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Riding Deep Sections In CPT


BassoBoy
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Well this Saturday was great in CPT to waking up to 50-75km/h winds. I decided to not take my chances going out early. With my fellow club members who went windsurfing on their 50mm wheels. I went out later when it calmed down bit.  I got pushed out of the bike lane a couple of times and almost went horizontal on my 20mm :wacko: wheels.

 

I was told a few days ago to ride deep sections in CPT, one must be really stupid or brave so I was wondering whats your best wheel combo (22mm, 36mm,80mm :eek: )for Cape Town's wind and weather? 

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I rode the 35mm rims that came with my bike and they were fine - running on 28mm tyres which helps too. The wind made things a bit interesting descending Chappies. It helps to ride the more sheltered routes, Constantia neck etc. Woodstock sideway gusts through the buildings are always a problem in the wind.

 

We did Constantia neck loops, then passed Muizenburg around 7am on Saturday, hard work -  although the wind was pumping it wasn't gusting and changing direction, been out in worse conditions. On the bright side, we flew back at record speed - set some nice PRs on the return  :clap:

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Why ride deep sections at all when not racing? Zipp had a note on their website recommending that people not train with their wheels, as they would undertrain by 10 to 20w on every such ride, unless they use a powermeter.

Sounds like some marketing BS to me.

RPE is RPE

300W is 300W

170bpm is 170bpm

 

You just go maybe a 1km/hr faster...maybe, if you into marginal gains and all that crap.

 

I use my carbon wheels because they’re my favourite wheels. I paid good money for them and therefore they will get used to reduce the cents per kilometer I spent on them.

They’re not an appreciating asset so they should be milked to within an inch of their life before i retire them and turn into a coffee table and wall clock

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There certainly are merrit to both sides of the debate - similar to the "train heavy, race light" school of thought. I used a heavy steel bike with Chorus for training, and a light carbon one for racing at some point for a few years. I sold the steel training bike for the reason Diesel mentioned - my fancy bike was not getting used that much.

Re wheels, the ideal scenario would be to have both very low profile rims, and very aero ones.

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There certainly are merrit to both sides of the debate - similar to the "train heavy, race light" school of thought. I used a heavy steel bike with Chorus for training, and a light carbon one for racing at some point for a few years. I sold the steel training bike for the reason Diesel mentioned - my fancy bike was not getting used that much.

Re wheels, the ideal scenario would be to have both very low profile rims, and very aero ones.

 

 

A spare set is a nice luxury. If you have the means , go for it. I'm lucky enough to have a spare bike so I use the training bike for very windy days. It got all my older parts on it. This way I get maximum use out of my spend.

I've got chums with wheels hanging up in their garage that get used for 109km per year....

You can just hear them devaluing on those hooks

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Deep sections are sexy.

 

A few tips:

 

1. With 50 km/h gusts, go to gym. Or load them shallow rim ugly mother wheels.

2. Transfer weight onto front wheel intentionally if unsure of control.

3. Roll with relaxed and soft grip on them bars.

4. Allow for space from others in your bunch or them motorcars to deviate from your line.

5. The more you use them in the 30-40 km/h gusts, the better you will become.

 

Deep sections are sexy.

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Well this Saturday was great in CPT to waking up to 50-75km/h winds. I decided to not take my chances going out early. With my fellow club members who went windsurfing on their 50mm wheels. I went out later when it calmed down bit.  I got pushed out of the bike lane a couple of times and almost went horizontal on my 20mm :wacko: wheels.

 

I was told a few days ago to ride deep sections in CPT, one must be really stupid or brave so I was wondering whats your best wheel combo (22mm, 36mm,80mm :eek: )for Cape Town's wind and weather? 

I ride a 45mm deep section wheelset daily on my SS commuter, no matter the weather ... no issues to date.

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Why ride deep sections at all when not racing? Zipp had a note on their website recommending that people not train with their wheels, as they would undertrain by 10 to 20w on every such ride, unless they use a powermeter.

 

Cause its a mission to change break-pads each time from alu to carbon so I just keep my carbons on.  

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Well this Saturday was great in CPT to waking up to 50-75km/h winds. I decided to not take my chances going out early. With my fellow club members who went windsurfing on their 50mm wheels. I went out later when it calmed down bit.  I got pushed out of the bike lane a couple of times and almost went horizontal on my 20mm :wacko: wheels.

 

I was told a few days ago to ride deep sections in CPT, one must be really stupid or brave so I was wondering whats your best wheel combo (22mm, 36mm,80mm :eek: )for Cape Town's wind and weather? 

Never had a problem, we rode on Saturday with 50-60km/h gusts. We were on 40, 50 and 60mm deep sections and no issues. 

 

My old man rolls on 60mm in the wind, no problem. 

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