop and you won't regret it

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