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Road bike - weight 127kg and height 170.


Philip Janse Van Vuuren
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I wouldnt personally ride carbon at that weight. But alu road bikes that are well speccd are super common and choice depemds on budget. Steel is real and would he my choice. It is my choice, actually, at 120kgs i ride a ritchey road logic and a spez sequoia, both steel frames.

 

You might want to set aside some cash for a proper Clydesdale wheelset build, at least 32 spokes front and rear...

 

Sizing depends on the bike and how it fits you so i would spend the extra time to get one that fits you rather than just fits your budget

 

Lastly, id recommend looking, if your budget allows, for a gravel bike instead of a pure roadie.. Youre not going to be at the sharp end at that weight anyway, and gravel components are built strong and should give better peace of mind. You can always fit skinny tyres, and the option to head for gravel is really nice, as are disk brakes when youre heavy.

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I wouldnt personally ride carbon at that weight. But alu road bikes that are well speccd are super common and choice depemds on budget. Steel is real and would he my choice. It is my choice, actually, at 120kgs i ride a ritchey road logic and a spez sequoia, both steel frames.

 

You might want to set aside some cash for a proper Clydesdale wheelset build, at least 32 spokes front and rear...

 

Sizing depends on the bike and how it fits you so i would spend the extra time to get one that fits you rather than just fits your budget

 

Lastly, id recommend looking, if your budget allows, for a gravel bike instead of a pure roadie.. Youre not going to be at the sharp end at that weight anyway, and gravel components are built strong and should give better peace of mind. You can always fit skinny tyres, and the option to head for gravel is really nice, as are disk brakes when youre heavy.

 

All good advice. In particular be careful on carbon forks - they are not normally designed for that weight.

 

If you are not planning on getting wheels built you can also take an existing wheelset in to your LBS and discuss whether they can reset the spoke tension for you.

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Some carbon wheels dont have weight limit,  most alu wheels is limited at 90kg , so make sure, as others said, to get appropriate  wheels till you drop off the extra lbs... its sucks replacing spokes every ride....

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Meh...not to be disrespectful, but have you guys seen some of the couples/pairs straddling tandem bikes at the cycle tour? There must be plenty strong enough wheels out there for bigger single riders even in alloy. My vintage roadie has some Mavic open pro 36 spoke wheels on it and those things are super beefy.

 

Edit:

Here’s an alloy wheel that states 130kg

https://www.dtswiss.com/en/components/rims-road/performance/rr-511

 

Also check out 700c wheels for loaded touring...but imo something wider or in n deepish section with 32+ Spokes should be plenty. Remember to gooi 28c or larger rubber on there.

Edited by morneS555
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Have a look at my cotic escapade (In the classifieds). I built it up a few years ago. No sign of giving in. Steel is real. I weight quite a bit more than you kitted up with commuter backpack on.

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Have a look at my cotic escapade (In the classifieds). I built it up a few years ago. No sign of giving in. Steel is real. I weight quite a bit more than you kitted up with commuter backpack on.

Wish those came in my size.

 

Edit: discovered this by pure accident last night.

 

https://www.mellowvelo.co.za/shop/bikes/gravel-cx-bikes/norco-search-xr-steel-frameset-2019/

 

Maybe an option for op

Edited by morneS555
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Have a look at my cotic escapade (In the classifieds). I built it up a few years ago. No sign of giving in. Steel is real. I weight quite a bit more than you kitted up with commuter backpack on.

If this fits, it is an excellent option but probably too big.

 

Look for something similar

Edited by eddy
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I would buy a gravel bike, their wheels are generally built stronger and the rims are rated for bigger impacts. Furthermore, I would run a nice wide slick. I personally ride Panaracer Gravelking Slick Plus TLC 700x38C. 

 

There is ample evidence that wider tyres are not slower in the real world and they are definitely a lot more comfortable and provide more grip if pumped to the correct pressure.

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I have a size S/M steel frame road bike.

 

I'm 1.74m short.

 

It is a Planet  Kaffenback disc road bike. It has a set of wheels we can swap out. It lives on my trainer currently but if you are interested you can PM me and let me know.

 

It takes up to 35c tires and currently runs 32c Road tires. 

 

It's not fancy, but it definitely does the job

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PhilipJvv,

 

I am no expert on this, BUT BMC used to build frames for the bigger/heavier riders. Not sure what you could pick one up for 2nd hand, but they seemed to be bulletproof.

I regularly trained with 2 "prominent" guys on BMC's. One of them had issues with rear wheel spokes though, but the frames were solid.

 

Good luck

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I have been that weight, Carbon frame no problem..Spez Roubaix Comp as well as SL2 Tarmac.

Wheels were Mavic Elites, Campi Eurus or Zonda's..and that was 21 spokes rear and 16 front.

I am still riding those same wheels, no problem. Just my 5c.. :thumbup:

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I have been that weight, Carbon frame no problem..Spez Roubaix Comp as well as SL2 Tarmac.

Wheels were Mavic Elites, Campi Eurus or Zonda's..and that was 21 spokes rear and 16 front.

I am still riding those same wheels, no problem. Just my 5c.. :thumbup:

Yeah and you could drive to Cairo from Cape Town in a polo... Doesnt mean i wouldnt take a landcruiser instead...

 

The overkill is worth the reduced hassle, stress, and lost riding time in breaking spokes and stressing over potholes.

 

I dont think you need to go tandem strength, im just saying avoid the low spoke count wheels. Ive broken enough spokes and had to limp home with open brake calipers enough times to tell you its a properly kuk idea.

 

I do think frames and forks are strong enough, its the strength when things go pear shaped that concern me, especially with carbon. Hit a proper dip in the road at 80km/h descents? Yeah, not a good plan for a 120kg rider, thats for sure...

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