Jump to content

New Road Bike Thoughts


catherine123
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all, I am super keen on getting a road bike now. I have been to a couple of stores and they either want to sell me their most expensive brands or they dont have stock of the one I think I really want. I went to a well known LBS and they said I had to buy the bike first before I could be sized and fitted to it etc - that made no sense, especially since I had no idea at the time of what I wanted to buy.

 

Are there no LBS' in the KZN area that actually help you to choose the best bike for what you want it for? For your size? Help you to fit to it before you choose what you want? Help you understand the gears/ratios and so forth? Or do they just want to sell you their stuff? I am so new to this, I dont know what to get! I want help and guidance to choose what I want but no one wants to do that? And the ones I have been shown, are either so expensive and a decent colour or cheap and a nasty colour.

 

I want a decent road bike, with the right ratio of quality gears etc for me, that looks good too! Please help?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you are new to it, the gear ratios are simple. a compact crank 50/34 and a 11-28 or 11-30 cassette if the RD can accept it.

 

Re brands etc, just buy the one you like. there's tons out there and can be really confusing.

 

Not sure which shops you have been to but try Cyclesphere if you haven't already, speak to Greg or Ruphus.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is your desired bike and budget ?

Also, how tall are you ?

Are you new to cycling or fairly experienced?

Are you going to race, or happy with group/club rides?

 

Most bike are coming out with compact cranks and biggish cassettes as standard. Chainrings and cassettes are replaceable, so you can customise to your requirements. 

I would personally stay away from disc brakes - When they work, they are fantastic (and they are generally reliable), but they add weight and complication and are expensive to repair.

A really good aluminium frame can be better/lighter than a bad carbon frame, so don't buy carbon for the sake of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nobody is going to fit you to a bike you haven't already bought. A proper bike fit takes time and sometimes requires components (not unusually the stem) on the bike to be changed in order to achieve a proper fit.

 

Most decent bikes don't come with pedals. Which means that pedals need to be fitted to the bike before you can do a bike fit. Which means that you need to decide what pedals you want – and pay for them – and what shoes you're going to be using – and have bought them – before anything can be done by way of a bike fit. Among a number of different things, the stack height (which is to say the thickness of the sole) also affects the bike fit.

 

But you don't need to have a bike fit done in order to be able to buy the right size bike. Road bikes are typically sold with frame size correlating to rider height. You will find any number of tables online indicating what size bike you need, relative to your own dimensions. Where possible, check the specifications on the website of the manufacturer of the bike you are interested in.

 

Once you have the right frame size, the rest of the fit is (usually) done without too much difficulty.

 

As for the gear ratios, the advice above is correct. You can even get an 11 – 34 cassette onto a 50/34 crank/chainring set up if you have a long cage derailleur on the back. That'll give you good climbing ability. But depending upon which bike you buy, you might have to be prepared to fork out to fit a new derailleur (many are medium or short cage). The cassette will have to be an aftermarket purchase as, as far as I know, no road bike comes standard with an 11 – 34 cassette.

Edited by MudLark
Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you are new to it, the gear ratios are simple. a compact crank 50/34 and a 11-28 or 11-30 cassette if the RD can accept it.

 

Re brands etc, just buy the one you like. there's tons out there and can be really confusing.

 

Not sure which shops you have been to but try Cyclesphere if you haven't already, speak to Greg or Ruphus.

Will definitely try them! Heard they are excellent!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is your desired bike and budget ?

Also, how tall are you ?

Are you new to cycling or fairly experienced?

Are you going to race, or happy with group/club rides?

 

Most bike are coming out with compact cranks and biggish cassettes as standard. Chainrings and cassettes are replaceable, so you can customise to your requirements. 

I would personally stay away from disc brakes - When they work, they are fantastic (and they are generally reliable), but they add weight and complication and are expensive to repair.

A really good aluminium frame can be better/lighter than a bad carbon frame, so don't buy carbon for the sake of it.

Non-carbon roadie. Budget depends on whats available really. After a new bike but if I can get a really decent secondhand one then that would be great too.

I am 1.62m.

Ridden before but never on a roadie, whole new game here I think. Race and club rides to keep fit etc etc

Can ladies ride mens bikes? I am finding the ladies options boring and lacking abit! And the one I really want, they dont have stock of...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nobody is going to fit you to a bike you haven't already bought. A proper bike fit takes time and sometimes requires components (not unusually the stem) on the bike to be changed in order to achieve a proper fit.

 

Most decent bikes don't come with pedals. Which means that pedals need to be fitted to the bike before you can do a bike fit. Which means that you need to decide what pedals you want – and pay for them – and what shoes you're going to be using – and have bought them – before anything can be done by way of a bike fit. Among a number of different things, the stack height (which is to say the thickness of the sole) also affects the bike fit.

 

But you don't need to have a bike fit done in order to be able to buy the right size bike. Road bikes are typically sold with frame size correlating to rider height. You will find any number of tables online indicating what size bike you need, relative to your own dimensions. Where possible, check the specifications on the website of the manufacturer of the bike you are interested in.

 

Once you have the right frame size, the rest of the fit is (usually) done without too much difficulty.

 

As for the gear ratios, the advice above is correct. You can even get an 11 – 34 cassette onto a 50/34 crank/chainring set up if you have a long cage derailleur on the back. That'll give you good climbing ability. But depending upon which bike you buy, you might have to be prepared to fork out to fit a new derailleur (many are medium or short cage). The cassette will have to be an aftermarket purchase as, as far as I know, no road bike comes standard with an 11 – 34 cassette.

That is more understandable now that you explain it. The only site that came close to helping me understand everything was Scott, with their Help me find my bike tool... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Non-carbon roadie. Budget depends on whats available really. After a new bike but if I can get a really decent secondhand one then that would be great too.

I am 1.62m.

Ridden before but never on a roadie, whole new game here I think. Race and club rides to keep fit etc etc

Can ladies ride mens bikes? I am finding the ladies options boring and lacking abit! And the one I really want, they dont have stock of...

Sounds to me like you know which one you want... So tell them to order one and get it?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Non-carbon roadie. Budget depends on whats available really. After a new bike but if I can get a really decent secondhand one then that would be great too.

I am 1.62m.

Ridden before but never on a roadie, whole new game here I think. Race and club rides to keep fit etc etc

Can ladies ride mens bikes? I am finding the ladies options boring and lacking abit! And the one I really want, they dont have stock of...

You're going to get way more bang for your buck buying a good used road bike. Many used road bikes are in mint or close to mint condition and as a general rule are not subject to anything even remotely akin to the wear and tear mountain bikes experience. And road bikes devalue very fast but the technology doesn't change very quickly.

 

You don't need to buy a ladies bike. Many (most AFAIK) manufacturers don't make gender specific bikes across their ranges. All that matters is that the frame is the right size. Saddles are sometimes gender specific but many (most AFAIK) are unisex. But saddles can be readily changed anyway.

Edited by MudLark
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is more understandable now that you explain it. The only site that came close to helping me understand everything was Scott, with their Help me find my bike tool... 

 

He certainly has merit in his statements ....

 

BUT, any decent bikeshop should assist you with with a "basic fit" before you buy.

 

fitting a pair of flat pedals to a bike takes seconds.  Checking the critical fitment dimensions takes a few more seconds ....

 

 

By now you know if you need to buy a "51cm" frame (which is closer to a 1,76 person).

 

 

Having chosen the bike and frame size the real fitment is done, and ideally by a specialist

 

 

 

PS - when I bought my first dual suspension bike the owner of the shop sold me a bike where the frame was too small for me, more to the point, he sold the stock he had on the floor rather than advising me properly and ordering the correct size .... by the time I got longer rides and got aches and pains form the wrong frame I had to sell that bike, and go buy another bike ..... So please make sure you get the correct size.

 

PPS - left the other brand, and now also riding SCOTT  :clap:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He certainly has merit in his statements ....

 

BUT, any decent bikeshop should assist you with with a "basic fit" before you buy.

 

fitting a pair of flat pedals to a bike takes seconds.  Checking the critical fitment dimensions takes a few more seconds ....

 

 

By now you know if you need to buy a "51cm" frame (which is closer to a 1,76 person).

 

 

Having chosen the bike and frame size the real fitment is done, and ideally by a specialist

 

 

 

PS - when I bought my first dual suspension bike the owner of the shop sold me a bike where the frame was too small for me, more to the point, he sold the stock he had on the floor rather than advising me properly and ordering the correct size .... by the time I got longer rides and got aches and pains form the wrong frame I had to sell that bike, and go buy another bike ..... So please make sure you get the correct size.

 

PPS - left the other brand, and now also riding SCOTT  :clap:

New Road Bike...not flat pedals and full suspension

Link to comment
Share on other sites

New Road Bike...not flat pedals and full suspension

 

Dont need clipless to check the frame size ...

 

Buying a road bike, hardtail, full suss, gravel bike, etc ... CHECK the size before putting money on the table.  And NO, you should not rely on the salesperson only (I do know a few good salespoeple, sadly a few bad apples in the trade as well)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

PS - when I bought my first dual suspension bike the owner of the shop sold me a bike where the frame was too small for me, more to the point, he sold the stock he had on the floor rather than advising me properly and ordering the correct size .... by the time I got longer rides and got aches and pains form the wrong frame I had to sell that bike, and go buy another bike ..... So please make sure you get the correct size.

Goeie klap required. [emoji85]

 

But the manufacturer's online sizing guides have always worked for me. So far, anyway. In my case, Trek.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont need clipless to check the frame size ...

 

Buying a road bike, hardtail, full suss, gravel bike, etc ... CHECK the size before putting money on the table.  And NO, you should not rely on the salesperson only (I do know a few good salespoeple, sadly a few bad apples in the trade as well)

You do.The height is different for a clipless pedal and shoe

Edited by Kranswurm
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buying a bike takes a lot of your own research on-line and then popping into various shops to see what they offer...and yes, the shops are always too keen to sell you the stock that they have on the floor.

I have been very happy with the Lapierre brand and you can contact "Over the Bars" in Umhlanga Rocks Drive (Durban) to check out the (carbon) Sensium. It is a bike that is not too stiff to give a jarring ride. They have 2017 stock they are selling off at a reduced price (R18k) with 105 components. (I bought the Xelius (bigger brother) and have been totally happy).

 

Go and look at a lot of bikes before you make your choice. Its no good being unhappy once you've made the purchase.

 

Search for "Over the Bars" in the Bike Hub classified section...then go see their facebook page.

Good Luck...

(PS: I don't have any business connection to OTB's)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont need clipless to check the frame size ...

 

Buying a road bike, hardtail, full suss, gravel bike, etc ... CHECK the size before putting money on the table.  And NO, you should not rely on the salesperson only (I do know a few good salespoeple, sadly a few bad apples in the trade as well)

 

 

You do.The height is different for a clipless pedal and shoe

Kranswurm, did you read his reply? He was referring to checking the Frame size, not doing a full final Bike Fit.

 

I'm with Chris on this one, you can get a very good check of whether the Frame Size could work for you with normal Flats.

 

Although, what I would advise Catherine, is to find a BikeFitter that has one of those Retul setups where he can dial in your Bikefit to the millimeter and then record those values, to be transferred to the bike you eventually buy. Tell him your story upfront. Those guys usually have a bunch of pedals and saddles to get you sorted in detail of what you would need. He will check your flexibility in your hamstrings and other areas and will set you up for how comfortable or how aero you want to ride. Make a package deal with him to do your full fit on the Retul and to then transfer those measurement to the bike you will eventually buy, be it new or 2nd-hand. It should be in the region of R1500 for the entire deal, might even be less. The measurements you will go shop with is REACH and STACK, and he will explain to you how to measure prospective bikes to ensure that he can get you fitted to it with the minimum replacement of parts like stems etc.

 

Good luck

 

BikeHub classifieds is a treasure trove of good deals if you know what you need to buy.

Edited by Swift&Aero
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

My Profile My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Settings Help Logout