Jump to content

Nitrogen in Shocks


MTBer
 Share

Recommended Posts

Has any one ever thought or tried to put Nitrogen in their shocks

 

Y not try it. It does work on tyres and could not be that different. Nitogen is lighter that CO2. I know TSW tyre shops sell inflates their tyres with Nitrogen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I presume you're differentiating between forks and shocks.

 

All fox shocks come charged with Nitrogen and some special equipment is required to get it in there. Some of the other shock companies have been kinder on us and inflate with plain old air via a simple schrader valve.

 

In order to get Nitrogen in your Fox shock you'll need a nitrogen cylinder, a regulator and some highly secret stuff that Fox won't reveal.

 

However, it is quite simple.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my shock has a combination of nitrogen:oxygen at (78:21) in it. The other 1% is trade secret. It works! I could fill your shock up with the same for a nominal fee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my shock has a combination of nitrogen:oxygen at (78:21) in it. The other 1% is trade secret. It works! I could fill your shock up with the same for a nominal fee.

I know what your 1% trade secret is! For all those waiting in anticipation, the other 1% is as follows:

Argon (Ar)=0.9340%

Carbon dioxide (CO2)=0.039%

Neon (Ne)=0.001818%

Helium (He)=0.000524%

Methane (CH4)=0.000179%

Krypton (Kr)=0.000114%

Hydrogen (H2)=0.000055%

Nitrous oxide (N2O)=0.00003%

Carbon monoxide (CO)=0.00001%

Xenon (Xe)=9 × 10−6%

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Went onto a site now that shows that the weight of Nitrogen vs Air per square foot is absolutly minimal.

 

 

Air

 

According to the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, the density of dry air at 20 degrees C at 760 mm of mercury (one atmosphere of pressure) is 1.204 milligrams per cubic centimeter.

 

1 cubic foot = 28,316.8467 cubic centimeters.

 

So, dry air weighs 34,093.48 mg per cu.ft.

 

Which is about 1.2 ounces per cu.ft. (34 mg)

 

 

And Nitrogen per square foot 35.561641808000005 mg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not quite sure why Fox or anyone would want to put nitrogen in a bicycle shock / fork or bicycle tyre. Perhaps to minimize moisture in the air and related problems (corrosion, contamination...)

 

In aviation (on hi pressure tyres on heavy aircraft, not puddle jumpers) the main reason is to reduce the risk of explosion in the event of a wheel fire. The oxygen present in a air filled tyre can explode apparently when combined with other gasses given off as a result of a seriously over heated tyre....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cut cut cut cut

 

In aviation (on hi pressure tyres on heavy aircraft, not puddle jumpers) the main reason is to reduce the risk of explosion in the event of a wheel fire. The oxygen present in a air filled tyre can explode apparently when combined with other gasses given off as a result of a seriously over heated tyre....

 

This is the first sane explanation I've heard for nitrogen in tyres. I've heard lots of BS from Corsa Lite racers who only fill with nitrogen at Tiger Wheel and Tyre but most of it made as much sense as the wings on their bootlid.

 

I'm still at a loss for the meaning of a puddle jumper.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi ..

nitrogen is used in aircraft tyres and car tyres coz it does not expand as much when temp goes up , thus keeping tyre pressure at the same pressure as the tyres heat up . aircraft use it due to altittude change as the pressure does not increase and burst the tyre at high alt . A bonus to using nitrogen is that its molocules are larger than air s so does not deflate as quick as air does in the normal porousity of tyres / tubes .so tyres stay up for longer between rides

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi ..

nitrogen is used in aircraft tyres and car tyres coz it does not expand as much when temp goes up , thus keeping tyre pressure at the same pressure as the tyres heat up . aircraft use it due to altittude change as the pressure does not increase and burst the tyre at high alt . A bonus to using nitrogen is that its molocules are larger than air s so does not deflate as quick as air does in the normal porousity of tyres / tubes .so tyres stay up for longer between rides

 

Hmmmmm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi ..

nitrogen is used in aircraft tyres and car tyres coz it does not expand as much when temp goes up , thus keeping tyre pressure at the same pressure as the tyres heat up . aircraft use it due to altittude change as the pressure does not increase and burst the tyre at high alt . A bonus to using nitrogen is that its molocules are larger than air s so does not deflate as quick as air does in the normal porousity of tyres / tubes .so tyres stay up for longer between rides

This is the only sane explanation I have heard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

Settings My Forum Content My Followed Content Forum Settings Ad Messages My Ads My Favourites My Saved Alerts My Pay Deals Help Logout