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Shimano Dura-Ace Di2: 11-speed and disc brakes for 2013?


NotSoBigBen
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Disc brakes should present an interesting engineering challenge for carbon forks on a road bike.

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Dura-Ace 2013's 11 sprockets will apparently be packed onto a new freehub body that's wider than current 10-speed bodies; it's unclear at this point if the proprietary body width and spline pattern will at least share cog spacing with Campagnolo. One can only hope on that point, as that would have huge implications for wheel choice.

 

 

Booooo :thumbdown:

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Liking the 11 Speed :thumbup:

 

I don't know why they don't just jump to 12 speed. As much as I like Shimano and except for Di2, they always play catch-up. Luckily not as far behind as Sram though.

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What do disk brakes offer on a normal road bike that rim brakes don't?

 

I don't know about the racing snakes, but I know there are a lot of roadie weekend warriors who would welcome the braking power that hydraulic discs provide.

 

There may also be some aero benefits to disc brakes.

 

As for the engineering challenge, everything is in place. We just need someone to make a hydraulic STI lever.

 

Planet X already sells an extremely well-priced carbon cylclo-cross frameset with disc tabs.

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I don't know about the racing snakes, but I know there are a lot of roadie weekend warriors who would welcome the braking power that hydraulic discs provide.

Surely if current rim brakes give enough power to lock up a wheel, disc brakes cannot give any more effective power?

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Surely if current rim brakes give enough power to lock up a wheel, disc brakes cannot give any more effective power?

 

Exactly. You could easily lock up drum brakes on an old car. Why the hell did they move from cable operated drum brakes to hydraulic discs with ABS? Twits.

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Surely if current rim brakes give enough power to lock up a wheel, disc brakes cannot give any more effective power?

 

Come on, bra Ed. You know that it's always the back brakes that lock up. And most of your braking is done with the front brake. How many times have you locked up your front wheel while riding in a straight line?

 

There are many road riders out there who long for the same braking power they have on their mountain bikes.

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There are many road riders out there who long for the same braking power they have on their mountain bikes.

 

Coming down Silvias pass at 60- 80 kmph requires nerves of steel when that traffic light is Red. Hydraulics would be a god-send!

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Come on, bra Ed. You know that it's always the back brakes that lock up. And most of your braking is done with the front brake. How many times have you locked up your front wheel while riding in a straight line?

I did it once in an emergency stop and it scared me shitless so I'm not going to try doing it again. I'm willing to concede that I don't have enough experience with disc brakes to see the benefit on a road bike, though. I'm just a bit sceptical of marketing hype.

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Exactly. You could easily lock up drum brakes on an old car. Why the hell did they move from cable operated drum brakes to hydraulic discs with ABS? Twits.

Once you lock up the wheel, the stopping force is reduced since the tyre is sliding. The point at which the wheel starts to lock represents the maximum stopping force and maximum needed braking force. Any braking force above that point isn't doing anything. ABS keeps the tyre just that point of maximum force. It would work just as well on drum or disc brakes.

 

Disc brakes offer better performance on a car since they dissipate heat better and are less susceptible to brake fade etc. They give a more consistent performance under continuous, repeated braking. On most bicycle wheels (with the possible exception of carbon wheels on long descents), the amount of heat accumulated is not an issue.

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